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Help Me Get This Dairy Thing Straight
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8 posts in this topic

After quite some time of elimination diet and accidents/experiments, I have started noticing a strange pattern in my relationship with dairy. Premise: I could not tolerate milk at all as a baby and was brought up on formula. I apparently grew out of it and always enjoyed my small latte in the morning and a yogurt during the day for almost three decades. I was also a cheese connoisseur for a long part of my life, loved all dairy except butter, which I loathed - and still do - with a completely irrational passion.

 

I can drink milk no problem. Yogurt, kefir, skyr are also fine. Half and half doesn't bother me - but it never crosses my path unless I'm at a conference. Ricotta, cream cheese, and cottage cheese also fine.

 

I don't seem to do as well with medium hard cheeses, or even hard cheeses. But medium ones (gouda, cheddar, etc) are the worst. Within about 20 minutes I get bloating and I have to go and rouge my nose because cheese apparently makes it... white :wacko: . Sorry, I can't think of a more ladylike way of expressing this! :lol:

 

Now my question is: HOW is this possible??? What might be that I am reacting to? It has been suggested in the past that I may be reacting to some additives used in cheese-making; any other thoughts?

 

Thanks!

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There's too many races and species and cross breeds kinds of cows to get milk totally straight :!). Maybe even more importantly there's just as many different kinds of humans and some races are notably not cow milk happy at all. As we know unless you are suicidal you would never go near milk if you were of African decent as nearly 100% are intolerant of it. 

 

Europeans can take it but only for so long and so much. Because of all these uncertainties I rather just not eat it myself. if I had a cow in my backyard that I choose and knew what kind of milk I was getting all the time then I would keep doing cow milk yoghurt which seems OK but I still don't trust it totally. In your case the only thing I can think of in aged cheese that isn't in fresh milk is yeast, the older the cheese the more yeast it will have.

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-You could have a whey allergy or intolerance. You can buy whey by itself in the health section. It's used for body building. Harder cheeses have more of it I believe.

-The different culture thing makes sense too. Do you react to medium or hard cheeses when they're melted? I'm not sure the cultures would live through heat, granted really high heat for a long time would also make for really gross cheese. I would try that out.

-You may also have an issue with coloring added to many cheeses. Is white cheddar as bad as yellow?

-Gouda can be pretty hard and you may have only eaten smoked gouda which you may react to?

-Might you have a reaction to some waxes that are on cheeses? The gouda I get around here always seems to have a bright red wax on it...(could again be a coloring thing)

 

Wait, I think I have what contains a lot of whey backwards...you probably don't hae a whey issue

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Someone already mentioned yeast, which I definitely have a problem with.  Could be a mold allergy as well - some of the harder cheeses have higher mold content (not just the visable kind in bleu cheese).  I can tolerate whey protein (in small amounts and without added sugar), cream cheese and such, but some of the hard cheeses bother me as well - which is so awful because I LOVE cheese as a snack (protein, no sugar, low carb).  Only snack I've found so far is nuts, and those get tiresome (and fattening) after awhile!!

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There's too many races and species and cross breeds kinds of cows to get milk totally straight :!). Maybe even more importantly there's just as many different kinds of humans and some races are notably not cow milk happy at all. As we know unless you are suicidal you would never go near milk if you were of African decent as nearly 100% are intolerant of it. 

 

Europeans can take it but only for so long and so much. Because of all these uncertainties I rather just not eat it myself. if I had a cow in my backyard that I choose and knew what kind of milk I was getting all the time then I would keep doing cow milk yoghurt which seems OK but I still don't trust it totally. In your case the only thing I can think of in aged cheese that isn't in fresh milk is yeast, the older the cheese the more yeast it will have.

 

Yeah, I know what you mean... I've been trying to limit cheese to a "once in a while" thing, but sometimes even that "once" gets me.

 

No, no other thoughts than that one, the cheese making cultures.  Have you read this:

 

http://www.slowfood.com/slowcheese/eng/57/the-role-of-enzymes

 

Interesting! I knew some of the issue - I am myself a Slow Food member - but somehow I had always thought of this as a taste problem, and hadn't thought it as a rummy problem!

 

-You could have a whey allergy or intolerance. You can buy whey by itself in the health section. It's used for body building. Harder cheeses have more of it I believe.

-The different culture thing makes sense too. Do you react to medium or hard cheeses when they're melted? I'm not sure the cultures would live through heat, granted really high heat for a long time would also make for really gross cheese. I would try that out.

-You may also have an issue with coloring added to many cheeses. Is white cheddar as bad as yellow?

-Gouda can be pretty hard and you may have only eaten smoked gouda which you may react to?

-Might you have a reaction to some waxes that are on cheeses? The gouda I get around here always seems to have a bright red wax on it...(could again be a coloring thing)

 

Wait, I think I have what contains a lot of whey backwards...you probably don't hae a whey issue

 

Colour and waxes may be a problem, you are right - but I have had all sorts of goudas, mostly non-smoked. Thanks for making me LOL at the "killing cultures" practice! Yes, I agree it would make for very gross cheese... I actually never eat melted cheese.

 

Someone already mentioned yeast, which I definitely have a problem with.  Could be a mold allergy as well - some of the harder cheeses have higher mold content (not just the visable kind in bleu cheese).  I can tolerate whey protein (in small amounts and without added sugar), cream cheese and such, but some of the hard cheeses bother me as well - which is so awful because I LOVE cheese as a snack (protein, no sugar, low carb).  Only snack I've found so far is nuts, and those get tiresome (and fattening) after awhile!!

 

Mmm... hadn't thought about molds...

 

I have decided to give the whole cheese thing a break and stick to what seems to be ok only. But I will mention these to my doc when I see her. Thanks!

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Yes I seem to been one who's allergic to histamine in foods, really weird since my histamine levels in my body are also crazy high, or at least were until I started on the Zyrtec. yeasts/moulds/histamine as far as I can tell these are what causes me pain and undigested proteins cause the other problems. I finally got myself some HCL tablets, seemed to be working a treat for a couple of days but might have overdone it today so I better ease myself into those.

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