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#1 EricaM15

 
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Posted 15 March 2013 - 06:25 AM

I was hoping to do some traveling in the future, but at this point I'm not sure how that would be possible with how restrictive my diet has become and my potential level of sensitivity to cross-contamination. I have very severe symptoms and went a long time without diagnosis (still haven't been, officially), so I'm assuming I'm highly sensitive. I was wondering if anyone has tips for managing their diet while they travel. I started eliminating foods at the beginning of last December, and now I'm down to fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.


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#2 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 15 March 2013 - 07:08 AM

First take along what you have been eating in convenient forms.  I like to have dried vegetables when I am on the road.  Nuts would also be very easy to pack.  Fruits you should be able to get all the way.  You don't have any nutrient dense protein on your list that require cooking. 

 

I cook in my "12 volt car oven on the road."  I have one that is able to get to 350 degrees.  I wrap each entree in foil and place each meal in a labeled bag. Then when it is time to cook I place the foiled entrees in the oven at the appropriate time.   I drive my hungry family crazy in the car with tantlizing smells of sweet potato baking in my oven!  My family stops at a restaurant and I eat in the car in the parking lot.  I get the best of the deal,  except for company to eat with.  If I had less people, or more oven capability, I would like to cook for them all.

 

I also take an electric skillet and crock pot.  We try to get a hotel room with a kitchen.  I pack meals with my own ready- to- use spice packs and all of their pieces.   With the crock pot, I can throw everything in the morning and leave it to cook all day.

 

 

 

If you do use eggs hard boiled ones can be packed along in an egg carton.  Another take along is some canned salmon or chicken meat.  I used them when taking a long airline trip.

 

Packing list for kitchen goods.

 

plates

cups

bowls

forks

spoons

electeric skillet

spatula

pie pans (I use for food storage)

knives

napkins

salt

spices

Ice

Eggs

meals

supplements

milk

Butter/oil

foil

scrub brush for dishes

Dish Soap

towels

pot holders

A large pot for washing dishes

A Full jug of well water drinking.

 

In the car I have a bin.  This bin contains everything I need on the road for meals.  I will try to list the things, but I don't have it written out.  This bin now lives in my car ready for day trips or vacation.  Contents:

 

Paper plates

Paper bowls

Plastic utensils (make sure they are not corn if corn is a problem.)

napkins

sea salt

packages of honey

Knives

Can opener

 

This bin in the car has made it so much easier for me to go places.  It is  ready with little effert.  Okay, so sometimes you have to use a spoon for spaghetti, but that is better than no utensil at all! 

 

 


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#3 hannahisabrooks

 
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Posted 15 March 2013 - 07:55 AM

I am a backpacker. I have traveled to 29 countries and lived in five. It's my passion, my love. I was just diagnosed in the U.S. not too long ago and when I imagine going off on a trip, to be honest I get a bit sad. I am also very sensitive and I'm heartbroken that maybe I can no longer hitch-hike across Central Asia, which was my next area of the world to hit. The thing is I can't bring food with me. I generally have one backpack and that's all I have with me for six to eight months. I will have to eat the local food, so I suppose it will take lots of research and study of local cuisine. I will also have to study the languages more and be prepared to explain celiacs. Maybe bring my own little gas stove everywhere?

 

Traveling is my passion. I will make it work, somehow and someway. I love it enough to not give up. And if you love to travel, don't give it up either.

 

Btw, I'm gluten-free, casein-free, night-shade free and begrudgingly starting to go soy-free. Hopefully when I heal more I will be able to reintroduce some of these foods back, especially soy and night-shades. 


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#4 julissa

 
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Posted 15 March 2013 - 07:57 AM

wow, this sounds like you have it down to a science.

 

I went away 2 weeks ago and packed similar to this, I took my breakfast oatmeal and just got hot water and banana at the buffet in the hotel. I also brought indiv packs of tuna and some udi's bagels, kind bars, fruits, nuts. I found a dedicated gluten free restaurant and had both dinners there. it can be done, not easily, but it can be done.

 

I am going to Israel in June, and am already trying nervously to figure out how I will do that, but I am going. 


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#5 Greebo115

 
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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:29 AM

Plastic utensils (make sure they are not corn if corn is a problem.)
 


What??????!!!!!! PLASTIC CAN BE MADE OF CORN?
Do you think drinking from a 'corn' plastic cup can give the same reactions as eating corn?
I ask because, 2 weeks ago, I went to a different bar than the one I normally go to, and they used plastic cups. I had a drink of black currant cordial made with tap water and before I had even finished the drink I began having pain in my stomach, by the time I finished it, I looked very, very pregnant and was in big pain ( I was so big, I could even get the front edges of my coat to meet, never mind button it up!).

I was convinced I had somehow been glutened, although I really couldn't work out how...I had been so very vigilant....I was SO very ill, had the whole range of glutening symptoms, I lost a whole week to feeling like I'd been hit by a truck, then just felt like crap for the next week, only just feeling near normal after 2 weeks.

I know I do react badly to corn when I eat it.......but really, has anyone else reacted to a corn-based plastic? Was it the cup that got me?

Sorry for hijacking the thread about travel, but before I knew I had celiac (plus intolerances), I used to love travelling and would use plastic utensils a lot......at the moment, I'm getting reluctant to step a foot out of the door for fear of getting 'got' by something
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Obvious symptoms started as a baby with gastroenteritis....
Self - diagnosed celiac at age 41 - Gluten-free since December 2012, shortly after realised in needed to avoid:
Dairy, soy, all grains, all pseudo-grains, nightshades, legumes, MSG, xantham gum, all sugar alcohols.
Low sugar/refined carbs since Aug '08 due to reactive hypoglycemia.

22/03/13 Mung beans and blackeyebeans reintroduced successfully!

26/06/13 Some symptoms mysteriously returned - found loads of CC in my nuts and dried beans!! (verified by food/symptom journal and emails to companies)

26/11/13 After 2 weeks on crutches (again) realised that legumes cause my joints to inflame - it's undeniable....legumes gone!


#6 EricaM15

 
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Posted 15 March 2013 - 12:02 PM

I am a backpacker. I have traveled to 29 countries and lived in five. It's my passion, my love. I was just diagnosed in the U.S. not too long ago and when I imagine going off on a trip, to be honest I get a bit sad. I am also very sensitive and I'm heartbroken that maybe I can no longer hitch-hike across Central Asia, which was my next area of the world to hit. The thing is I can't bring food with me. I generally have one backpack and that's all I have with me for six to eight months. I will have to eat the local food, so I suppose it will take lots of research and study of local cuisine. I will also have to study the languages more and be prepared to explain celiacs. Maybe bring my own little gas stove everywhere?

 

Traveling is my passion. I will make it work, somehow and someway. I love it enough to not give up. And if you love to travel, don't give it up either.

 

Btw, I'm gluten-free, casein-free, night-shade free and begrudgingly starting to go soy-free. Hopefully when I heal more I will be able to reintroduce some of these foods back, especially soy and night-shades. 

This is actually what I had planned on doing before I discovered all my secondary intolerances. I basically just need a way to find my safe foods in the places I travel to without having to rely on restaurants and whatnot.

 

I am going to Israel in June, and am already trying nervously to figure out how I will do that, but I am going. 

I was just in Israel last December, and at the time I was only gluten-free and vegan (can't handle meat or dairy). It's actually fairly easy there. Israel is pretty aware of Celiac Disease. They have an organization dedicated to researching it. If you're in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem, there are markets where you can get pretty much anything you need. There are also some gluten-free stores. When I went to restaurants, I usually ordered a salad. It sounds like you have fewer sensitivities than I do, so you should have no trouble.


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#7 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 15 March 2013 - 03:02 PM

I just heard of cards you can present in various languages to explain you are gluten free. http://glutenfreepas...nslation-cards/

 

The following portion is Erica's.  I am not quite sure what I did here.

 

 

"I am a backpacker. I have traveled to 29 countries and lived in five. It's my passion, my love. I was just diagnosed in the U.S. not too long ago and when I imagine going off on a trip, to be honest I get a bit sad. I am also very sensitive and I'm heartbroken that maybe I can no longer hitch-hike across Central Asia, which was my next area of the world to hit. The thing is I can't bring food with me. I generally have one backpack and that's all I have with me for six to eight months. I will have to eat the local food, so I suppose it will take lots of research and study of local cuisine. I will also have to study the languages more and be prepared to explain celiacs. Maybe bring my own little gas stove everywhere?

 

Traveling is my passion. I will make it work, somehow and someway. I love it enough to not give up. And if you love to travel, don't give it up either.

 

Btw, I'm gluten-free, casein-free, night-shade free and begrudgingly starting to go soy-free. Hopefully when I heal more I will be able to reintroduce some of these foods back, especially soy and night-shades. "


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#8 alesusy

 
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Posted 16 March 2013 - 12:18 PM

Same problem. I travelled to Amsterdam and ate twice in a Thai restaurant explaining that I wanted stuff with no soy sauce and I didn't get sick (I was lucky, though). I'm travelling next week to Lyon in France (sadly, a place choke full of good restaurants) and later I'm travelling to London and to Prague.

 

I can't have dairy but I will eat meat and fish. My plan is

 

to bring along some processed food - crackers and the like - and some nuts, plus a package of pasta because I can always ask restaurants to cook THAT, and a bottle of Tamari soy sauce to use in Japanese or Thai restaurants

to buy fresh fruit whenever I can at market stalls

to have a list of gluten free restaurants

to eat meat and fish cooked as simply as possible (ideally, grilled or boiled, no sauces) with potatoes or boiled vegetables or rice or salad; have orange juice and eggs for breakfast. This means explaining a lot of things to waiters and restaurant owners about the preparation of food. However, I'm finding that people are generally rather informed.

 

I find that a good strategy is to phone restaurants and hotels before getting there. When you are there, you reinforce the message. Of course this works in a city and not if you're backpacking through Afghanistan.. I must say, being a vegetarian makes it more difficult.


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#9 Coryad

 
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Posted 16 March 2013 - 07:29 PM

I travel all over the world, it's tough in some places but for the most part I can ask for plain meats and veggies.... it gets me through.  I've only been glutened once or twice.... maybe I've been lucky but it CAN be done.  We love to travel and I'll be damned if this is going to stop me.  

 

I was vegetarian before diagnosis, but I went back to some meats because I couldn't (in my head) survive on fruit and veg :D  I can't eat dairy, soy, nightshades.... so I felt quite limited.

 

You CAN travel it just may take a little more planning.  If you travel to cities use the internet and find local restaurant menus online. When we go to the UK we rent a flat for the week and make most of our own meals, but restaurants there are excellent at gluten-free, never once had an issue.

 

Good luck, you can do it!!


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Diagnosed Celiac 4/12 due to DH
Eliminated food molds 1/12

#10 hannahisabrooks

 
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Posted 17 March 2013 - 07:33 AM

This is actually what I had planned on doing before I discovered all my secondary intolerances. I basically just need a way to find my safe foods in the places I travel to without having to rely on restaurants and whatnot.

 

I was just in Israel last December, and at the time I was only gluten-free and vegan (can't handle meat or dairy). It's actually fairly easy there. Israel is pretty aware of Celiac Disease. They have an organization dedicated to researching it. If you're in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem, there are markets where you can get pretty much anything you need. There are also some gluten-free stores. When I went to restaurants, I usually ordered a salad. It sounds like you have fewer sensitivities than I do, so you should have no trouble.

 Yes, both you and I need to find a way to do this. I'm simply going to have to change how I travel. Instead of restaurants, I'll just bring my own stove everywhere and cook my own food that I buy there. I can't risk eating out at restaurants, even when they are 'gluten free' I still sometimes get sick. And if I get sick while traveling, the entire trip could be in jeopardy. Plus, my next place to travel includes Iran, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, and if my money hasn't run out back to Mongolia. These places definitely won't have gluten-free options at their restaurants! Thankfully I travel mostly in  places where if I'm cooking my own food outside my tent, they won't ask any questions. While a stove will add considerable weight to my pack, I guess that what I'll have to do.

 

Thankfully I do have fewer sensitivities than you, but definitely don't let it stop you. You might not be able to travel as cheaply or easily as others, but you can still do it. And if you eventually want a travel buddy, just let me know. =) I'm always up for a trip.


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#11 hannahisabrooks

 
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Posted 17 March 2013 - 07:37 AM

I travel all over the world, it's tough in some places but for the most part I can ask for plain meats and veggies.... it gets me through.  I've only been glutened once or twice.... maybe I've been lucky but it CAN be done.  We love to travel and I'll be damned if this is going to stop me.  

 

I was vegetarian before diagnosis, but I went back to some meats because I couldn't (in my head) survive on fruit and veg :D  I can't eat dairy, soy, nightshades.... so I felt quite limited.

 

You CAN travel it just may take a little more planning.  If you travel to cities use the internet and find local restaurant menus online. When we go to the UK we rent a flat for the week and make most of our own meals, but restaurants there are excellent at gluten-free, never once had an issue.

 

Good luck, you can do it!!

I was also a vegetarian before diagnosed. While I'm still trying my hardest not to eat meat, I do struggle. How did you start eating meat again? It makes me feel bloated and I get painfully constipated.

 

Thanks for the encouragement about traveling btw. I can't wait to hit the road again!


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#12 EricaM15

 
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Posted 17 March 2013 - 03:12 PM

I've been a vegetarian for eight years and I just can't get myself to eat meat again. When I've tried, it didn't necessarily upset my stomach right away, but I definitely wouldn't feel good afterward. It was during the time I was sickest and was craving animal protein because I wasn't getting any nourishment, but eating it didn't make that any better. I could have been having a psychological reaction as well because I'm against eating meat for animal rights, environmental, and health reasons because of the fact that meat is contaminated with so many hormones and are usually fed GM corn--a proven carcinogen. Obviously, nobody truly knows what causes Celiac, so I'm trying to eliminate the possibility of making it worse. I've committed myself to a raw vegan diet for at least a year, and I'm hoping that will help me recover from some of my intolerances. It also sort of just happened naturally with the way my intolerances have unfolded. I eliminated dairy and additives first, then gluten, grains, soy, legumes, peanuts, potatoes, and most recently, sugar and almonds. So, I'm not really too concerned about cooking for that reason. I just need easily accessible food markets and whatever. I'm definitely up for having a travel buddy though, especially a fellow Celiac.


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#13 love2travel

 
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Posted 17 March 2013 - 06:06 PM

If travel is your passion, find a way to do it.  Food and travel are my passions and I refuse to allow celiac, etc. prevent me from doing what I love most.  You would not believe the severe chronic back pain I have and at times I think I am crazy to travel internationally but I do it.  The flights nearly kill me - literally - but I stand up much of the time.  It is really, really hard but pain and celiac cannot control me.  I use the celiac restaurant cards as well as we travel to countries where English is not the first language and they really help.  It also helps to stay in an apartment rather than a hotel so you can buy fresh produce at markets and prepare meals yourself. 

 

One big suggestion is to plan for lots of delays at airports.  They inevitably happen, of course.  My carry on contains many snacks just in case and they have really come in handy at times.  I make Chex mixes and bars; I take along Skittles and dried fruit and nuts if allowed in that country.  Many airports have nothing to offer those of us with celiac so I plan ahead for that, too.

 

The level of awareness in some places has been pleasantly surprising; others not so much.  Once in that country I will go to the DM or other store to pick up some staples such as bread.  I research the options like crazy before leaving!


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<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#14 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 17 March 2013 - 06:18 PM

Has anyone taking a back pack trip and how would you pack for that?  I personally would not want to put what's on my list on my back, but maybe in a large tired suitcase on wheels?  Maybe I just invented the large- wheel for suitcase concept, but it sounds like a winner to me!

 

Diana


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#15 shadowicewolf

 
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Posted 17 March 2013 - 06:32 PM

If travel is your passion, find a way to do it.  Food and travel are my passions and I refuse to allow celiac, etc. prevent me from doing what I love most.  You would not believe the severe chronic back pain I have and at times I think I am crazy to travel internationally but I do it.  The flights nearly kill me - literally - but I stand up much of the time.  It is really, really hard but pain and celiac cannot control me.  I use the celiac restaurant cards as well as we travel to countries where English is not the first language and they really help.  It also helps to stay in an apartment rather than a hotel so you can buy fresh produce at markets and prepare meals yourself. 

 

One big suggestion is to plan for lots of delays at airports.  They inevitably happen, of course.  My carry on contains many snacks just in case and they have really come in handy at times.  I make Chex mixes and bars; I take along Skittles and dried fruit and nuts if allowed in that country.  Many airports have nothing to offer those of us with celiac so I plan ahead for that, too.

 

The level of awareness in some places has been pleasantly surprising; others not so much.  Once in that country I will go to the DM or other store to pick up some staples such as bread.  I research the options like crazy before leaving!

Exactly!

 

I plan to, one day, travel to Japan. I know that i'd probably have to either rent an apartment per area so i could cook, but that won't stop me :)


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