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A Cheesy Note To Newbies With Secondary Lactose Intolerance

cheese lactose

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#1 ABQ-Celiac

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:58 AM

For those newish celiacs with secondary lactose intolerance, like me, I wanted to give a shout-out of encouragement.

 

When I was first diagnosed in October 2012, one of the hardest pills to swallow was my secondary lactose intolerance. I couldn't imagine living without dairy. I read on this forum and many others that secondary lactose intolerance often went away in 6 months to 2 years. I banked on it. I prayed for it.

 

Every once in a while I'd try to a small milk chocolate candy or a small piece of cheese, but I always felt nauseous a short time later.

 

Until 5 and 1/2 months passed. Then I had a small amount of cheddar cheese on my eggs. No problem. I tried shredded cheddar on my potato fine. I've not yet experimented with REAL milk yet, or ice cream, but being able to add cheese to my daily bowl of rice has made me happy.


I feared, after the first couple of months, that I had lost dairy forever. Now I'm hopeful one day to glug a big glass of REAL milk again, and dive into some ice cream.

 

Hang in there, I guess, is the message. I've received so much support from these forums, I wanted to share this encouragement with others.


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#2 alesusy

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:49 PM

Hi ABQ - good for you!

I still have a severe lactose intolerance (gluten-free since December 2012) but I've found out thankfully, that I can eat well seasoned cheese (Parmesan cheese more than 24 months old is available here in Italy) because it does not containt lactose any more (or less lactose). However I can't have milk nor fresh cheese nor butter nor even large quantities of de-lactosed milk and mozzarella that are on sale in some shops here. Having Parmesa grated on my rice is a big help.


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#3 Patrish

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 02:19 AM

For those newish celiacs with secondary lactose intolerance, like me, I wanted to give a shout-out of encouragement.

 

When I was first diagnosed in October 2012, one of the hardest pills to swallow was my secondary lactose intolerance. I couldn't imagine living without dairy. I read on this forum and many others that secondary lactose intolerance often went away in 6 months to 2 years. I banked on it. I prayed for it.

 

Every once in a while I'd try to a small milk chocolate candy or a small piece of cheese, but I always felt nauseous a short time later.

 

Until 5 and 1/2 months passed. Then I had a small amount of cheddar cheese on my eggs. No problem. I tried shredded cheddar on my potato fine. I've not yet experimented with REAL milk yet, or ice cream, but being able to add cheese to my daily bowl of rice has made me happy.


I feared, after the first couple of months, that I had lost dairy forever. Now I'm hopeful one day to glug a big glass of REAL milk again, and dive into some ice cream.

 

Hang in there, I guess, is the message. I've received so much support from these forums, I wanted to share this encouragement with others.

I am totally lactose intolerant yet I can eat most Cabot cheeses.  It says right on the package 0 grams lactose.  The same with some Kraft cheeses, especially the low moisture mozorealla.  I have had no reactions.  Please be careful if you are sensitive to casseine.


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#4 Celiac Mindwarp

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 02:30 AM

I am 7 months in and I think I just got parmesan back, as long as I don't overdo it. Couldn't manage cheddar, yogurt or milk, but I am hopeful for one day :)

Thanks for sharing, I love the positive stuff
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- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

#5 IrishHeart

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 03:46 AM

Thank you for posting with such encouraging news for the newbs! :)

 

We all say "hang in there" and "you can get those foods back someday", but it ALWAYS helps to have someone say "Look at me, I'm eating cheese (or some other food that gave them grief) again!! whoohoo!" .

 

It took me almost 15 months to get back small amounts of dairy but I seem to have my own slow , steady pace of healing.

After 2 years, I can have ice cream. yaay!!

 

Not sure I am ever going to glug a big ole glass of cow's milk again, but that's okay. I'm good with it.

 

Good for you and when you do have that ice cream---let us know. 

Cheers!


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy



Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; finally DXed on 11/01/10. I figured it out myself. Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
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#6 Ninja

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 06:32 AM

I'm at 14 months and can handle all dairy - foods with high amounts of lactose in moderation. I don't think I'll ever go back to drinking cow's milk straight though...

 

Thanks for sharing, I love reading about progress others have made/continue to make. :)


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Oat Sensitive 9/12

 

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#7 Pegleg84

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 08:57 AM

I didn't develop problems with dairy until a couple years after going gluten-free (or was in denial about any problems beforehand, so kept eating it.) I'm pretty sure casein is my problem more than lactose. I've been dairy free for over a year. I'm finding now that I can handle very small amounts of aged hard cheeses, and small amounts of clarified butter. So here's hoping that I'll be able to nibble on some cheese without fear sometime in the next year.

I haven't drank a full glass of milk in years, so I can survive without that. Almond milk is doing just fine as a substitute, but I need cheeeeese!

 

Cheers

Peg


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~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.




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