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Eating Gluten Free After Wheat...
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I've read a lot of posts saying they miss the "old food" but I can honestly say, "I don't." This morning I had buttermilk pancakes and baked fresh biscuits for this weekend. Many of the foods I've baked with gluten free flour and starches I think taste better. Sure, it doesn't have the same aesthetic appearances but as Mom always says, "it will eat the same." I'm not sure if its acceptance, it's fresher (I'm having to cook from scratch instead of ready made" or it really does taste better. What are other people's thoughts?

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I haven't baked gluten-free yet, I really didn't bake before. but I will say that all my food is fresh and whole, no preservatives or anything out of a box now. it's really a beautiful way to eat.

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The texture of gluten-free baked goods take a bit of getting used to. I like it now but when I take gluten-free baking to people's houses, my goodies don't disappear nearly as fast as my old "glutinous" baking did. I doesn't help that I've cut the sugar a bunch too.  LOL

 

The main thing I miss is convenience for my children. I can happily order a salad if I'm out and need a bite to eat but my kids are picky eaters and there is no way they'd eat a salad... It's annoying to know that I can't even order them french fries from most places without cc. I travel with a small cooler of fruits and nuts everywhere I go.  :rolleyes:

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I think it tastes different, but for the most part much better, because it's home- baked.  I also don't use gums very much at all, instead using the gluten-free flours that tend to need them less, combined with soaked chia seed.

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The only thing I really miss is McDonald's Big Macs:-) I was gluten free for a little over two months and went back on for an endoscopy. I felt like I was polluting myself. Back on gluten free again and I think lots of gluten free stuff tastes good. Plus I am eating more fruits and veggies....It is a better lifestyle.

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Mostly, I miss the convenience of the food. Not necessarily the food itself. Although, I would do almost anything for a Papa Johns pizza! :)

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I agree with the other responses with missing the convenience of a non-gluten free lifestyle.  I work full time (9-5) and then am in nursing school from 6-10:30pm, so I'm carrying around a huge bag of food with me everyday (breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks) which is nowhere near convenient.  I miss the freedom of walking down to the school's coffee shop and picking up a bagel on the way to class, however, being gluten free has made me (obviously) more conscious of what I'm putting into my body and I'm now living a more healthy lifestyle overall.  So I guess everything happens for a reason!!

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A lot of gluten-free things taste better to me. They don't have that overly packaged, to much salt or sugar taste to the. I make breakfast every weekend at home and my non celiac disease kids love my food and prefer to eat the gluten-free stuff. I'm all for it, then I don't have to try to make seperate dishes. :)

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I've cooked and baked from scratch my whole life but have tried a few gluten-free commercial products.  YUCK!!!  The only things I really miss the texture of include croissants, English muffins (sure, homemade are good but not as good), yeast doughnuts and chewy bagels.  But then food is my life and my palate is exceptionally discerning.  I would hands down rather have a gluten-filled croissant than gluten free but I would never be tempted to do it.  A croissant is not crucial to my survival, anyway.  Most things are just as good homemade and easy to re-create such as cookies, cakes, brownies, pancakes, waffles...

 

Traveling internationally can be tricky (especially at airports, other countries where English is not the primary language).  I've traveled just to go to food events - not so much any more.  I really miss the ability of going to food festivals and trying everything.  Now that just is not possible.  But I definitely do not dwell on it at all.  While important, celiac is one of the least stressful parts of my life. It used to be my focus but is not any more.  Of course I am painfully careful but it is automatic and habitual.

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       It is normal for people to socialize with each other and to be comfortable about it. You said you have problems still socializing and being around people. It might be a depressing thought but it sounds to me like you still have problems with anxiety.  I would recommend considering what options you have available to treat the anxiety. When I quit eating Gluten I still had some symptoms, even though I felt much better. I have been slowly recovering over a period of about three years. I had obsessive thoughts even after I quit eating gluten.  Now I very rarely if at all think about those things. My experience is that my mind would latch on to certain things that caused me anxiety and focus on those things. Sometimes my focus would shift and I would latch onto other things. My ability to socialize has also improved greatly with time. I have made some dietary changes which I believe have helped greatly. It sounds to me like you have obsessive thoughts about things and maybe some brain damage. My experience has been that my obsessive thoughts about different things went away with time. I feel my obsessive thoughts were caused by gluten and not by what people did around me or any events. As my brain healed I became more self aware and things became less stressful.  I can't give medical advice on this forum but I can talk about my current diet and my experience with celiac disease. My experience with gluten is different from a lot of other people so it is a good idea to ask other people and to talk to a doctor.  I avoid oats and avoid almost all processed foods. I buy certified gluten free food. I eat healthy and I exercise every day. I take st John's Wort as I have read studies that say it may be as effective as some other anti-depressants for treating certain types of anxiety. It is available over the counter. I started with a small dosage and then stepped it up over time. I think it helps a lot.  This is also something that you should talk to a doctor about first. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Martin_Mahoney2/publication/7426926_St._John's_wort/links/540d8acc0cf2f2b29a386673.pdf A lot of people with celiac disease have vitamin deficiencies.  Vitamin b deficiency can cause anxiety. Some people do not process the synthetic form of vitamin b (from normal pills)  very well, and do better on an activated form of vitamin b. I take:
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