Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Hypothyroidism, Celiac Disease And Infertility. Do I Really Need To Be Tested?
0

6 posts in this topic

My wife and I have been trying to conceive for the past 6 months. We’ve had a couple exciting moments when we thought we were pregnant, but alas, still no joy.

 

I recently discovered that infertility in males is a symptom of Hashimoto’s Disease (which I am diagnosed with), and the easiest way to overcome it is a gluten-free diet. It makes me sad because I love bread so much. :,(  But I digress...

 

In the past few years I’ve been experiencing intense abdominal pains and somewhat frequent constipation after certain meals. I actually thought I was allergic to olive oil, but since there isn’t a cheap and easy test for that I will never know for sure, but what I am sure of, is that all of the meals that have caused the pain have been wheat based; pasta, bread, cereal (cereal is the worst), etc. I’m very sensitive to dairy, too so it’s always so hard to say what causes the pain, but the lowest common denominator has always been wheat.

 

The pain varies from feeling a little bloated to so severe I can’t sleep. It is sometimes accompanied by diarrhea but not always. A few nights ago my wife made a homemade focaccia bread to go with dinner. Immediately after dinner I began to feel icky. I also had wheat at breakfast and lunch, but not quite as much at those times.

 

So I started casually browsing the web about Hashimoto’s disease (hypothyroidism) to see if I had missed anything about my condition in the past. As it turns out, I've been missing a LOT.  While scrolling through a wiki entry a word popped out at me: infertility. I had probably seen it before but never dedicated it to memory because it wasn’t something I cared about until recently. Then came the nested searches, one thing leading me to another thing and then to yet another thing until I came upon the strikingly common connection between Hashimoto’s disease and Celiac disease and the issues surrounding gluten for both diseases.  Apparently, gluten can be a trigger for Hashimoto's and Hashimoto's can be a trigger for Celiac disease and both can cause issues with infertility.

 

I feel like a huge hypochondriac just writing this, but “what if”? What if, between my thyroid condition and an intolerance for gluten, I have inadvertently reduced my ability to produce healthy sperm and am simultaneously destroying myself from the inside out all because I love bread maybe just a little too much?

 

It seems pretty clear that a gluten-free diet is the way to go regardless of whether or not I actually have Celiac disease.  I know I need to keep eating gluten for the tests to work, but what I want to know is, do I really need the tests at all?  If I have other reasons to go gluten-free outside of Celiac do I even need to bother?

 

I don't know... I'm feeling kind of betrayed by my doctors over the years for not clueing me in on some of this stuff.  Cross-checking thyroid patients for Celiac disease is not a common practice, despite how often they go together, and I've never had a doctor suggest a special diet for me despite the overwhelming information available online and from books about thyroid diets.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

A big welcome to the board. 

 

While I am not specifically familiar with male fertility issues associated with celiac, they are most assuredly associated with pregnancy and childbearing in women, so without looking it up I would have to assume if you have done your reading that it could certainly also be a male issue.  I have often said that fertility clinics should first be required to run a celiac panel :rolleyes:   What is hypochondriacal about concerns with fertility??  Very real issue, and one that doctors are not particularly clued into, alas.

 

As for the benefits of being tested, some find that it is a good motivator to stick with the diet if they have been officially stamped "celiac"; they need never second guess themselves.  It is also good to be aware that any future children you have will have the likelihood of developing the condition so they should be monitored and tested periodically.

 

Autoimmune disease begets autoimmune disease, so if you have one you may well develop others.  The blood test is such a simple step, so do it now while your antibodies are busy running around.  Don't wait until they've gone away and then wish you had had the testing. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A big welcome to the board. 

 

While I am not specifically familiar with male fertility issues associated with celiac, they are most assuredly associated with pregnancy and childbearing in women, so without looking it up I would have to assume if you have done your reading that it could certainly also be a male issue.  I have often said that fertility clinics should first be required to run a celiac panel :rolleyes:   What is hypochondriacal about concerns with fertility??  Very real issue, and one that doctors are not particularly clued into, alas.

 

As for the benefits of being tested, some find that it is a good motivator to stick with the diet if they have been officially stamped "celiac"; they need never second guess themselves.  It is also good to be aware that any future children you have will have the likelihood of developing the condition so they should be monitored and tested periodically.

 

Autoimmune disease begets autoimmune disease, so if you have one you may well develop others.  The blood test is such a simple step, so do it now while your antibodies are busy running around.  Don't wait until they've gone away and then wish you had had the testing. :)

Wow.  That makes me feel a lot better about it.  Thank you for the kind and quick response! I didn't even consider that my children might have the same condition.  I guess I should just do it.  I'm very used to having my blood drawn so it should be no big deal.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can make really great tasting muffins with almond, or coconut flour.  Some people enjoy them more than their old bread.  The food is good, if you don't like it right away, you can develop a taste for it.  Once you are gluten free and your symptoms start to go away that can help keep you on track.

 

 

Get well soon  ***

Diana

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Schtink,

 

Welcome to the forum! :)

 

Celiac is hereditary so your children should be tested, although it would be hard to get accurate tests when they are very young.  But, having the genes for celiac disease does not by itself mean you have celiac disease.  Many people have the genes but not celiac.  The reaction by the immune system has to be triggered somehow.  There are about 30% of the population that have the genes but only 1% that have the condition.

 

Celiac can cause malabsorption of nutrients (vitamins/minerals etc).  Malabsorption by itself can lead to many problems in the body.  They just don't work right without the vitamins they need to function.

 

I agree that doctors should check Hashimoto's patients for celiac disease.  It is a simple blood raw for the antibody tests panel.

 

They say there are 300 symptoms of celiac disease.  Because it can affect all parts of the body.  I think someone actually put together a list.

 

Please do get the tests done first before going gluten-free.  After going gluten-free the tests become very unreliable.  And going back on gluten for 3 months or so to get tested later can be very unpleasant.  Often it seems that people have worse reactions to gluten after they have been off it for a while.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Welcome to the board.  :)

 

When (if) you request celiac testing, these are the most common ones you might want to request (before going gluten-free):

  • ttg IgA and ttg IgG
  • EMA IgA
  • DGP IgA and DGP IgG
  • total serum IgA
  • AGA IgA and AGA IgG (older tests)

Celiac can cause nutrient deficiencies like low B12, D, ferritin, iron, calcium and potassium. That can affect overall health too.

 

When requesting thyroid testing if suggest asking for:

  • TSH (ideally close to a 1)
  • Free T4 and free T3 (ideally around the 50-75% range of your lab's normal reference range)
  • TPO Ab (should be very low)

 

Celiac can cause Hashi's and vice versa, but once the trigger is pulled (as you put it) you can't put the bullet back into the gun. Treating both disorders can help the other (especially eating gluten-free) but it very very cures the other disease and makes treatment un-needed.

 

You might want to check your adrenals out too. They affect the sex hormones and can be affected by on going autoimmune activity.

 

Good luck! I hope you find answers.  :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      103,896
    • Total Posts
      919,537
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Marshmallow Fruity Pebbles
      I have been gluten free now since February and I recently purchased a box of Marshmallows Fruity Pebbles and looked at the ingredients (which none indicated gluten content), but am just wondering if anyone has had a problem with them. 
    • Test Results
      Update: I am about at my wit's end. I won't be able to see my new doctor until July 17 to get a referral to a GI doctor, so I continue to eat gluten and the effects continue to worsen. Today my boss, whom I have been working with for 12 years, and I had a meeting where he said he's noticed a change in many things, such as speech, not articulating well, forgetfulness, and other things that are affecting my work product. I finally told him I know there is something wrong with me medically and I've been trying to get to the doctor to no avail. I recall those four weeks early in the year when I tried out gluten free and was beginning to feel much better- more present, more sharp, and then went back on gluten in preparation for the blood test.  I just don't think I can do this gluten thing any longer and am thinking of going cold-turkey gluten free.  I'm 54 years old, am beginning not to care about a diagnosis because I just want to feel better and be able to do what I need to do. Because of how I felt going off of gluten earlier in the year, and eating gluten free when I was on the McDougall plan years ago, and how I feel while doing this gluten challenge, I am pretty convinced that my issue is gluten.  Any words of encouragement would be welcome.  If you've done gluten free and never looked back, tell me about it. 
    • Gardasil
      "I got this vaccination in 2009 when I was 20 and it completely altered my life. Made my celiac disease so much worse, sleep 15-18 hours a day, SIBO, it has completely altered my life since getting this vaccination. My doctor has two twin girls about my age and they both have digestion problems after receiving gardasil Thank you I have a young daughter and have wondered this exact question posed by the poster and your response has given me great pause about this issue which may come up in years to come. I am sorry to hear this wreak havoc on your life, but simultaneously thank you for sharing this detail to help those of us that have likely been decades misdiagnosed celiacs now raising children. Thank you.
    • Gluten does WHAT to the brain?
      "Wondering what kind of life my brother could have had - if  he had celiac - constantly haunts me" My sympathies that is just tragic, as this story is.  I hope you are at peace knowing you are aware of your celiac and help so many lost, scared, and confused celiacs here. It can never bring back your brother but I hope it can give soften some of what you feel that was/is beyond your control. His suffering and your loss has made you a better advocate to yourself and in your work helping us. I don't like my body or my  brain on gluten either. I do fear that people overlook the toll inflammation takes on the brain. It likely may explain decades of mental illness that was brain based inflammation unknown until changes in technology advancement catch up. However consuming gluten to study how one enters psychosis may not be the best method. Do no harm.  
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • Jmg  »  admin

      Hello Admin!
      I don't know whether this is of interest to post on your articles feed:
      http://pratt.duke.edu/about/news/window-guts-brain
      Kind Regards,
      Matt
      · 2 replies
    • celiac sharon  »  cyclinglady

      Hello cycling lady, have you noticed my picture is showing up as you?  Have no idea why but it's rather disconcerting to see my picture and your words 😉  Do you know how to fix it?  You seem to have far more experience with this board than I do
      · 1 reply
    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Here is the link if you have never watched it.
      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      60,944
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    purplerain
    Joined