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Making Food For Others


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62 replies to this topic

#1 Melissa.77

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:06 AM

Well Hello everyone.

 

         Im a brand new memeber and have been reading all these post and just soaking it all in. Im having a hard time with all this at this point and assumeit will get easier at one point. I am a mother of 4 kids so making food for them has even been gettting me sick too does anyone know what to do in this situation. Im very stressed out with it all. I cant even get myself out of bed someday because im so sick or at times Im just depressed. Any Idea for help


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#2 kareng

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:30 AM

Here is a good place to start

 

http://www.celiac.co...ewbie-info-101/

 

 

Make as much of your food gluten-free and the accidental crumbs will be reduced. 


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#3 nvsmom

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 12:13 PM

Welcome to the board.

 

I agree with Karen, I would switch them to gluten-free foods (over the next few months) as much as possible. Health-wise, there is not a single reason that they should eat gluten - it's mostly a taste and texture preference, but preferences can change.  :)

 

Have you had your children tested for celiac yet?  There is a genetic link so there is a chance that they have it even if they don't have obvious symptoms. You might want to consider testing them before they are eating too gluten-free.

 

And hang in there. The first few months are hard, and the first few weeks are often very difficult because some of us go through a withdrawl and feel even worse for a while.  Keep at it, it will get easier.


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#4 Cookingpapa

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 12:37 PM

The key thing is to look at ingredients on the labels and look for possible gluten content.

 

Besides the obvious wheat and barley in ingredients, look for the words "natural flavors".

 

When my wife discovered she had celiac disease it was difficult to cook because she loved Italian food and I love chinese. After some research I've been able to find good gluten free options for pasta and have also found replacements for all the chinese sauces in my pantry.


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I'm not gluten intolerant, but my wife is. I joined this blog because I do all the cooking at home and need to be educated so I don't hurt my family.
I'm always looking for recipe ideas and ways to cook and eat healthy. And while I'm not on a tight budget, I have been finding gluten free grocery shopping quite expensive, so all ideas are welcome!

#5 tarnalberry

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 01:00 PM

When I cook for my husband and daughter, they eat gluten free.  They don't mind; there are lots of very tasty things that are naturally gluten free (and not expensive) that you can make.  We have dinner guests every week and I cook gluten free for them as well.  And I cook gluten free for my inlaws when they stay with us.  And when I take cupcakes to preschool... Yeah, you don't have to cook gluten food for anyone else, and you will likely be healthier if you don't.


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Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"
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#6 shadowicewolf

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 01:09 PM

The key thing is to look at ingredients on the labels and look for possible gluten content.
 
Besides the obvious wheat and barley in ingredients, look for the words "natural flavors".
 
When my wife discovered she had celiac disease it was difficult to cook because she loved Italian food and I love chinese. After some research I've been able to find good gluten free options for pasta and have also found replacements for all the chinese sauces in my pantry.

I don't think so, not in the US. Wheat cannot be hidden. As such, "natural Flavors" cannot mask it. It is also highly unlikely that barley would be in there either.
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#7 Melissa.77

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:27 PM

Thank you all for support this is a super hard journey for me. I realy love food alot and have always eaten what I wanted to some now Im a bit depressed. Not to mention I have been in severe pain and not able to get of couch most days. So thanks for all the support


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#8 Melissa.77

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:28 PM

I have also thought about taking my children in after a few months to get checked out as I have been reading it is genetic. Thanks


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#9 bartfull

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:58 PM

Melissa, I don't think there is a single one of us who didn't go through a period of mourning. I think most of us had meltdowns at the grocery store at first. Trying to adjust, learn, adapt, and overcome, all while you are feeling so lousy is so overwhelming. But I PROMISE it will get easier. After a while you don't even think about it anymore. You just eat what becomes normal and get on with your day. Soon you will be feeling so much better you will remember what it was like to enjoy all the other aspects of life. Hang in there and stick around the forum. There is always someone to answer questions, cheer you up, congratulate you on your victories, and teach you cool recipes too.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#10 Takala

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 02:59 PM

Look, guys, if some of you don't quit with the misinfo on the USDA "natural flavors" loophole, which allows gluten in barley and rye byproducts, and from processed starches and other grain byproducts which may not be gluten free, to be applied or used as flavoring or seasonings,  you are going to inadvertently make somebody sick.   USDA does not care at all about gluten free labeling according to a statement I have read from the current Secretary Vilsack, he says companies following VOLUNTARY food labeling for the top 8 allergens is enough and does not think the USA needs stricter standards.  Never assume. We do not have gluten free labeling standards here at this time, April 2013, in the United States. 


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#11 kenlove

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 03:19 PM

Look, guys, if some of you don't quit with the misinfo on the USDA "natural flavors" loophole, which allows gluten in barley and rye byproducts, and from processed starches and other grain byproducts which may not be gluten free, to be applied or used as flavoring or seasonings,  you are going to inadvertently make somebody sick.   USDA does not care at all about gluten free labeling according to a statement I have read from the current Secretary Vilsack, he says companies following VOLUNTARY food labeling for the top 8 allergens is enough and does not think the USA needs stricter standards.  Never assume. We do not have gluten free labeling standards here at this time, April 2013, in the United States. 

where's the like button for this? (^_^)


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#12 Melissa.77

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 03:26 PM

Im sticking aroud here because it has been very helpfull knowing how people cope with all this and to learn more about celiac because I was just diagnosed and told glutin free food only and good luck. Then just sent me on my way


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#13 karichelle

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 04:06 PM

I have been made ill by ingredients hidden under natural flavors...barley malt in an herbal tea. They have to declare wheat but not barley, rye, or oats.


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#14 psawyer

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 04:20 PM

While "natural flavors" can contain gluten, they very rarely actually do. The most likely source would be barley malt, and that is a relatively expensive ingredient, so it is usually explicitly declared as "malt flavor."
 
If there were wheat in it, in the US (and Canada) it would be required by law to be disclosed as just that, "wheat."
 
Shelley Case on flavorings:

It would be rare to find a "natural or artificial flavoring" containing gluten (a) because hydrolyzed wheat protein cannot be hidden under the term "flavor." and (b) barley malt extract is almost always declared as "barley malt extract" or "barley malt flavoring." For this reason, most experts do not restrict natural and artificial flavorings in the gluten-free diet.

 
Gluten-Free Diet - A Comprehensive Resource Guide, published 2008, page 46
 
Note: As of August 2012 Canada requires ALL gluten sources to be explicitly disclosed. Some foods packaged before August 4 may still be in stores.

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#15 julissa

 
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Posted 01 April 2013 - 04:27 PM

when I realized how serious this all was and went gluten free, so did my kitchen and my family. they want gluten? they can get it out. period. I had 11 people for holiday last week, 100% gluten free Seder, no one noticed, although they all had to know.

 

all they could say was how delish it all was.... modestly speaking of course.


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