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Yummy Sub For Potatos

jeresulem artichoke

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9 replies to this topic

#1 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 20 April 2013 - 12:09 PM

The other day I picked up some sun chokes or Jeresulem artichokes.  I peeled them and then shredded them in the food processor and put them in a small pot  with oil a tablespoon of water and  salt.  I rather forget them, having set the timer to steam them for 10 minutes, until I smelled a sensation like that of hash browns frying!  Yum. 

 

I enjoyed a delicious vegetable that night , for sure.  I can't wait until I can find some more.  I recommend trying these for these to anyone not wanting to have potatoes, but that likes the taste and feel of them.  Anyone just wanting to extend their diet might also want to try this.

 

Incase anyone is wondering they are in the sunflower family.  They are roots of a certain variety.  I want to get some in my garden!

 

Diana


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#2 kareng

 
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Posted 20 April 2013 - 12:37 PM

http://www.bhg.com/g...alem-artichoke/


So you basically made hash browns with them?
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#3 bartfull

 
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Posted 20 April 2013 - 03:40 PM

I used to have a patch of them in my yard when I lived in Connecticut. They even look like sunflowers, tall and green, except the flowers are small. They keep coming back each year and each year the patch grows bigger. They can take over your whole yard! They taste even better after the first frost. If you eat them raw in a salad they have a wonderful nutty flavor and the texture of water chestnuts. They are great cooked any way you might cook a potato. I used to slice them thin and fry them. The only problem using homegrown artichokes is that all of those little "nubbies" hold the dirt. You need to scrub them with a toothbrush and even then it's hard to get all of the dirt off of them.

 

I miss them. Can't buy them in a grocery store here and I doubt if they'd grow here either. Enjoy some for me!


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#4 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 20 April 2013 - 06:40 PM

I used to have a patch of them in my yard when I lived in Connecticut. They even look like sunflowers, tall and green, except the flowers are small. They keep coming back each year and each year the patch grows bigger. They can take over your whole yard! They taste even better after the first frost. If you eat them raw in a salad they have a wonderful nutty flavor and the texture of water chestnuts. They are great cooked any way you might cook a potato. I used to slice them thin and fry them. The only problem using homegrown artichokes is that all of those little "nubbies" hold the dirt. You need to scrub them with a toothbrush and even then it's hard to get all of the dirt off of them.

I miss them. Can't buy them in a grocery store here and I doubt if they'd grow here either. Enjoy some for me!


Artichokes will do great in a pot. You could take it in during the winter. They grow in AZ - surely they'll grow there!
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#5 janpell

 
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Posted 21 April 2013 - 04:36 AM

I have this growing in my garden but I haven't tried eating the roots. Unfortunately, they aren't spreading like wildfire...time to get my soil checked! Guess I will try it at the end of the season provided they do spread a bit.


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#6 love2travel

 
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Posted 21 April 2013 - 09:01 AM

If they can grow in my area, they can grow anywhere.  Honest.  They grow in northern Alberta!  I get them from the Farmer's Market sometimes.  My favourite thing to do with them is to make a mean roasted wild mushroom and sunchoke soup.


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#7 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 21 April 2013 - 12:27 PM

Yes, you could call it hashbrowns and I am going to check out the article.

http://www.bhg.com/g...alem-artichoke/


So you basically made hash browns with them?


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#8 foam

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 01:05 AM

Oh hey I totally forgot it's harvest time for artichokes, they grow wild all over my garden but I've never bothered eating them. Because I didn't know they were good for leaky guts until this year. They are a very invasive plant, super easy to grow, weed like actually!


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#9 Juliebove

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 12:41 AM

I'm glad they worked for you.  I can't touch the things.  Gave me the most horrid stomach pains and gas.


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#10 Pegleg84

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 01:08 PM

I've seen them at the organic market and the farmer's market in the summer, but never tried them. Now's time to give it a shot. And if they're tasty maybe I'll try growing some.

 

Thanks


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- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
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