Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Advice On Next Step?


  • Please log in to reply

2 replies to this topic

#1 allisonwilkins

 
allisonwilkins

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
 

Posted 21 April 2013 - 04:40 AM

I had genetic testing and fecal antibody testing done by Enterolabs about 1 1/2 years ago after suffering from GI type problems all my life.  I was a healthy weight but had chronic constipation, bloating, fatigue, muscle aches, migraines, among other things, so I decided to get tested.   My results were as follows:

 

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA    12 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

 

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test
HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1    0201   

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2    0602   

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ   2,1  (Subtype 2,6)

 

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing:  HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302)

 

I never fully understood the results but went off gluten mostly for the last 1 1/2 years, telling myself that I am gluten sensitive, but not celiac.  In January of this year, I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and decided that I needed to take the gluten issues more seriously.  I think I have been avoiding a celiac diagnosis because life is much easier that way.  I don't eat gluten, but I don't worry about cross-contamination and occasionally cheat by doing things like eating icing off a cake with a few cake crumbs on it.

 

Now, I am thinking that I need to do a gluten challenge and get blood work done so that I can't ignore what I need to do if I am indeed celiac.  I don't currently have a gastroenterologist and would like to get the testing done myself if possible.  We have a local lab service that offers the following tests on a walk-in basis.  

 

CELIAC DISEASE PANEL

 

TEST COMPONENTS:

The Celiac Disease Panel contains the following tests to measure autoantibodies that identify Celiac Disease:

  1. Anti-TTG Antibodies, IGA  -  Tissue Transglutaminase IgA
  2. Total IGA
  3. Anti-DGP, IGA  -  Gliadin (Deamidated) Antibody IgA

 

Does it sound like this is a good option for me?  Are these tests sufficient?  If I test positive, I will then go to a doctor to discuss the results, I was just hoping to cut out the middle step.  I appreciate any feedback.

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 Takala

 
Takala

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,555 posts
 

Posted 21 April 2013 - 01:22 PM

You are more likely to get a negative diagnosis anyway because you have been off of gluten for so long, unless you go back on gluten for a long time, even then, no guarantees at all, because damage takes a long time to create, so that still leaves you with the conundrum of what will it take to get you to stick with a gluten free diet. 


  • 0

#3 nvsmom

 
nvsmom

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,598 posts
 

Posted 21 April 2013 - 01:47 PM

Ditto Takala. You will need to eat gluten in moderate amounts (1-4 slices bread a day) for about 6 weeks (times vary) together a fairly accurate test. The DGP IgA or IgG will probably be the best test for you as they tend to test positive earlier into the damage than the ttg or EMA tests would (as I understand it). The older AGA tests can show up sooner too - the blood test is more medically accepted than the stool test.

I think it is wise of you to reassess how strict your gluten-free diet is, after testing is complete, since a cheat like icing can set you back a few weeks and keep you in a fairly unhealthy state if you do it once or twice a month. Even if you are"just" gluten sensitive, it is thought that eating gluten can cause inflammation that could exacerbate other conditions like hashi's... As I understand it anyways. :)

Best wishes to you and welcome to the board.
  • 0
Nicole Posted Image

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993
Celiac - June, 2012
Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: