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Gluten On Dishes? Being Too Careful?


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17 replies to this topic

#1 Laura.

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 06:36 AM

Hi Guys. I know this will probably sound like such a stupid question but I really need advice.

 

My family have gone (Almost) entirely gluten free but there are some things containing gluten that they still eat.

I've bought my own Plates, cutlery, bowls, frying pan, Spatula etc.

But often I'll find bits of food on my things & I get so worried that they could be gluten & spend ages washing them up before dinner just so I know they're safe to use & it gets so tiring.

I never want to cook myself anything anymore.

 

Am I being too careful here? Any advice?


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#2 Gemini

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:29 AM

Hi Laura,

     The one thing you have to be careful of is being too overly obsessed about things and it is very easy to do that in the beginning.  There is no need to use seperate dishes or utensils as long as you just give them a good wash after....and most people wash their dishes well after using them for a meal. Pots and pans need to be dedicated gluten-free if they are cast iron or a coated surface, such as Teflon, that may beome scratched.  If you are using stainless steel or enameled cast iron, as long as the enamel coating is not all scratched up, they are safe to use.  It might be wise to be prudent about spaghetti pots and have your own for that but most everything else can be shared as long as it's cleaned well. Wooden spoons or anything in a utensil that has a porous surface needs to be dedicated gluten-free.  But there is no need to have seperate everything if what you are using is stainless. I am an extremely sensitive celiac who gets horribley sick from crumbs and this method has never failed me.  It would be easier for you to have a dedicated area in the kitcen for the gluten eaters to use so most of the kitchen prep areas are gluten free. As the celiac, your needs have to come first because it's your health and then you won't have to worry about taking a hit.  Don't worry...this all becomes second nature as time goes on and then you will be able to relax a bit.  Just remember....porous surfaces, BAD.  Stainless steel.....GOOD!  :)

 

 

 

 


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#3 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 09:41 AM

Hey Laura!

 

I agree with everything Gemini says, especially the part about not getting too obsessive about this thing.

Stainless steel is not going to accumulate gluten.

 

If you are a good dishwasher (or your machine is! :)  ) there is not need to worry about it.

 

I replaced my plastic colander and I donated my bread machine. I also replaced the wooden cutting board I had used for a long time and

I tossed an old wooden pastry rolling pin, but kept the marble one I had.

 

Otherwise, I kept my pots and pans and stainless utensils, cutlery etc.  and I assure you, I have had no issues whatsoever. I have a stainless colander now and I love it. But my house is totally gluten-free

 

Like Gem, I am pretty sensitive and if there were any residual gluten lingering to bite me on the butt,   I'd know about it pronto. 

 

I have used the cutlery and plates in other people's homes (yes, those WEs  I know invite me for dinner and they do a damn good job keeping me safe because they took the time to learn about cross contamination) and I've never,ever  been sick as a result.

 

I hope this reassures you.

 

Anything else you need, just holler.


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#4 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 10:40 AM

If they are bits of food stuck to the utensils, rewash them for sure.  I carefully rinse mine before washing in hopes that the dishwater and dishwasher will not get gluten in them.  Then I wash them.  If they are not yet clean I rescrub them.  I believe even a little crumb or slime can be a problem.  Therefore, I think extreme caution is in order.


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#5 Gemini

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 11:35 AM

Thanks, Irish, for chiming in about the cutting board and colander!  I always forget something..... ;)


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#6 Takala

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 05:34 PM

I really do not understand the responses to the "I find bits of food on my things" which are claiming that noticing this, and re- washing it because of the possibility of cross contamination in a gluten- shared household, is being "overly obsessive."

 

I think this is borderline trolling behavior designed to elicit a protest, besides being bad advice.  Remember that slogan, "not even a crumb?" 

 

If you're sharing kitchen cookware or plates and utensils that were used with gluten, that are "supposed" to be clean, and they are not coming up "clean" for whatever reason (sloppy handwashing & rinsing by another person, or a malfunctioning dishwasher rinse cycle) to the point where you pick up a "clean" plate or a pot out of the cabinet, and there is something old and dried on there that you can actually see, (I mean, really, just eeeuwww :ph34r:  :blink:  )  then keep your kitchen stuff separate and on a shelf or in a cart or upper cabinet which is clearly marked, and it's for your use and no one else's.

 

If this is a dishwashing machine that is not getting dishes clean, start by telling the others they need to be really rinsing the dishes off before they get put into it, no matter what the directions say, and try switching dishwasher detergent brands.  I can't believe the crud I've seen on "washed" dishes that were just run thru a home dishwasher by people just assuming they could throw an unwashed, unrinsed dish into the thing.   I live on a well, not city water, and the minerals in this water just doesn't allow soap to lather up easily.  Other people will have the opposite problem, install a water conditioner, and their processed water will be "too" soft, and it just will NOT rinse effectively, no matter what.  For awhile we struggled with this, and ended up taking out the stupid water conditioner, I can outwit the hard water, but could not get things in the dishwasher, nor my hair in the shower, to ever rinse clean without leaving a lot of scum with the "softened" version. Yuck. yuck. yech. (you will notice in other posts I talk a lot about pure apple cider vinegar.... or baking soda.... we get a lot of use out of this here)  If you have a human relative that isn't very good with the handwashing & rinsing dishes routine, just keep your stuff separate, and wash your own.  You can also volunteer to be the person who picks up the dishes after the meal, and rinses them before they load into the dishwasher.  It is exasperating, but trying to get the culprit to notice this problem is sometimes an exercise in futility. We were taught as children to hand rinse anything first, that was going to either the sink to be washed, or to be loaded into the dishwasher, and woe unto them that didn't, so it's just a habit.  I mean, nobody, really wants to see dishes that aren't clean. 


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#7 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 06:08 PM

I beg your pardon, but my reasonable response is not "trolling".  It's  just common sense.

 

If you notice a dish or a fork is dirty, you rewash it.  No big deal. 

 

It's nothing to freak out over and it is certainly nothing worth "obsessing" over.

 

The OP asked if she should worry about it and "spend ages" on washing things.

 

The answer is no. 

 

Whether it's caked on egg or some dried on gravy, you wash the dish or fork or whatever and it's fine.

 

Why are you picking a bone when there isn't one? Let it go.


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#8 GottaSki

 
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Posted 22 April 2013 - 06:30 PM

We evolved into a completely gluten-free kitchen -- during the transition we had separate cookware and utensils for things that touched gluten -- some have separate cookware and utensils for the gluten-free items -- either way is good.  Again, for me -- plates and utensils become clean with washing and I never worried about them.

 

I found the advice offered answered the OP question quite well -- trolling has nothing to do with honest answers to a question posed here.

 

PS>>>edited to add -- Welcome Laura - that was not a stupid question - hang out and make sure to read the "Newbie 101" thread and feel free to ask more questions :)


Edited by GottaSki, 22 April 2013 - 06:54 PM.

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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#9 Gemini

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 07:45 AM

Takala.......your protestations of us giving bad advice are getting old.  I would never give bad advice to another Celiac...just good, common sense, educated advice.  Otherwise, people will become overly obsessed and paranoid and they don't need that added to their learning curve of being a new celiac.  They need to know that they can live a totally normal life and common sense is a strong requirement of that.  Soap and water go a long way to making things safe for us and no, don't even go there about gluten free soap unless you don't rinse your dishes after you wash them........although I have yet to find any dish soap with gluten.  <_< 


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#10 dilettantesteph

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:14 AM

Takala.......your protestations of us giving bad advice are getting old.  I would never give bad advice to another Celiac...just good, common sense, educated advice.  Otherwise, people will become overly obsessed and paranoid and they don't need that added to their learning curve of being a new celiac.  They need to know that they can live a totally normal life and common sense is a strong requirement of that.  Soap and water go a long way to making things safe for us and no, don't even go there about gluten free soap unless you don't rinse your dishes after you wash them........although I have yet to find any dish soap with gluten.  <_<

 

This dish soap contains gluten:

http://www.ecover.co...hwashing liquid

 

It still should only be a problem for those of us who are more sensitive.

 

As far as dish washing goes, I think that it depends on how sensitive you are and maybe also how careful your family members are and how good your dishwasher is.  In our case, we have very sensitive family members and we had to go to a gluten free household to avoid symptoms.  I can't know if the problem was the dishes or if there were other causes. 


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#11 kareng

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:26 AM

This dish soap contains gluten:
http://www.ecover.co...hwashing liquid
 
It still should only be a problem for those of us who are more sensitive.
 
As far as dish washing goes, I think that it depends on how sensitive you are and maybe also how careful your family members are and how good your dishwasher is.  In our case, we have very sensitive family members and we had to go to a gluten free household to avoid symptoms.  I can't know if the problem was the dishes or if there were other causes.


Fortunately, that isn't a very common dish soap. And, fortunately, the common ones like Dawn, do not add gluten. This brand appears to give the ingredients so one could make a choice.
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#12 mommyof4

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 10:06 AM

Hi Laura!

 

Welcome to this forum.  No question is ever stupid, and this is a great place to get answers from experienced people.  :)  It is overwhelming to figure this g.free thing out at first, but just like some others posted, it will become second nature with time. 

 

When I was first diagnosed with Celiac in the Fall of 2011, I remember having that fear of constant cross contamination...especially when you live in a household of gluten eaters too.(I have a hubby & 4 kids...only one child has to eat g.free).  I had to figure this out without driving myself & my family crazy.  It has actually turned out to be a great learning experience for all of us...it just takes time.

 

Make sure you have your own toaster, own butter dish(I keep my butter in a seperate cupboard), & own foods that are jar dipped(like p.butter, mayo, etc).  I use all the same dishes & utensils for eating.  I bake with the same cake pans, muffin tins, frying pans, etc...I just make sure everything is washed well.  I found, with time, that most of my baking is g.free anyways just because I don't want to make 2 different meals or treats.  I like the advice about the colander & teflon vs. stainless steel pans...I hadn't thought of that. 

 

Anyways, good luck...you will get this down, just relax & give yourself time.          


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#13 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 11:27 AM

 I found, with time, that most of my baking is g.free anyways just because I don't want to make 2 different meals or treats.  I like the advice about the colander & teflon vs. stainless steel pans...I hadn't thought of that. 

 

Anyways, good luck...you will get this down, just relax & give yourself time.          

 

Now, that's a smart momma! The gluten-free treats and meals are delicious so, why make two of everything?! More work for you.

 

You've done an awesome  job of acclimating to this "new normal", IMHO.Congrats!  :)

 

 

In time, it will be second nature. I honestly never think about celiac and "gluten free" ( unless I am talking with other celiacs, of course) . It's just "life" now.


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#14 Gemini

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 11:41 AM

This dish soap contains gluten:

http://www.ecover.co...hwashing liquid

 

It still should only be a problem for those of us who are more sensitive.

 

As far as dish washing goes, I think that it depends on how sensitive you are and maybe also how careful your family members are and how good your dishwasher is.  In our case, we have very sensitive family members and we had to go to a gluten free household to avoid symptoms.  I can't know if the problem was the dishes or if there were other causes. 

No...I really have to disagree on this one.  I am extremely sensitive but I really think this has nothing to do with sensitivity at all. Even if you did find a dish soap with gluten in it, most people rinse their dishes well after washing.  I don't know about you, but I really hate the taste of soap..... it's downright gag-able.  Eating soap or soap residue is not all that healthy to do on a regular basis.  Plus, most dish soaps, if not all, are formulated to rinse clean or use a rinsing agent that will remove 99.9 or 100% of the residue.  If you rinse your dishes after sudsing up, there should be no problem, even for the most sensitive among us, which includes me.  Not everything can be blamed on sensitivity. 


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#15 GottaSki

 
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Posted 23 April 2013 - 12:06 PM

No...I really have to disagree on this one.  I am extremely sensitive but I really think this has nothing to do with sensitivity at all. Even if you did find a dish soap with gluten in it, most people rinse their dishes well after washing.  I don't know about you, but I really hate the taste of soap..... it's downright gag-able.  Eating soap or soap residue is not all that healthy to do on a regular basis.  Plus, most dish soaps, if not all, are formulated to rinse clean or use a rinsing agent that will remove 99.9 or 100% of the residue.  If you rinse your dishes after sudsing up, there should be no problem, even for the most sensitive among us, which includes me.  Not everything can be blamed on sensitivity. 

 

Ditto...super duper sensitive for three of six in our family -- four years and have yet to have a problem with our dishes -- except for early days when our German exchange student refused to understand why he had to use a certain pot for "his" pasta ;)

 

and that wasn't a dishwashing issue -- it was a laziness issue on his part!!!


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)





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