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#1 kcorcoran2013

 
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Posted 27 April 2013 - 07:50 AM

If you have a goiter in your thyroid that has been caused by hashimoto's syndrome, and you have all or part of your thyroid removed, does that cure the hashimoto's?

 


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#2 nvsmom

 
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Posted 28 April 2013 - 06:22 PM

Not usually. :(
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#3 kcorcoran2013

 
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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:29 AM

Thanks for the response.  I didn't think it did, but I had a doctor tell be that it did.  I thought I'd ask people who REALLY know; i.e. people who actually have the disorder! =)

 

So than, what is the best way to manage it?  My symptoms are not severe, but I am so tired of struggling with my, not constant low energy but bouts of it!  I was hoping that going gluten-free would make a noticeable difference, but it has been 2 months and I have not seen any change in that area.


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#4 VeggieGal

 
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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:52 AM

Are you dx as celiac? 2 months gluten free is still early days, it can take along time for your intestines to heal before you start absorbing nutrients. Have you had your iron and B12 levels checked? I had my thyroid removed due to graves and now I'm on the right dosage of levothyroxine apparentely...but l agree with nvsmom. I suffer with severe fatigue but its very slowly improving. I'm hoping its down to celiac, so that hopefully...eventually I'll start to heal (its been 4 months for me). Are you taking probiotics and digestive enzymes? If not, have a look at Newbie 101 on here for some helpful tips. Good luck
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#5 kcorcoran2013

 
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Posted 29 April 2013 - 01:05 PM

I have been gluten intolerant for 20plus years.  I tested negative for celiac about 5 yrs ago but was on meds that kept me from throwing up.  At the time I thought that was all I needed to do but my more recent research has shown me that many of my other health issues have been from the gluten intolerance.  So, I gave up the medicine for a gluten free diet.  Now that I know about the hashimoto's I am trying to figure out my next step.  I just had my annual physical and the Dr. tested for vitamin D (which I have been deficient in before), vitamin B12, and several of the thyroid tests.  I have been hearing about the probiotics and enzymes and will have to try those.  I also am thinking about going to an endo. doctor to see what they may have to say.


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#6 VeggieGal

 
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Posted 29 April 2013 - 01:31 PM

Its definately worth seeing an endo and maybe see if theres alternative meds if you still need them. I'm also vit d deficient which is needed to absorb calcium. On the plus, at least you've identified being gluten-free to be helping some of your other health issues...may you continue in your healing :)
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#7 nvsmom

 
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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:16 PM

When you get your thyroid tests done, make sure you get copies of your labs and don't take your doctor's declaration of "normal results" to stop you from getting care you need. My doctor keeps saying I am normal - he's been saying that as soon as my TSH dropped below a 6. I just tell him I'm upping my doses now and check in every 8 weeks for test results ... he's an idiot. Anyway, a lot of them do that. I sugest researching your own results and symptoms too.

 

As for the tests:

TSH - should be close to a 1

Free T4 and Free T3 - should be in the 50-75% portion of your lab's normal reference range

TPO Ab - should be pretty low even within the normal range

 

Hashi's takes a long time to get sorted. I was diagnosed back in August and I am finally getting my labs closer to where I want to try them, and just starting to feel some improvement in symptoms.  Darn fatigue is still there.

 

Best wishes.


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#8 kcorcoran2013

 
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Posted 01 May 2013 - 03:47 PM

The Drs office told me today that all of my bloodwork was normal.  I asked them to mail me a copy of it so I could see the ranges.  When I get it I will compare my numbers with what nvsmom  says they should be and go from there.  Thanks!


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#9 Ksee

 
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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:23 PM

The Drs office told me today that all of my bloodwork was normal.  I asked them to mail me a copy of it so I could see the ranges.  When I get it I will compare my numbers with what nvsmom  says they should be and go from there.  Thanks!

Hashimoto's Thyrotoxicosis is an autoimmune process. That means your body is over-reacting and treating your own tissues as foreign. Celiac is another autoimmune process. When you body begins attacking itself there can be tissue damage in more than one part of the body.

In one respect, removing the thyroid does not "fix" the problem but it is a treatment. Removing the thyroid gives you a stable endocrine system that can be supplemented accurately and appropriately which is what your doctor was trying to explain. Your doctor does understand what is going on.

Endocrine problems are like ripples in a pond. Toss a stone in a pond and wait a couple of minutes before looking at the ripples. Now try to sort out where all the ripples have come from. Sorting out endocrine issues is a bit like those ripples because it's difficult and takes a lot of training to understand how all the body systems are affected by changes and imbalances.

Last I looked, the standard low range was a TSH of 5.8. There are other factors controlling TSH that can cause your levels to become low. Labs across the country do not use a standardized level in many cases which is why all lab results are printed with the range from that particular lab.

All this is very complicated like those ripples in the pond. I'm wondering who diagnosed you in the beginning and did your surgery? You can take matters in your own hands many times but with endocrine problems, find a good endocrinologist and until then please keep working with your doctor and follow that advise. Anything else is risking your health.  .


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#10 Gemini

 
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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:57 AM

Hashimoto's Thyrotoxicosis is an autoimmune process. That means your body is over-reacting and treating your own tissues as foreign. Celiac is another autoimmune process. When you body begins attacking itself there can be tissue damage in more than one part of the body.

In one respect, removing the thyroid does not "fix" the problem but it is a treatment. Removing the thyroid gives you a stable endocrine system that can be supplemented accurately and appropriately which is what your doctor was trying to explain. Your doctor does understand what is going on.

Endocrine problems are like ripples in a pond. Toss a stone in a pond and wait a couple of minutes before looking at the ripples. Now try to sort out where all the ripples have come from. Sorting out endocrine issues is a bit like those ripples because it's difficult and takes a lot of training to understand how all the body systems are affected by changes and imbalances.

Last I looked, the standard low range was a TSH of 5.8. There are other factors controlling TSH that can cause your levels to become low. Labs across the country do not use a standardized level in many cases which is why all lab results are printed with the range from that particular lab.

All this is very complicated like those ripples in the pond. I'm wondering who diagnosed you in the beginning and did your surgery? You can take matters in your own hands many times but with endocrine problems, find a good endocrinologist and until then please keep working with your doctor and follow that advise. Anything else is risking your health.  .

 You do not need an endocrinologist to maintain a healthy thyroid level.  I dropped them because they really are clueless about thyroid disease and have a bad habit of only checking thyroid using TSH.  That is what I would define as risking your health.

 

There are a few people on here who really know thyroid issues well....better than most doctors.  Of course you have to make use of doctors so you can have your blood work checked but if a doctor is giving you bad advice, then you ask those with experience in the matter and include their comments and suggestions accordingly.  They can then take that advice back to your doctor and push for better treatment.  If the doctor refuses to listen, then you know you need another one.  Anyone who solely relies on an endocrinologist or a PCP for thyroid treatment is making a mistake....unless you hit the jackpot and pick a doctor who knows what they are doing.  Those are much rarer than you think.  People need to educate themselves well on thyroid disease if they have it because doctors are notorious for under treating the condition, which is dangerous.

 

I will say that for myself, staying strictly long term gluten-free will help thyroid issues in many cases.  Once you remove the source of aggravation to your immune system, it has a profound effect on other AI conditions.  It's all about inflammation.  If your thyroid has been removed, it is really essential that you supplement with thyoid hormone that contains both T3 and T4...another thing many doctors fail to do.  Suppressing TSH is another method which can work very well in balancing your thyroid hormones and bringing antibody levels into the normal range.  The only numbers you need to follow after diagnosis are the free T3 and T4, and then include the antibody testing to make sure those come down into normal range.  I think that may not apply to someone who has had their thyroid removed, though.  Checking TSH is for diagnosis purposes only...not to maintain levels after diagnosis.


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#11 VeggieGal

 
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Posted 02 May 2013 - 12:52 PM

You do not need an endocrinologist to maintain a healthy thyroid level. I dropped them because they really are clueless about thyroid disease and have a bad habit of only checking thyroid using TSH. That is what I would define as risking your health.

There are a few people on here who really know thyroid issues well....better than most doctors. Of course you have to make use of doctors so you can have your blood work checked but if a doctor is giving you bad advice, then you ask those with experience in the matter and include their comments and suggestions accordingly. They can then take that advice back to your doctor and push for better treatment. If the doctor refuses to listen, then you know you need another one. Anyone who solely relies on an endocrinologist or a PCP for thyroid treatment is making a mistake....unless you hit the jackpot and pick a doctor who knows what they are doing. Those are much rarer than you think. People need to educate themselves well on thyroid disease if they have it because doctors are notorious for under treating the condition, which is dangerous.

I will say that for myself, staying strictly long term gluten-free will help thyroid issues in many cases. Once you remove the source of aggravation to your immune system, it has a profound effect on other AI conditions. It's all about inflammation. If your thyroid has been removed, it is really essential that you supplement with thyoid hormone that contains both T3 and T4...another thing many doctors fail to do. Suppressing TSH is another method which can work very well in balancing your thyroid hormones and bringing antibody levels into the normal range. The only numbers you need to follow after diagnosis are the free T3 and T4, and then include the antibody testing to make sure those come down into normal range. I think that may not apply to someone who has had their thyroid removed, though. Checking TSH is for diagnosis purposes only...not to maintain levels after diagnosis.


Hi Gemini, you mentioned that someone who's had their thyroid removed should supplement with T3. I've read this before somewhere, but like you said, getting an endo or doctor to listen is impossible!! So I really don't have a choice and just have to put up with the T4 only :(
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#12 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:36 PM

Hi Gemini, you mentioned that someone who's had their thyroid removed should supplement with T3. I've read this before somewhere, but like you said, getting an endo or doctor to listen is impossible!! So I really don't have a choice and just have to put up with the T4 only :(

You can order labs from online labs. Your bloodwork will be processed at a lab like LabCorp.

You can also find a doc who treats thyroid based on how you feel, not labs. It takes alot of work and kissing lots of frogs, but it can be done.

Call a compiunding pharmacy near you and ask for a reco for a doc who regularly prescribes t3 or natural therapy. They will know.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#13 VeggieGal

 
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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:51 PM

You can order labs from online labs. Your bloodwork will be processed at a lab like LabCorp.

You can also find a doc who treats thyroid based on how you feel, not labs. It takes alot of work and kissing lots of frogs, but it can be done.

Call a compiunding pharmacy near you and ask for a reco for a doc who regularly prescribes t3 or natural therapy. They will know.


Thanks pricklypear, I'm in the uk, so not sure if thats possible? but I will certainly look into it :)

When I asked my doctor about it a year ago, (incidentally, I was naughty and i added ft3 and ft4 to the blood test form), he said that all levels were ok and my body was converting to t3. But he never measured rt3 ...oh I don't know, its frustrating !
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#14 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:57 PM

Thanks pricklypear, I'm in the uk, so not sure if thats possible? but I will certainly look into it :)

When I asked my doctor about it a year ago, (incidentally, I was naughty and i added ft3 and ft4 to the blood test form), he said that all levels were ok and my body was converting to t3. But he never measured rt3 ...oh I don't know, its frustrating !


Here's a dirty little secret. Find any quack who will write a script - in the US we have legitimate Naturapaths and then we have quacks - it's best to find a legit doc, but if it comes down to it, find a fool who will legally write an rx and get one.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#15 VeggieGal

 
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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:54 PM

Here's a dirty little secret. Find any quack who will write a script - in the US we have legitimate Naturapaths and then we have quacks - it's best to find a legit doc, but if it comes down to it, find a fool who will legally write an rx and get one.


Lol sometimes we just have to bend the rules !
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