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Problems With Dairy?
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My daughter was diagnosed with Celiac a year and a half ago...She is 6. Lately she has been having tummy aches again, but I know she's not sick....It is just like it was when we first found out, but not as bad....Anyhow, I racked my brain thinking about what she could have possibly been consuming that has gluten in it, but can not come up with anything.....But she does eat a lot of dairy. She has never had problems with dairy before, even right after her endoscopy. Is there a way she can be tested for lactose intolerance, and is that common with Celiacs?

 

-Katie

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Initially gluten and dairy are offen suggested to eliminate.  And when the villi are healed, dairy can be introduced successfully. And many here have recognized additional intollerances over time.

 

I am sure you have already reviewed her possible gluten intake (perhaps school or a friends house) and then, go very dairy light for a couple of weeks.  Take one step at a time, so if there is a resolve, you can pin point the problem.

 

Too much dairy for me will make me very uncomfortable, but does not cause me pain. But I know that I cannot eat what I used to eat.  I'm dairly light. Maybe, I have a mild intolerance.

 

And yes, there are allergy tests, but I am not familiar with tests  for children.  Others will post.

 

I have often admired parents with children that have Celiac, or any other "issue".  It is truely a devotion above most others.

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Dairy products like ice cream and cottage cheese and yogurt have alot of other ingredients mixed in them.

There could be gluten in that list or she's reacting to some other ingredient.

Once when I switched yogurt brands to one that had a lot more ingredients, my pain returned.

 

She could have Lactose intolerance or a Casein intolerance or whey protein intolerance.

 

Search:  "Bovine Beta Casein Enteropathy" 

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My daughter was diagnosed with Celiac a year and a half ago...She is 6. Lately she has been having tummy aches again, but I know she's not sick....It is just like it was when we first found out, but not as bad....Anyhow, I racked my brain thinking about what she could have possibly been consuming that has gluten in it, but can not come up with anything.....But she does eat a lot of dairy. She has never had problems with dairy before, even right after her endoscopy. Is there a way she can be tested for lactose intolerance, and is that common with Celiacs?

 

-Katie

My 12 year old daughter had to go off milk - she can still eat yogurt etc.  She also gets tummy aches from eggs.  She ate both of these things before.  So not sure why, but we've switched to almond milk and things have improved dramatically.

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Personally, I think most of the world's population has issues with dairy products (ie - breastmilk of cows that is not designed to be eaten by anything other than calves). I have read that mammals of all species tend to stop making lactase (or, at least, adequate amounts of it to digest milk) during childhood as adult mammals do not require breastmilk beyond infancy / early childhood.

My eldest is dairy free, and made great improvements once it was removed from his diet. Now, my whole house is dairy free, and my youngest (now 8 months) will never drink cow's milk.

Almond milk is a real hit around here. I also love coconut milk.

And don't worry about calcium - green leafy veggies, soy, almond milk, etc etc are all great sources of calcium. And they're easier to absorb than the calcium in cow's milk (which is designed to be absorbed by baby cows, not humans).

Ok, anti-dairy rant over. ;-)

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Good dairy rant.  :D  And I agree with all of it. There really is no biological need to drink a cow's breast milk. Eliminating it is worth a shot.

 

There could be another food intolerance. Corn, rice, soy and nightshades are often culprits as well as artificial colouring or sweeteners. Perhaps keeping a food and symptom  journal will help you sort out what is at fault in her diet... because I'm sure that you are not busy enough, right?  ;)

 

Best wishes. I hope you figure it out soon.

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Hi!  You are not alone...I have a 6.5 year old little girl who developed tummy aches over 8 months ago.  We have eliminated a TON of things and haven't found an answer yet.  Here are some things that we did discover were triggers for "big" tummy aches (she has pain all day, every day though...).  She did have a "KUB" xray which showed she was constipated and we have followed "protocol" very well on that front and still she has no relief from her pain.

 

- Ruled out gluten cross contamination (we have a dedicated gluten-free house because 3/4 of us have Celiac and we homeschool, so I know what she'd exposed to...).  We confirmed this by doing another round of bloodwork

- Ruled out parasites (like Giardia) via bloodwork

- Ruled out fructose malabsorption by doing a lengthy (2 month) low fructose diet

- Ruled out SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth) by doing a breath test

- Ruled out various things through an abdominal ultrasound

- Ruled out ovarian cysts through a lower abdominal ultrasound

 

Dietary changes we've adopted:

- No cows milk.  Only goat milk products in moderation.  We rely more on coconut milk these days when a recipe calls for something of the sort.

- No grains of any kind. 

- No polyols (look up FODMAP) so no sorbitol and other "ol" ending sweeteners

- No avocado (a trigger food for her, interestingly high naturally in polyols)

- No nightshades (tomato is a BIG trigger for her).  Between going gluten-free and nightshade free the good news is she has no muscle/joint pain.

- No legumes of any kind.

 

We have pretty much adopted a paleo - type diet.

 

Things I'm still sorting out:

- Does she have an egg sensitivity?  (I did two weeks off with maybe light improvement...still deciding what to do next)

- Could she have a histamine intolerance?

- Is her gut flora ok?  (We have added in sauerkraut and tons of probiotics...)

- Does she have an anatomical abnormality?

 

xoxo to you and your little girl...hope we both find answers soon!!!

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    • She (your PCP)  can order a celiac blood panel.  It might not be a complete panel, but it's a start.  Any medical doctor can order one.  A GI is needed for the endoscopy (ulcers, Celiac disease, h.pylori, etc.), HIDA scan (gallbladder)  or colonoscopy (IBS).   Since you just saw her, email/call/write a letter and ask her to order (lab) the celiac panel.  You could go to the lab before or after work.  Pretty easy!  
    • I just now saw the second reply and I see what you mean. Again, the issue is that I may have to go with the gluten until close to the end of the year.

      However, an idea did just come to mind, and that is, can my primary care doctor do such a test? I had normal blood work done, but they didn't really say anything about testing for celiacs. I can get an appointment with my primary care doctor much sooner than a GI.

      When I was talking to my PCP last, I asked her what I should expect as far as testing goes or what she may have been concerned about. Her reply was about a HIDA scan for the gallbladder but also any test needed in case of IBS or Celiacs. Just the way she threw that in there like an after thought and left me hanging kinda had me worried.
    • I am not a doctor that's for sure.  So, I can't even answer your questions.  If you know you have pre-diabetes, you probably are working with a doctor.  Can you email them and ask for a celiac blood panel?   You can work on the weight loss and diabetes -- that you can handle yourself now and take action.  I have diabetes and my glucose readings are fairly normal now without medication and I'm thin.  Being overweight does not cause diabetes.  It's either autoimmune (type 1) or you become insulin resistant (type 2).  You can cut out all sugar and  processed stuff ASAP to help take action and start walking 10,000 steps (helps with the insulin resistance).    But the prediabetes is not going to kill you in the next year.  Whatever's in your gut is more likely going to get you much sooner.  But heck, I'm not a doctor and I don't even know you!    
    • Hi Steph, Yes, celiac disease can cause a myriad of symptoms and damage to the body,  Have you completed all celiac disease testing?  Usually they do the blood antibodies test first and then do an endoscopy.   You shouldn't go gluten-free until all testing is completed. Gluten is in many processed foods.  But if you stick with whole foods it is not hard to avoid gluten.  Getting used to eating gluten-free may take some time, as we need to adjust our preferences in diet.  But there are many foods that are naturally gluten-free.  Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye and barley.  Some celiac disease organizations recommend avoiding oats also for the first 18 months of the gluten-free diet. Celiac disease impairs the ability of the body to absorb nutrients (including vitamins).  That can make it hard for the body to maintain itself and heal/repair damage.  So celiac can easily impact any part of the body. Sardines, tuna, mackeral and salmon have good amounts of vitamin D in them.  There are supplements available also, but not all are good.  You can check them at the labdoor website.  Nature Made is a good one and not expensive.  Internal damage from celiac can cause liver issues.  Those will probably clear up after being on the gluten-free diet a while. Recovery from celiac can take  months, and can be a rocky road.  The more you stick with whole foods and avoid cross-contamination issues the sooner you will heal IMHO. You may find that dairy causes problems for your digestion at first.  But it make stop being a problem after you have healed up some. welcome to the forum!
    • Will this be dangerous considering how long I have to wait for any testing? I may not even get a blood test in November but here is hoping. I just worry having to wait so long will cause serious issues, not to mention delay of weight loss which I need for the pre-diabetes. Do ulcers have a chance to cause yellow stools though? I suppose a stool test will be needed for that for any signs of blood in stools but visually it does not seem so. The biggest issue is not knowing what else could be causing the yellow stools as this would not be a diabetic or ulcer thing. And without negative signs on the gallbladder or liver, it is narrowing down the list.

      At the very least this is making me assume I can wait on a final scan of gallbladder and attempt blood tests and endoscopy if they recommend it.
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