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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity

Gene Tests Results For Me And My Children

3 posts in this topic

I have been gluten free for over a year and am currently doing a gluten challenge for blood tests.  I had gene tests done for myself and both my teenagers and we all show 3 positive gene alleles for gluten sensitivity.  My children do not have any symptoms at this time.


I plan on going back on a gluten free diet after the blood tests no matter what, but my children are resisting.  I am looking for some good information to pass along to them to use as they get older and are no longer under my dietary control as to what they can expect as far as gluten sensitivity, odds of celiac, etc.   Can someone give me insight as to what these tests mean?


Thank you.


Our results are:




DQA1:  0501 (HLA-DQ2)  Positive

DQB1:  0201 (HLA-DQ2)  Positive

DQB1:  0602 (HLA-DQ1)  Positive


Both kids:


DQA1:  0301 (HLA-DQ8)  Positive

DQB1:  0302 (HLA-DQ8)  Positive

DQB1:  0602  (HLA-DQ1)  Positive


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I personally do not know much about genetic testing.  As I understand it, a positive gene test only means that you have some of the genes often seen in celiacs but it is no garuntee that you will develop celiac disease, or if you or your children will. As you know, to find out if you have celiac disease you need to have the blood tests and/or the endoscopy done. they are occassionally a false negative but it isn't all that common, especially if you eat gluten for the month or two prior to testing, and you have many tests run. (It is VERY rare to have all tests show up positive so a variety of tests -both IgA and IgG - is often best).


Good luck! And good luck with the kids... I'm almost dreading when mine are old enough to start deciding things for themslevs...


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Hi, there are good charts at wikipedia!



Basics: people have two beta chains and two alpha chains. 


Even having half a DQ2,5 gene, 05* increases the risk for celiac just as an example. You have DQ2,5 and DQ6 (which was called DQ1 before, because DQ5 and DQ6 have 01* in the alpha chain and they could not discriminate between them)


Children: Here we have DQ8 and DQ6. They inherited your DQ6 and father´s DQ8.

(strange with DQ1, usually labs are not looking for it, so either they looked for it for some other reason (looking for diabetes genes or whatever) or they just reported it.)


DQ8 is the other official celiac gene, the most common one is DQ2,5 , the one you have one copy of.


DQ8 and risk for celiac: the risk for developing celiac is a bit less than with DQ2. They still should be tested every two or three years with the ordinary blood tests for celiac.


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