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Sandwich Bread For Kids
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We're totally new to gluten-free and I'm looking for a sandwich bread that my kids will eat and/or tolerate. Prior to gluten-free we ate standard 100% whole wheat, so they're okay not having the texture and sweetness of white bread. They are 2 & 4 years old, my 4 year old especially loves his pb&j! Premade would be fantastic but if anyone knows of an awesome mix I'd give it a try. Thanks!

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I use corn tortillas. Not the same, but they do make good wraps.

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My girls love schar bread, its sold on the shelf at our store and nice and soft. Only problem is it has to be eaten fairly quick because there are no preservatives in it.

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We use Canyon Bakehouse when we are in need of bread. It's very expensive though so we only use it when we absolutely need bread!

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Yes, Canyon Bakehouse is (IMO) the very best gluten-free bread on the market. It's expensive, but so good! Udi's multi-grain is good too. It tastes more like french bread to me, but it cost slightly less than the Canyon Bakehouse.

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i haven't had canyon bakehouse (and now i want it lolz) but udi's or rudi's breads are good - love the schar, too, and theirs comes in different varieties (like rolls) i haven't tried those yet.  my grandkids eat the sliced bread (udi's rudi's or schar) and they like it.  

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NotMe, if you like Rudi's, you'll LOVE Canyon Bakehouse. The taste is similar but Canyon Bakehouse doesn't fall apart like Rudi's does.

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Buy a gluten-free baking book and make your own.  My 10 yo likes Udi's, but she likes my home made bread a lot better.  

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Thank you! I found a store near my college that sells Canyon Bakehouse, I'm going to try it first since so many of you seem to like it. If the kids like it too then that's probably what we'll have around until I can figure out how to start baking some decent gluten-free bread on my own to save money.

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Buy a gluten-free baking book and make your own.  My 10 yo likes Udi's, but she likes my home made bread a lot better.  

 

Is there a particular book you recommend? Sadly I'm pretty new to cooking from scratch, we relied heavily on processed/boxed meals and restaurants before the gluten-free switch this week. I have some time this weekend and want to get some good cookbooks to have on hand, but I'm hoping to find some that start at a simple/beginner's level.

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i have a couple of cookbooks, but i don't like *all* the recipes in any one particular book - i don't have a 'go-to' - the interwebs have been mighty handy.  a huge help because you can not only get recipes on the web, most times you can read/give feedback, adjustments or variations.  you might want to check out the baking/cooking section of this forum :)  maybe ask the cookbook question there - there are cooks/bakers on pretty much every level from beginner to accomplished.  

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After trying every gluten free bread on the market and gluten free flours I was told about 'Maninis Gluten free flour' and I have to say it makes bread that taste exacly like the wheat bread I remember. I am sold, it's really that good! We made the 'Miracolo Pane Classic Peasant Bread Mix' and it's like regular white bread and it smells heavenly while baking.

 

 

 
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I don't like canyon house as much as udi's and my daughter (not the gluten free one) has either a bagel or pb&j sandwich from udi's bagels or bread every day.

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Jorona...I would recommend a cookbook called gluten-free Makeovers by Beth Hillson. Of all my many glutenfree cookbooks this one by far has been the most helpful to me even with using a bread machine. The author even has the same brand and model bread machine as me.

There is also a section in the back of the book where substitutions for things are listed...most helpful to me  since I also can't have corn, soy, oats, or lactose.

For an all purpose glutenfree blend she gives the amounts or rice flour, and corn or potato starch, and tapioca starch. Most of her bread, cake and self-rising blends contain a certain percent of sweet white sorghum flour. Because of her I started using sorghum flour and it really makes a big difference to me as I especially like the taste of the bread I make using it rather than just using the rice, potato and tapioca starch blend which seem to me are just pure starch.

The publisher of the book is Lifelong Books and the price somewhere around $19 but I bought mine on sale from a place called Edward R. Hamilton Discount Books and so paid considerably less for it.

And since you are new to glutenfree baking I would like to prepare you for failures at it as they seem to happen to everyone new at glutenfree baking. Just hang in there and keep trying. :)

And ask questions here as you need to as many people here will try to be helpful to you.

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We're totally new to gluten-free and I'm looking for a sandwich bread that my kids will eat and/or tolerate. Prior to gluten-free we ate standard 100% whole wheat, so they're okay not having the texture and sweetness of white bread. They are 2 & 4 years old, my 4 year old especially loves his pb&j! Premade would be fantastic but if anyone knows of an awesome mix I'd give it a try. Thanks!

My cousin who's gluten-free (and fairly picky) has raved to me about Schar before. When it comes to mixes, I know Gluten Free Pantry carries a great mix specifically for sandwich bread. 

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