Jump to content





   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

gluten-free Sf In Rural Town - Kill Me Now.

gluten free soy free rural

  • Please log in to reply

11 replies to this topic

#1 bcanela

 
bcanela

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
 

Posted 01 May 2013 - 09:49 AM

So after being diagnosed with gluten intolerance a year and a half ago I feel a ton better however I was still having episodes in which I felt like I ate gluten but everything I ate was gluten-free. After a really bad episode, I decided to try Soy free for a week to see if my intolerance was actually soy, not gluten. No such luck. Now I am trying gluten-free, SF and I feel a million times better, but I'm having quite the time trying to find gluten-free, SF foods at the local Fry's or Albertsons in my rural town of Yuma, AZ. I'm also having a ton of trouble because unlike every blogger that has gluten-free, SF recipies out there, I physically don't have the time, money or resources to make everything from scratch every day! I'm looking for a list of products that I can find at my local grocery store (not Whole Foods, Trader Joes, etc - they don't have any natural food stores here) that are naturally gluten-free & SF. I prefer not to spend a ton of money on shipping (as most online natural food stores do) so quick, easy meals that I can create from normal products would be helpful. I'm also not a vegetarian, but very picky with my meats so suggesting I buy meats and veggies doesn't help. Thats an obvious answer. Thanks so much for your help on this!!


  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 bartfull

 
bartfull

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,465 posts
 

Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:33 AM

What is it you're looking for? Breads? Sunshine Herbs and More at 11274 S Fortuna Rd # K YUMA, AZ, 85367 (928) 342-1123

carries Udi's products. Their multi-grain bread is great. Their double chocolate muffins are UNBELIEVABLY good!

 

I'm sure that same store has plenty of other gluten-free products.

 

As a matter of fact, I googled health food stores, Yuma Arizona, and I think 5 of them came up. I'd bet if you do the same you will find there is one near you. If you go in and ask, they will probably be able to show you a large selection. :)


  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#3 Celiac Mindwarp

 
Celiac Mindwarp

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,167 posts
 

Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:34 AM

Rice, potatoes eggs? I cook these in advance and heat then in the microwave, or stir fry. I cook other stuff from fresh every day, and usually take 10 to 12 minutes.

The only gluten-free foods I buy are rice pasta and rice spaghetti.

Everything else is regular.

Just takes time to get your head round it.

Good luck, keep asking questions :)
  • 0
- Symptoms from 2001, maybe before. Across 20+ years, these have included, vomiting, D, migraines, headaches, recurrent miscarriage, inflammation problems (failure to heal from injuries) brain fog, anxiety and more!
- Elimination diet using Atkins, 2003 – excluded wheat, caffeine, quorn. 2005, excluded sesame, alcohol
- Started diagnosis route April 2012, blood tests, endoscopy – said negative, gluten challenge, clearly something very wrong, had to stop after 3 weeks.
- Gluten Free, August 2012, Corn Free, September 2012. Removed most processed gluten free foods.
- Genetic testing, December 2012 – negative – Diagnosis – Non Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI)
- Elimination diet, January 2013 – all of the above plus dairy, legumes, all grains, sugar, additives, white potatoes, soy. Reintroducing sloooowly now. Health improving.
It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer. ~Albert Einstein Posted Image

#4 bartfull

 
bartfull

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,465 posts
 

Posted 01 May 2013 - 10:35 AM

Oh yeah, I meant to tell you that the Udi's bread and muffins have no soy in them. I too have an intolerance to both gluten and soy, plus CORN. And I live in a tiny town with one health food store. I have to drive at least 60 miles to find another store that carries gluten-free foods. I usually just go once a month and stock up.


  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#5 bcanela

 
bcanela

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
 

Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:05 AM

I guess soy is more of the issue for me...I'm new to label reading for so and people have scared me half to death to eat anything store bought...I'm looking for normal items such as cereals, yogurts, any sort of easy meals that are not at a natural foods store. The natural foods stores here are like vitamin shops and only carry a few items. Everywhere I go anything gluten-free is ridiculously expensive. A loaf of gluten free bread in this town is at least $7 and I literally bought a bag of gluten-free pretzels that cost over $9. I can't afford to buy specialty items and have enough money to pay my rent...
  • 0

#6 pricklypear1971

 
pricklypear1971

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,684 posts
 

Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:52 AM

I guess soy is more of the issue for me...I'm new to label reading for so and people have scared me half to death to eat anything store bought...I'm looking for normal items such as cereals, yogurts, any sort of easy meals that are not at a natural foods store. The natural foods stores here are like vitamin shops and only carry a few items. Everywhere I go anything gluten-free is ridiculously expensive. A loaf of gluten free bread in this town is at least $7 and I literally bought a bag of gluten-free pretzels that cost over $9. I can't afford to buy specialty items and have enough money to pay my rent...

Then learn how to make your own bread products at home. Make your own gluten-free/SF mix and bake bread.

I'm not sure I understood your statement about being picky about your meats and veggies. Do you not like them, already eat enough of them....?

If you want processed gluten-free/SF food it will be hard to find and expensive. I suggest you learn to cook the foods you want to eat (pretzels, crackers) and make your own substitutes. Try Living Without magazine/website for suggestions.

Cereal - versions of chex are gluten-free but I don't know about SF. You can make granola at home and freeze. I have luck using dairy products, jerky, and nuts as snacks. And popcorn...

No one has time to do this every day. Cook in bulk, refrigerate/freeze.
  • 0
Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#7 shadowicewolf

 
shadowicewolf

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,758 posts
 

Posted 06 May 2013 - 11:00 AM

Chex, as i have heard, get some of the added vitamins from soy.


  • 0

#8 GFinDC

 
GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,134 posts
 

Posted 06 May 2013 - 11:51 AM

Just buy meats and veggies, and cook them!  :)

 

We have several threads on meal ideas.  If you want I can post them.

 

Here are a few to get you started.

 

Thread For gluten-free, Dairy, Soy, Corn And Nightshade Free Recipes
http://www.celiac.co...e-free-recipes/

Super Easy Meal Ideas Anyone?
http://www.celiac.co...l-ideas-anyone/

 


  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#9 DutchGirl

 
DutchGirl

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts
 

Posted 11 May 2013 - 03:31 AM

I would invest in a crock pot if you don't already have one. You can look up recipes and cook a big portion. It's so easy to throw it all in there and cook it for the day, you can have left overs for the rest of the week. A lot of times I do a lot of my food prep on Sundays so that I just have to go to the fridge and grab stuff throughout the week.


  • 0

#10 julissa

 
julissa

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 149 posts
 

Posted 11 May 2013 - 05:07 AM

I am gluten free, soy free and dairy free and have no issues eating at all. I just got a crock pot and I use it at least twice a week. I freeze up individual portions for quick meals. I get home late a lot and don't have much time either. the food cooks all day unattended, you don't need time for it.

 

I don't use the store bought products much, I use fresh whole foods that I get in my supermarket and know what I am eating. google gluten free crock pot recipes and the list is endless. then I just adjust it myself to take out dairy or soy.

 

it takes a small amount of effort, but worth it a million fold in the end.


  • 0

#11 Adalaide

 
Adalaide

    It needs to be about 20% cooler.

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,441 posts
 

Posted 11 May 2013 - 09:46 AM

I am gluten free, low tyramine and low histamine, which translates to soy free, msg free, preservative free, artificial color free, I can't just eat eggs willy nilly, plus there are literally dozens of fruits, vegetables and meats I can't have. (I'm sure I'm forgetting stuff! :lol: )

 

I am also on a very very fixed and low grocery budget. I eat mostly fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables and meats and a select few boxed items such as Nature's Path cereals which are surprising well priced. I do "splurge" on things like flours and such and do all of my own baking with the exception of bread which I buy at Costco for $8 for two loaves. Crock pot cooking is quick and simple, and takes practically no time at all. You can whip up a meatloaf in minutes and just wait for it to cook.

 

What it will come down to, and I am sorry but this is the cold, hard truth, is that you will either pay out the nose for what you want, find time to make it, or go without. Those are your three options, there isn't some other magical secret that we all know. What I can say for sure though is that you will realize quickly if you try to find the time that cooking doesn't take nearly the amount of time you think it does and is well worth it.


  • 0

"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#12 GFinDC

 
GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,134 posts
 

Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:23 AM

Hi Bcanela,

 

You can try using Mission brand corn tortillas instead of bread.  It is much cheaper and works fine.  You can make small wraps with it.  There are other kinds of gluten-free wraps available too. Rudi's and Trader Joe's both sell them.  You need to keep them in the cooler as they don't have preservatives.  If they are too stiff and crack, just rinse them quickly with water and heat them in a pan or a microwave.  You may be able to find them locally or order them online.  There is also a rice cake like product called Corn Thins.  They are something like crackers, although not salty.  Pretty brittle too but that's ok in a cracker.

 

It may take a while to adjust to eating gluten-free and eating mostly whole foods, and doing your own cooking.  But after a while it gets to be routine and not a big deal.  If gluten-free flours are too expensive you can grind your own.  Buy some dried peas or rice or whatever you want to use and grind it up.  You can also make gluten-free buns in a microwave, here's a thread on who to do it.  I haven't tried this but you might even be able to make potato flour by grinding up potato flakes.  If you think more along the lines of how people ate a 100 years or so ago, that is a good way to go.  Back then people ate whole foods mostly and did their cooking at home.  Unless they were living in a city, or had lots of moola.  But most of the processed food products we buy nowadays in grocery stores didn't exist then.  People got along fine with that situation (eating real food)  then and we can now too.  Just because it comes in a box and has millions of dollars of advertising behind it doesn't mean it is good for you.

 

Easy yummy bread in minutes
http://www.celiac.co...ead-in-minutes/


  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: