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Multiple Intolerances And Restaurants?
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My food issues began several years ago.  I am a self-diagnosed celiac.  I have been tested for allergies and have none. I first discovered gluten was a problem a few years ago then discovered soy, casien, corn, chicken, coffee and even peanuts made me sick as well.  The best part is that I feel the best I've ever felt. I know I am finding my health again and I feel normal most of the time.  I've learned how to find/cook really well and am happy most of the time. 

 

Here is where I need some help:  I really miss eating in restaurants but I am terrified of doing so.  Corn is in EVERYTHING.  I can tolerate very small amounts (talking vitamins) but I have trouble with things like iodized salt.  I am very scared to eat out but I really miss it.  I am 28 and live in Chicago.  Best city for food ever!  I am very happy but it feels fairly isolating not to be able to go out. 

 

How do those of you with similar intolerances do it?  Do I just need to wait a couple years for my gut to heal?  Do you bring your own food? 

 

I'm feeling hopeful enough to try new things.  Help me figure it out? 

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As a self diagnosed gluten intolerant, you may have settled your system, if you have been gluten free for a couple of years.  Perhaps you can slowly reintroduce one product at a time.  You might start with small amounts of corn and gradually increase the amount over a period of time, and see how you feel.

 

You mentioned that you have a problem with iodized salt.  Did/Do  you have skin issues?

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Corn is in EVERYTHING.  I can tolerate very small amounts (talking vitamins) but I have trouble with things like iodized salt.

Maybe I am missing something, but what makes you think that salt, iodized or not, contains corn?
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As a self diagnosed gluten intolerant, you may have settled your system, if you have been gluten free for a couple of years.  Perhaps you can slowly reintroduce one product at a time.  You might start with small amounts of corn and gradually increase the amount over a period of time, and see how you feel.

 

You mentioned that you have a problem with iodized salt.  Did/Do  you have skin issues?

I have some pretty itchy skin but most of my issues are gastro.  I react to iodized salt due to corn as the binding agent. I have only been STRICTLY gluten free for about a year or so.  I thought I was gluten free, oh the lessons we learn.  So, I know I'm still healing. 

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Maybe I am missing something, but what makes you think that salt, iodized or not, contains corn?

Iodized salt contains corn.  Its a binding agent. Salt in the US has iodine added to it.  That means corn too.    I can hav things with sea salt because they are not iodized.  Corn is in LOTS of things.  It just depends on how reactive you are.  I personally can't even tolerate distilled vinegar or liquors made from corn. Citric acid (usually made from corn) is another common problem. 

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Again,  I know how to avoid the foods at home.  Anyone with similar issues that has figured out how to eat in a restaurant?  Honestly, corn has been harder to avoid than gluten.  The combo....makes restaurant eating pretty difficult.  I'd really appreciate anyone's ideas on how to handle it. 

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I know there are forums for corn sensitive people, maybe they have a better idea of how to avoid corn in a restaurant?

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I have some pretty itchy skin but most of my issues are gastro.  I react to iodized salt due to corn as the binding agent. I have only been STRICTLY gluten free for about a year or so.  I thought I was gluten free, oh the lessons we learn.  So, I know I'm still healing. 

No, corn is not in iodized salt.  What you may be reacting to is the iodine in the salt.  Those people with the skin issue call  DH ( - ugg I have to spell it........dermetitus hepetiphomis) have itchy skin, only remedied by the removal of gluten.

 

(I am a lousy speller, and have lost my spellcheck - I'm useless :blink: )

 

To avoid everything you need, the only suggestion I have is to order a dry salad and bring your own dressing.

 

Best of luck to you.

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I am intolerant to gluten, corn and dairy. I don't know if it helps but I regularly eat out at indian, thai or vietnamese restaurants. Indian is a good pick because the dishes "normally" don't contain any wheat or corn and they often have vegan options (sometimes I ask to have meat added to a vegan spinach stew for example). I have reacted only once while eating out  in the last year or so (my guess is coconut milk contained xantham gum). I try to pick nicer restaurants and always ask questions. I also eat sushi with no problem (no eel, no fish eggs) or just order some grilled meat/ fish with steamed veggies, or any safe side. You might also try African (West African) food if there's any where you live.

Good luck! 

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I am intolerant to gluten, dairy, soy, corn, tomatoes, peppers, and now I think mushrooms. Sigh.

Eating out IS the hardest part. I can eat sushi if served just rice, fish, and lemon slices. I have to stay away from the reconstituted wasabi (maybe corn?) but the ginger is OK. There is a steamed fish dish at a local Thai restaurant I can eat. At Maria's Italian Kitchen (chain) they have a low carb, gluten free meno that works for me, generally chicken and veggies cooked in olive oil with garlic. But not sure if they are in Chicago or not.

There is a restaurant in Lake View that is ENTIRELY gluten free. It is called Senza and I ate there with some friends (gluten lovers) and we ll thoroughly enjoyed our meals. When I called to make a res I notified them if my intolerances. Our server kindly let me know what items I could order and avoid The List. It was great.

Any restaurant that uses brand sauces is out, like Cheesecake Factory. You want to find more chef cooked food.

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Corn is not an issue for me but I do have mulitple food allergies.  I am getting to the point where I hate dining out because my choices are so limited.  I can eat some Mexican food but that probably wouldn't work well for you with the corn thing.  But what I order at other places are a plain hamburger patty, plain baked potato, maybe French fries or hash browns, plain salad, fresh fruit.  I can also do canned fruit or applesauce but I can't say for sure that there wouldn't be HFCS in there.

 

Your best bet is to find a local place that cooks from scratch.  Those places are getting harder to find, I know.  Scan the menu and look for things that might be options or to give you an idea of ingredients they would have in the kitchen.  Then give them a list of what you can't have and see what they can do for you.  I often have to order modified things from the menu or things that aren't on the menu.  One place would give me hummus, olives and raw veggies.  Hummus might not work for you because it can (but IMO shouldn't) have soybean oil in it.

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No, corn is not in iodized salt.  What you may be reacting to is the iodine in the salt.  Those people with the skin issue call  DH ( - ugg I have to spell it........dermetitus hepetiphomis) have itchy skin, only remedied by the removal of gluten.

 

(I am a lousy speller, and have lost my spellcheck - I'm useless :blink: )

 

To avoid everything you need, the only suggestion I have is to order a dry salad and bring your own dressing.

 

Best of luck to you.

Thanks so much. I have to say, with my luck, perhaps I am reacting to both.  I appreciate the recommendation on the salad  :)

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Corn is not an issue for me but I do have mulitple food allergies.  I am getting to the point where I hate dining out because my choices are so limited.  I can eat some Mexican food but that probably wouldn't work well for you with the corn thing.  But what I order at other places are a plain hamburger patty, plain baked potato, maybe French fries or hash browns, plain salad, fresh fruit.  I can also do canned fruit or applesauce but I can't say for sure that there wouldn't be HFCS in there.

 

Your best bet is to find a local place that cooks from scratch.  Those places are getting harder to find, I know.  Scan the menu and look for things that might be options or to give you an idea of ingredients they would have in the kitchen.  Then give them a list of what you can't have and see what they can do for you.  I often have to order modified things from the menu or things that aren't on the menu.  One place would give me hummus, olives and raw veggies.  Hummus might not work for you because it can (but IMO shouldn't) have soybean oil in it.

Thanks!  That actually sounds really helpful.  I suppose its the idea of trying to explain all of this to a server or chef.  A list is a great idea!

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I am intolerant to gluten, corn and dairy. I don't know if it helps but I regularly eat out at indian, thai or vietnamese restaurants. Indian is a good pick because the dishes "normally" don't contain any wheat or corn and they often have vegan options (sometimes I ask to have meat added to a vegan spinach stew for example). I have reacted only once while eating out  in the last year or so (my guess is coconut milk contained xantham gum). I try to pick nicer restaurants and always ask questions. I also eat sushi with no problem (no eel, no fish eggs) or just order some grilled meat/ fish with steamed veggies, or any safe side. You might also try African (West African) food if there's any where you live.

Good luck! 

Thank you!  I had been thinking about more ethnic foods (Chicago is a jackpot there). I was actually getting gutsy enough to think about Indian food this weekend but thought I'd hop on here first. You confirmed my confidence!  Sushi too huh?  Alright, I'm going in!

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OK, you guys are awesome!  Sounds like ethnic restaurants and local chef's are the way to go.  I'm nervous but I'm going to try it out!  I'll check in and let you know how it goes.  Thanks so much for the ideas everyone!  Keep em coming!

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You're in Chicago! which is about the best place to be. I was there for the first time a few weeks ago and ate out all weekends with no problems at all! Then again, I can eat corn...

However, it seems a lot of restaurants there are more knowledgeable and accomodating to food intolerances. I might even have seen "corn free' options at The Chicago Diner, but don't quote me on that. If you're wondering if a restaurant can cater to you, give them a call, talk to the cooks, find out your options and if they can do something special for you.

Eating out for you will be a very occasional thing, which means you should take the time to get something really good.

 

Oh, there's an italian retaurant called RPM that supposedly does their own housemade gluten-free pasta. Might be worth checking out (I know I will next time!)

 

Good luck!

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Actually, iodized salt DOES contain corn. Every website dealing with corn allergies says so. Corn is the carrier for the iodine. If they just put iodine in it without a carrier, only parts of the salt would get it. I believe they use corn starch because it also works as an anti-clumping agent.

 

Here is just one website that shows iodized salt as an allergen: http://www.cornallergens.com/list/corn-allergen-list.php

 

As for restaurants, I don't go to them unless I absolutely have to. When I do, I order steak cooked on the charbroiler and ask them to use a clean fork or spatula. I don't get any sides because the chance of CC is too great. I usually bring my own side orders and pay full price for the steak.

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Actually, iodized salt DOES contain corn. Every website dealing with corn allergies says so. Corn is the carrier for the iodine. If they just put iodine in it without a carrier, only parts of the salt would get it. I believe they use corn starch because it also works as an anti-clumping agent.

 

Here is just one website that shows iodized salt as an allergen: http://www.cornallergens.com/list/corn-allergen-list.php

 

As for restaurants, I don't go to them unless I absolutely have to. When I do, I order steak cooked on the charbroiler and ask them to use a clean fork or spatula. I don't get any sides because the chance of CC is too great. I usually bring my own side orders and pay full price for the steak.

 

So, if the dextrose is corn derived, would it not be processed to the point of being non detectable, much like wheat based dextrose?

 

http://www.mortonsalt.com/faqs/food-salt-faqs#q5

 

Why is iodine added to salt? Why is dextrose added to salt?
In 1924 Morton became the first company to produce iodized salt for the table in order to reduce the incidence of simple goiter. Dextrose is added to stabilize the iodide. Iodine is vital to the proper functioning of the thyroid gland and the prevention of goiter. Actually, the amount of dextrose in salt is so small that it is dietetically insignificant. Morton® Iodized Table Salt contains 0.04 percent dextrose or 40 milligrams per 100 grams of salt. Morton® Plain Table Salt contains neither iodine nor dextrose. All Morton Salt products containing potassium iodide are labeled as such.

 

 

With that being said, I do not have a corn intolerance and I am sure others are far more knowledgeable. ;)

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So, if the dextrose is corn derived, would it not be processed to the point of being non detectable, much like wheat based dextrose?

 

http://www.mortonsalt.com/faqs/food-salt-faqs#q5

Would be great if that were the case.  Its EXTREMELY common for corn sensitive people to react to iodized salt.  Before I learned corn was the problem I thought I was reacting to tomatoes, beans, soups...everything.  Then I thought, oh CORN!  Turns out as long as I avoid the iodized salt in these items I am fine.  Iodized salt bothers most people with corn intolerances and allergies.  Its very common.  Unfortunate that it causes reactions, but it does.  Again, even things that remove recognizable protiens like corn based liquor or vinegar will cause a reaction in me and many other people.  Sorry, iodized salt is a problem. 

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It would depend on one's sensitivity, I would think. Most of the corn websites deal with true allergies but there are quite a few members with intolerances like ours. As for me, I am MUCH more sensitive to corn than I am to gluten. I won't touch iodized salt. I have some Morton salt here at the shop which is non-iodized, and I have some sea salt at home that may have a bit of trace iodine but nothing added. I must admit though, I hardly ever even use salt anymore. I used to like it on bananas but I have given up on buying bananas here. They rot before they turn yellow. :angry:

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Well, I learned something about iodized salt. B)

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Mary88, how do you do with those clear plastic bottles that individual servings of water comes in? I ask because one night I was going to a restaurant for music and I was afraid to even get a beverage. Of course soda is sweetened with corn syrup, and even the iced tea was off limits due to the corn starch they use in tea bags. So I bought myself a bottle of water at the convenience store on the way. I got hit and hit HARD. The next day I looked up the water brand to see if it had something in it and sure enough, the BOTTLE is made from corn! You'd think by the time they got done turning the corn to plastic it wouldn't be a problem, but I KNOW that was the only thing I had eaten or drank that was different from my usual fare. And then I read on some of the corn forums that others have had reactions to this corn plastic too. I have often said that if it were only gluten, life would be easy, but between the gluten, the corn and the soy (not to mention nightshades and salicylates), there is hardly anything safe to eat!

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Mary88, how do you do with those clear plastic bottles that individual servings of water comes in? I ask because one night I was going to a restaurant for music and I was afraid to even get a beverage. Of course soda is sweetened with corn syrup, and even the iced tea was off limits due to the corn starch they use in tea bags. So I bought myself a bottle of water at the convenience store on the way. I got hit and hit HARD. The next day I looked up the water brand to see if it had something in it and sure enough, the BOTTLE is made from corn! You'd think by the time they got done turning the corn to plastic it wouldn't be a problem, but I KNOW that was the only thing I had eaten or drank that was different from my usual fare. And then I read on some of the corn forums that others have had reactions to this corn plastic too. I have often said that if it were only gluten, life would be easy, but between the gluten, the corn and the soy (not to mention nightshades and salicylates), there is hardly anything safe to eat!

Oddly enough I haven't noticed a reaction to water bottles?  I don't do soda or most tea either.  I can handle trace amounts but not quite THAT sensitive.  What about the wax on fruit?  I find I do ok with whole foods fruit.  How about you?  Weird things they add it to right!?  Do you do medication?  I have a few I take that I know have corn as a binding agent and I seem to do ok.  Can't really afford to compound.  I'm with you though, I react more violently to corn than to gluten.  Stupid intestines ;) 

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I can't eat most fruit because of my salicylate sensitivity. All I can safely eat are bananas and pears, but the produce here is atrocious. I just don't waste my money on it anymore. The only medication I take is tylenol and I have to have it compounded. For a while there I had gotten to the point where I could tolerate corn starch so I was able to take regular tylenol and even eat Udi's bread.

 

But I got glutened a few months ago and it knocked me back to square one. I'm hoping that in a few months I will be able to eat Udi's again, and if I'm successful with that, I might give nightshades another try.

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Hey!

   I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease 7 years ago. (It took them 6 years to diagnose me - absolute torture) Anyway, Since then, I've become vegan, and recently found out I have more food allergies and sensitivities (it's a long long list). I don't EVER eat out at restaurants... I haven't for the past 7 years. I DO still go out with family/friends to restaurants occasionally, and when I do, I bring my own food. ALWAYS. I don't trust the restaurants...I've worked in them before. I can't handle cross-contamination - therefore, the risk isn't worth it for me. 
Right now I basically stick to a list of 10 different foods that I eat on a daily basis...
Good luck! Hope it all works out for you! :o)

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