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Multiple Intolerances And Restaurants?

restaurants corn gluten dairy soy potato chicken peanuts

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25 replies to this topic

#16 Pegleg84

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 10:08 AM

You're in Chicago! which is about the best place to be. I was there for the first time a few weeks ago and ate out all weekends with no problems at all! Then again, I can eat corn...

However, it seems a lot of restaurants there are more knowledgeable and accomodating to food intolerances. I might even have seen "corn free' options at The Chicago Diner, but don't quote me on that. If you're wondering if a restaurant can cater to you, give them a call, talk to the cooks, find out your options and if they can do something special for you.

Eating out for you will be a very occasional thing, which means you should take the time to get something really good.

 

Oh, there's an italian retaurant called RPM that supposedly does their own housemade gluten-free pasta. Might be worth checking out (I know I will next time!)

 

Good luck!


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~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.


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#17 bartfull

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 12:27 PM

Actually, iodized salt DOES contain corn. Every website dealing with corn allergies says so. Corn is the carrier for the iodine. If they just put iodine in it without a carrier, only parts of the salt would get it. I believe they use corn starch because it also works as an anti-clumping agent.

 

Here is just one website that shows iodized salt as an allergen: http://www.cornaller...lergen-list.php

 

As for restaurants, I don't go to them unless I absolutely have to. When I do, I order steak cooked on the charbroiler and ask them to use a clean fork or spatula. I don't get any sides because the chance of CC is too great. I usually bring my own side orders and pay full price for the steak.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#18 Lisa

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 01:44 PM

Actually, iodized salt DOES contain corn. Every website dealing with corn allergies says so. Corn is the carrier for the iodine. If they just put iodine in it without a carrier, only parts of the salt would get it. I believe they use corn starch because it also works as an anti-clumping agent.

 

Here is just one website that shows iodized salt as an allergen: http://www.cornaller...lergen-list.php

 

As for restaurants, I don't go to them unless I absolutely have to. When I do, I order steak cooked on the charbroiler and ask them to use a clean fork or spatula. I don't get any sides because the chance of CC is too great. I usually bring my own side orders and pay full price for the steak.

 

So, if the dextrose is corn derived, would it not be processed to the point of being non detectable, much like wheat based dextrose?

 

http://www.mortonsal...od-salt-faqs#q5

 

Why is iodine added to salt? Why is dextrose added to salt?
In 1924 Morton became the first company to produce iodized salt for the table in order to reduce the incidence of simple goiter. Dextrose is added to stabilize the iodide. Iodine is vital to the proper functioning of the thyroid gland and the prevention of goiter. Actually, the amount of dextrose in salt is so small that it is dietetically insignificant. Morton® Iodized Table Salt contains 0.04 percent dextrose or 40 milligrams per 100 grams of salt. Morton® Plain Table Salt contains neither iodine nor dextrose. All Morton Salt products containing potassium iodide are labeled as such.

 

 

With that being said, I do not have a corn intolerance and I am sure others are far more knowledgeable. ;)


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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#19 Maryw88

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 01:53 PM

So, if the dextrose is corn derived, would it not be processed to the point of being non detectable, much like wheat based dextrose?

 

http://www.mortonsal...od-salt-faqs#q5

Would be great if that were the case.  Its EXTREMELY common for corn sensitive people to react to iodized salt.  Before I learned corn was the problem I thought I was reacting to tomatoes, beans, soups...everything.  Then I thought, oh CORN!  Turns out as long as I avoid the iodized salt in these items I am fine.  Iodized salt bothers most people with corn intolerances and allergies.  Its very common.  Unfortunate that it causes reactions, but it does.  Again, even things that remove recognizable protiens like corn based liquor or vinegar will cause a reaction in me and many other people.  Sorry, iodized salt is a problem. 


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#20 bartfull

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 01:54 PM

It would depend on one's sensitivity, I would think. Most of the corn websites deal with true allergies but there are quite a few members with intolerances like ours. As for me, I am MUCH more sensitive to corn than I am to gluten. I won't touch iodized salt. I have some Morton salt here at the shop which is non-iodized, and I have some sea salt at home that may have a bit of trace iodine but nothing added. I must admit though, I hardly ever even use salt anymore. I used to like it on bananas but I have given up on buying bananas here. They rot before they turn yellow. :angry:


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#21 Lisa

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:02 PM

Well, I learned something about iodized salt. B)


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Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#22 bartfull

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:21 PM

Mary88, how do you do with those clear plastic bottles that individual servings of water comes in? I ask because one night I was going to a restaurant for music and I was afraid to even get a beverage. Of course soda is sweetened with corn syrup, and even the iced tea was off limits due to the corn starch they use in tea bags. So I bought myself a bottle of water at the convenience store on the way. I got hit and hit HARD. The next day I looked up the water brand to see if it had something in it and sure enough, the BOTTLE is made from corn! You'd think by the time they got done turning the corn to plastic it wouldn't be a problem, but I KNOW that was the only thing I had eaten or drank that was different from my usual fare. And then I read on some of the corn forums that others have had reactions to this corn plastic too. I have often said that if it were only gluten, life would be easy, but between the gluten, the corn and the soy (not to mention nightshades and salicylates), there is hardly anything safe to eat!


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#23 Maryw88

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 03:08 PM

Mary88, how do you do with those clear plastic bottles that individual servings of water comes in? I ask because one night I was going to a restaurant for music and I was afraid to even get a beverage. Of course soda is sweetened with corn syrup, and even the iced tea was off limits due to the corn starch they use in tea bags. So I bought myself a bottle of water at the convenience store on the way. I got hit and hit HARD. The next day I looked up the water brand to see if it had something in it and sure enough, the BOTTLE is made from corn! You'd think by the time they got done turning the corn to plastic it wouldn't be a problem, but I KNOW that was the only thing I had eaten or drank that was different from my usual fare. And then I read on some of the corn forums that others have had reactions to this corn plastic too. I have often said that if it were only gluten, life would be easy, but between the gluten, the corn and the soy (not to mention nightshades and salicylates), there is hardly anything safe to eat!

Oddly enough I haven't noticed a reaction to water bottles?  I don't do soda or most tea either.  I can handle trace amounts but not quite THAT sensitive.  What about the wax on fruit?  I find I do ok with whole foods fruit.  How about you?  Weird things they add it to right!?  Do you do medication?  I have a few I take that I know have corn as a binding agent and I seem to do ok.  Can't really afford to compound.  I'm with you though, I react more violently to corn than to gluten.  Stupid intestines ;) 


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#24 bartfull

 
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Posted 03 May 2013 - 03:16 PM

I can't eat most fruit because of my salicylate sensitivity. All I can safely eat are bananas and pears, but the produce here is atrocious. I just don't waste my money on it anymore. The only medication I take is tylenol and I have to have it compounded. For a while there I had gotten to the point where I could tolerate corn starch so I was able to take regular tylenol and even eat Udi's bread.

 

But I got glutened a few months ago and it knocked me back to square one. I'm hoping that in a few months I will be able to eat Udi's again, and if I'm successful with that, I might give nightshades another try.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#25 SonjaRebecca

 
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Posted 11 May 2013 - 01:41 PM

Hey!

   I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease 7 years ago. (It took them 6 years to diagnose me - absolute torture) Anyway, Since then, I've become vegan, and recently found out I have more food allergies and sensitivities (it's a long long list). I don't EVER eat out at restaurants... I haven't for the past 7 years. I DO still go out with family/friends to restaurants occasionally, and when I do, I bring my own food. ALWAYS. I don't trust the restaurants...I've worked in them before. I can't handle cross-contamination - therefore, the risk isn't worth it for me. 
Right now I basically stick to a list of 10 different foods that I eat on a daily basis...
Good luck! Hope it all works out for you! :o)


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#26 mamaupupup

 
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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:01 PM

Hi there!  We also find that going in to a restaurant and talking to the Chef at 3:30 in the afternoon and then returning to eat on the early side ensures an AWESOME experience :).  We also tip REALLY well and return to the places I feel safe eating :)


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