Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Nightshade Intolerance


  • Please log in to reply

42 replies to this topic

#16 kabowman

 
kabowman

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 872 posts
 

Posted 20 October 2005 - 10:51 AM

My sister has a nightshade intolerance - I think I have a problem with potatoes but refuse to acknowledge right now because my diet is already so limited I hate to cut those out too - yet.
  • 0
-Kate
gluten-free since July 2004

Other Intolerances:
Strawberries and Banannas (2007)
Nitrates (April 2006)
Yeast (which includes all vinegar so no condiments) (Oct. 2004)
Peanuts (Nov. 2004)
Soy (Oct. 2004)
Almonds (Sept. 2004)
Corn (Sept. 2004)
Lactose/Casein (1999)

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 Mr J

 
Mr J

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 74 posts
 

Posted 21 October 2005 - 06:39 PM

yes thats exactly one of the phenol lists I have seen Stephanie.

a tip from a friend (mother of ADD children) - phenols are most prominent in the skin/peel of the foods, so maybe try giving those potatoes a good peel?

a tip from me - much of my veggies/fruit are sent thru my juice machine for ease of ingestion. I've only got a cheap machine but i can shove in unpeeled tomatoes and kiwi and it will strip the peel off in seconds.

i know most of the nutrients are meant to be in the peel region but in my world any calories are useful calories
  • 0
age 47
enterolab tests
HLA-DQB1*0602, 0604 - sensetivity genes
Antigliadin IgA and Transglutaminase igA positive
Casein IgA positive
primary problem - gastroparesis - paralysis of the stomach
under control with the right drugs

#18 Felidae

 
Felidae

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,098 posts
 

Posted 21 October 2005 - 07:00 PM

Thanks for the info. Mr J. I'm still not convinced that I can't eat potatoes, so today I had half a tube of Lays Staxx! I seem to be fine with the other nightshades. I'll have to look into that list of phenols and see if any of those are affecting me.
  • 0
Tapioca intolerant
First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease
Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.
Gluten-free since June 2005
Dx with IBS February 2005
Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

#19 Mr J

 
Mr J

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 74 posts
 

Posted 22 October 2005 - 05:39 AM

1/2 a tube, i'm jealous of your enterocapacity, i'll sometimes put 4 chips in a gluten-free peanut butter and banana sandwich

don't mean to deliberately send ppl chasing red herrings, but follow possible leads is all we can do isn't it?

hmm lets see where 1/2 a tube fits into the phenol picture. Lets hope that lays staxx are cookie cutted out of real potatoes and not stamped out from reconsitituted potato starch. Also lets hope that they come out of normal pebble shaped potatoes and not some GM tube shaped mutant.

for efficiency reasons I would imagine that the girth of the potato would have to exceed the circumference of the staxx tube by a fair bit - if it was exactly the same would only get one crisp/chip out of it. This would mean that much of the outer layer of the potato would be cut away from the chip. So by this reasoning a tube of staxx should be low in phenol.
  • 0
age 47
enterolab tests
HLA-DQB1*0602, 0604 - sensetivity genes
Antigliadin IgA and Transglutaminase igA positive
Casein IgA positive
primary problem - gastroparesis - paralysis of the stomach
under control with the right drugs

#20 Felidae

 
Felidae

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,098 posts
 

Posted 22 October 2005 - 01:44 PM

Actually Lays Staxx are from dehydrated potatoes and potato starch and a bunch of other ingredients. I didn't get sick from them. So my next test, after midterms, will be to try a potato without the skin.
  • 0
Tapioca intolerant
First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease
Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.
Gluten-free since June 2005
Dx with IBS February 2005
Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

#21 LUAP

 
LUAP

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts
 

Posted 23 October 2005 - 07:51 AM

stephanie,

charcoal, as well as slipery helm and psyllium hulls are remedy for the leaky gut. someone who has a gut that leaks can have psoriasis, eczema, multiple food allergies, arthritis...

may be your nightshade intolerance is just hiding a leaky gut problem.
  • 0
Canada
Where the health cares are free, but where the doctors worry more about their bank account than the health of their patients.
gluten-free since april 2003
On the no grain diet (Mercola) and initial phase diet (kaufmann) since january 2005. healthy since january 2005

#22 Felidae

 
Felidae

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,098 posts
 

Posted 23 October 2005 - 02:14 PM

How does psyllium help with leaky gut? I've got a whole bag of it that I stopped using since I went gluten-free.
  • 0
Tapioca intolerant
First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease
Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.
Gluten-free since June 2005
Dx with IBS February 2005
Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

#23 LUAP

 
LUAP

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts
 

Posted 23 October 2005 - 05:42 PM

psyllium hulls, just like the two other one, bind mycotoxins and exit your body when you go to washroom.
- By eating mucilaginous fiber, you are lowering the level of available mycotoxin in your gi tract, thus, reducing damage to your GI tract. a leaky gut is a damaged GI tract.

for example, just think about what mycotoxins does to skin: eczema, psoriasis... It's the same process involved inside.

- By eating mucilaginous fiber, you also prevent constipation, wich in turn can be bad for your general health. mucilaginous fiber are verry usefull if you put yourself on protein (low carb) diet.

is n't great: something that prevent diarea as well as constipation, and contribute to your general healing by lowering you mycotoxin level in your gi tract. of course, you have to pay attention of the origin of your mucilaginous fiber since wheat contain mucilaginous fiber.
  • 0
Canada
Where the health cares are free, but where the doctors worry more about their bank account than the health of their patients.
gluten-free since april 2003
On the no grain diet (Mercola) and initial phase diet (kaufmann) since january 2005. healthy since january 2005

#24 Felidae

 
Felidae

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,098 posts
 

Posted 23 October 2005 - 05:47 PM

Thanks for that info. Maybe I'll add the 100% psyllium husks back into my diet and see if that helps with my symptoms.
  • 0
Tapioca intolerant
First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease
Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.
Gluten-free since June 2005
Dx with IBS February 2005
Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

#25 skbird

 
skbird

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 973 posts
 

Posted 23 October 2005 - 05:56 PM

Hi Luap -

I'd buy the leaky gut thing for me if I hadn't already gotten sick from contact and even smell of nightshades (both peppers in these cases, and the smell was from them cooking on the BBQ and the smoke blowing my way). Can't see how leaky gut would have allowed for that. I wish that was what it was! I can solve that.

As for Mr. J and the skin - 90% of the solanine in potatoes (the nasty alkaloid that makes people sick) is in the skin, so going further than skin deep in the case of potatoes is a good idea. I cringe when I see people eating fried potato skins - they used to make be barf when I was younger. Never a fan of the skins.

This is an interesting thread. I wish I could find a solution for myself - every so often I'll sneak one french fry, skin free, and it tastes so wonderful. I don't really miss tomatoes. I have been finding lately that broth with carrots in it makes it taste tomato-y.

Don't really miss peppers at all. Now they even seem to bother my dad. After he made fun of me for ages. That's what you get...

Stephanie
  • 0
Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

#26 skbird

 
skbird

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 973 posts
 

Posted 23 October 2005 - 06:13 PM

duplicate post...
  • 0
Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

#27 LUAP

 
LUAP

    Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts
 

Posted 24 October 2005 - 02:45 PM

ohoh poop,

stephanie, look what i have found:

http://yarchive.net/..._alkaloids.html

http://www.mold-help...ntent/view/417/

...
  • 0
Canada
Where the health cares are free, but where the doctors worry more about their bank account than the health of their patients.
gluten-free since april 2003
On the no grain diet (Mercola) and initial phase diet (kaufmann) since january 2005. healthy since january 2005

#28 skbird

 
skbird

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 973 posts
 

Posted 24 October 2005 - 03:11 PM

Wow, LUAP, the potato link is very interesting. When I got sick from touching peppers (was helping a friend who was making salsa - I washed the cutting board under hot soapy water, then wiped my face with my clean hand. My face started to burn from residual pepper juice which I didn't worry about. The next day I was sick with the major headache and stomach symptoms) I called a friend I had worked with at a biology software company, we made software for high school students to learn about biological processes. He said that there was something in peppers, etc, that was a neurotoxin and could conceivably spread through my blood stream and cause the reaction. I was really surprised by this and that was when I called an allergist, who said call a gastroenterologist. The gastro said call the allergist. So I called poison control instead and got a story somewhat like what you posed on that first link.

I think it has something to do with the liver not being able to break down the toxic qualities of the alkaloids in the nightshade family fast enough to not allow the body to have a reaction. If too much of this alkaloid will make anyone sick (as mentioned in that link) then if a standard amount makes some people as sick, there must be something to the metabolism of it. Since it does not appear to be an allergy - IE no typical allergic reaction symptoms, then it makes me believe it is a weakness in the liver.

The poison control center person I talked with said it is a toxic reaction - then he said he had a hard time believing that anyone could get sick from a potato. He said the skin of a green potato or the eyes is the worst, also leaves from the plant and green tomatoes. That surprised me because many people eat fried green potatoes.

I know that I have read the alkaloid starts to break down at temperatures over 450 degrees F, and have unscientifically justified my occasional french fry ingestion with that knowledge. Also, heat alone doesn't do it, must have hot oil involved, hence my french fry theory. I use to be able to eat as many as 10 fries, then I cut it to 5. I then found if I ate 5 fries two days in a row I would get sick - the half life for the alkaloid, or processing the nightshade food, is 36 hours. That would mean eating two days in a row is nearly like having that much in one setting. Before reading that I had found that if I skipped two days in between eating 5 fries, I was ok.

Yep, I am my best guinea pig. One of the times I got the sickest was when I went to a Chinese restaurant and had some soup. In the broth, surprisngly, were chunks of fresh tomato (didn't look like they'd cooked in very long). Instead of returning the soup, I thought if I pulled the chunks out, I would be ok. Within 2 hours of eating that soup I started getting sick, had to go home from work and was home two days. This was before I really realized to what extent this group of foods made me sick. That was when I started getting really careful.

Anyway, it would be great if I could find something that helped prevent this from happening, but honestly at this point, I almost never encounter these foods, or at least never really crave them. Probably lack some enzyme - something that doesn't show up on liver tests (mine always looks great on those metabolic panels).

Stephanie
  • 0
Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04
Gluten-free since 10/04
Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)
Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07
Fibromyalgia, 6/11

#29 cali

 
cali

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
 

Posted 15 May 2006 - 08:29 AM

Hi, very intresting thread!

Im from Sweden and have found out that Im getting really sick from potatoes. Ive realized Im intolerant to "Nightshades". My doctor knows really nothing about this, so I have to figure this one out for myself.

Ive read alot and think Ive got a clear picture, its getting clearer anyhow. :)
But I still wonder if ordinary White- and blackpepper, the one you sprinkle on your food is a nightshade?

Do anyone have any good links for me about nightshade-intolerans!

Posted Image
  • 0

#30 BRUMI1968

 
BRUMI1968

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 999 posts
 

Posted 18 May 2006 - 08:55 PM

Hi everyone! New here, and surprised to find others who can't eat nightshades, though really it is no mystery that they would make folks sick, since they are poison. I had eliminated virutally everything from my diet and was still having intestinal problems; then hit on potatoes. I should've known since I have not been able to eat cooked tomatoes without throwing up since I was a kid (always sick after spaghetti and pizza).

It sure is hard getting gluten free waffles and the like, since many of them are made with potato starch.

As to the spice pepper, it comes from the Piper nigrum plant, and is a seed. It is not a nightshade. Black pepper is harvested when the seeds/berries are half ripe, then they are let to dry. Green pepper corns are picked early, and white peppercorns are picked when fully ripe, then soaked in brine to get off the shell and release the white pepper. Interestingly, pepper sends a message from the mouth to the tummy telling it to start churning up some juices because it's about to get food. It is an appetite stimulant in that way. It also, apparently, hides the lack of freshnes of food, and was therefore highly valued in the Middle Ages when food might be scarce now and again.

Tobacco, though, is a nightshade.
  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: