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Anti-Candida Diet - Seeds Vs. Grains
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Hi Everyone,

 

Just starting to work on my candida issues and it looks like just taking some plain old Candex is not gonna do it and I need to make some dietary changes as well.

 

I am just learning about the Candida diet, and how grains are a no no because of their starches but seeds are okay. Can someone please explain to me how this works? I mean as far as I know, seeds also have starches in them...so how come starch in the grains are not good for candida over-growth people but seeds are okay??

 

Thank you so much,

God Bless.

 

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Hi Ray!

 

I know a great deal about food...but can't answer your question off the top of my head...maybe try a different internet site or google your question.

 

Take care :)

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ps...i can't do grains or seeds so i am probably not a reliable source ;)

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Hi Everyone,

 

Just starting to work on my candida issues and it looks like just taking some plain old Candex is not gonna do it and I need to make some dietary changes as well.

 

I am just learning about the Candida diet, and how grains are a no no because of their starches but seeds are okay. Can someone please explain to me how this works? I mean as far as I know, seeds also have starches in them...so how come starch in the grains are not good for candida over-growth people but seeds are okay??

 

Thank you so much,

God Bless.

 

If you have candida issues, you probably need some serious systemic prescription strength anti-fungals (e.g. Diflucan).  The candida diet requires that you eliminate or minimize sugars/starches and that includes even fruit.  All meats/fish must be fresh and not processed.  You should be eating veggies morning, noon and night!  I was able to stick to this regime for about a month (while on a four day rotational diet).  I was so hungry that I started to include some squashes and sweet potatoes.  Eventually, I added some whole grains back into my diet as I began to feel better.  I only ate one piece of fruit a week as a treat. 

Please try to find a medical doctor who can help you through this process.   Drugs, diet and probotics are required for a full recovery. 

(Just my opinion and I’m not a doctor!)

P.S.  What were your symptoms and what might have caused your candida issues?  Seeds?  Eat them in moderation after the first month.

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Wen you were diagnosed with this, what did the doctor say? Just ask around? :(. Seriously, like cycling lady said, take you meds and find a good website or book or a pamphlet from your docotor that describes how you should eat.

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Diflucan is not very effective against Candida any more,  it's also a heavy duty drug that makes you feel BAD. I'd suggest you take amphotericin B instead because it's more effective.

 

The immune system disease I have "Kimura's" is in theory (and I agree) caused by excessive immune system stimulation by candida even a tiny sub-clinical amount while you have a damaged gut is enough. I'm down to diet and heavy exercise as the best things to help keep it's levels down.  Probiotics work and work well BUT don't take any yoghurt that's made with streptococcus thermophilus as this can be a very immune system stimulating in a bad way bacteria in weakened guts. Better to make your own yoghurt without that one, it's in a lot of commercial greek style yoghurts. 

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