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Children With Negative Iga, Have 2 Genes, No Specific Symptoms. Go gluten-free?
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I am gluten free based on an elimination diet done back in 2004. I never had a blood test because I had been gluten free for a while but my symptoms disappeared when I went gluten free. I never had further testing because I didn't want to load on gluten to have them done since I am doing well. A few years back I did get a genetic test done through my doctor and I have the DQ2 gene.

 

I recently had my children tested. The genetic tests were done through Enterolab and the IGA tests were done through their doctor. They both have tested positive for two genes. Either DQ2/DQ2 or DQ2/DQ8 (not sure which my husband carries as he refuses to be tested). They do not have the HLA-DQB1. Their Transglutimate IGA tests were negative and were <1.2 (standard <4.0). Their Celiac Disease Antibodies were 110 and 46 (standard 29-256).

 

Based on this information would you go ahead and switch them to gluten-free? They have no bowel or digestive issues, they are not vitamin deficient, and do not have cognitive issues. 

 

Thanks for any insight you can provide.

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Just if it makes it a bit easier at home.  My kids have some gluten and they are old enough to keep it on thier counter and be careful.  If I fix meals, its gluten free.  I used to try to fix gluten-free pasta for me and gluten for them and it got too confusing keeping spoons out of the wrong pot, Unless one person was responsible for one pot and one for the other.

 

 

 

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/what-percentage-of-those-with-the-genes-will-develop-celiac-disease

 

 

What percentage of those with the genes will develop celiac disease?

Less than 5% of those with one or both genes will develop the disease

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My kids also tested negative on the tTG IgA. Two out of three of them had some mild symptoms though (frequent BMs, some stomach aches, headaches, some behavioral issues, short stature in one son) and going gluten-free has helped. It wan't a dramatic improvement because they did not have dramatic symptoms. One son appears to have no gluten issues but he still had a growth spurt like his brothers did after being gluten-free for a few months.

 

I mentioned this because I guess I'm one of those extremists who believes that our present day, heavily genetically modified wheat (it went form 6 chromosomes 150 years ago to 40 something today) really isn't good for anybody. I see it as fake food, albeit tasty fake food.  ;) LOL I think it's a good idea to drop wheat, and I don't think it needs to be substituted with gluten-free products (which aren't very healthy either). Ideally it should be replaced with whole foods...

 

I'm stepping off my soap box now. :)

 

I agree with Karen, it looks like there is no real need to make them eat gluten-free from a gluten intolerance stand point, but it would make it simpler in the kitchen for you if they are. If you want to remove gluten foods for nutritional reasons, I say go for it.  :)

 

Best wishes.

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Since both my husband and I have celiac disease,  I have made my house gluten-free with the exception of a few cereal bars, cereal and cookies I purchase for my daughter as a treat.   I even purchased PB & J frozen sandwiches so I don't have to buy bread and it's a fast lunch on those early mornings she needs to be at school early.   She likes all the gluten-free items that I bake and freeze.  While my husband was just gluten-free, I'd cook two different pots of pasta.  It was a hassle!  

 

I do all the cooking, but I have reserved some Tupperware, spoons, a pot and frying pan for my daughter to use.  We still have some mac and cheese and noodles that her friends devour when they are over (and it's cheaper!)  Her name is on those utensils and cookware.  She also has her own toaster, but lately she's just been eating gluten-free bread since being a newbie, I can't be tempted with glutened items yet.  I have managed over the years to let them eat ice cream and eggs in front of me, but I have substitutes that I like and I don’t’ feel deprived.. 

 

So, I'd go gluten free as much as possible with your kids and husband.  Less chance of cross contamination.  As long as you're eating healthy foods (fiber and whole grains), your kids should be fine.  I have read that in one study 50% of celiac disease patients tested and who have been gluten-free for 10 years (healed digestive system) were considered malnourished.  Eating refined gluten-free foods is not good!  We eat lots of veggies even for breakfast.   We reserve cereal like Chex just for camping/emergency foods.  I cook whole grains like brown rice porridge, quinoa and buckwheat (yum, quinoa with cocoa and banana!) and my daughter and husband love it.   I've always cooked popcorn on the stove because we don't have allergies and it's yummy and visiting kids love it. 

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Thank you all. I was planning to make the house almost 100% gluten free. I guess I just needed some extra support in that area. My husband kind of scoffs at the idea. He is supportive but change is hard for him. It is a pain to fix everything separate and have separate toasters, etc. Over the summer I will slowly switch the house to be mostly gluten free. He probably won't even realize. lol. 

 

Thank you again.

 


 

 

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Before you make your kids gluten free get them tested for DGP-IgG.

 

DGP-IgG is the most sensitive Celiac blood test for children.

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The gene tests are only about the risk for celiac.

You do not really need to switch the kids to gluten-free since they have no symptoms or problems.

 

But do keep testing them for celiac every three years if they continue eating gluten.

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I am gluten free based on an elimination diet done back in 2004. I never had a blood test because I had been gluten free for a while but my symptoms disappeared when I went gluten free. I never had further testing because I didn't want to load on gluten to have them done since I am doing well. A few years back I did get a genetic test done through my doctor and I have the DQ2 gene.

 

I recently had my children tested. The genetic tests were done through Enterolab and the IGA tests were done through their doctor. They both have tested positive for two genes. Either DQ2/DQ2 or DQ2/DQ8 (not sure which my husband carries as he refuses to be tested). They do not have the HLA-DQB1. Their Transglutimate IGA tests were negative and were <1.2 (standard <4.0). Their Celiac Disease Antibodies were 110 and 46 (standard 29-256).

 

Based on this information would you go ahead and switch them to gluten-free? They have no bowel or digestive issues, they are not vitamin deficient, and do not have cognitive issues. 

 

Thanks for any insight you can provide.

Maybe one of the genetic wizards here could comment.. If one of your kids is DQ2DQ2, and the other is DQ2/DQ8,  it would seem that your husband would be DQ2/DQ8???

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Since the test back then only showed DQ2, then it means the other parent has DQ8.

It looks like mother has DQ2&DQ2 (but not sure two are present) and father must have DQ8 AND DQ2

 

There is a very very slight chance the test back then missed DQ8 in the mother since that test for DQ8 is not so sensitive, at least back then.

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Since the test back then only showed DQ2, then it means the other parent has DQ8.

It looks like mother has DQ2&DQ2 (but not sure two are present) and father must have DQ8 AND DQ2

 

There is a very very slight chance the test back then missed DQ8 in the mother since that test for DQ8 is not so sensitive, at least back then.

thanks!

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