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Is Genetically Modified Wheat Common Now-Days Responsible For This Condition?


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#31 Sara-Chicago

 
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Posted 29 July 2013 - 07:34 PM

It is an absolute lie that wheat has not been genetically modified.  "Splicing" - how do you define splicing, exactly? Do people think that splicing is done with a knife? No! the genome is too small! it is done with chemicals.

 

How was the genetic modification done? Here is an excerpt from another site:

 

Modern wheat has been hybridized (crossing different strains to generate new characteristics; 5% of proteins generated in the offspring, for instance, are not present in either parent), backcrossed (repeated crossing to winnow out a specific trait, e.g., short stature), and hybridized with non-wheat plants (to introduce entirely unique genes). There are also chemical-, gamma-, and x-ray mutagenesis, i.e., the use of obnoxious stimuli to induce mutations that can then be propagated in offpspring. This is how BASF’s Clearfield wheat was created, for example, by exposing the seeds and embryos to the industrial chemical, sodium azide, that is highly toxic to humans.


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#32 kareng

 
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Posted 29 July 2013 - 07:39 PM

It is an absolute lie that wheat has not been genetically modified. "Splicing" - how do you define splicing, exactly? Do people think that splicing is done with a knife? No! the genome is too small! it is done with chemicals.

How was the genetic modification done? Here is an excerpt from another site:

Modern wheat has been hybridized (crossing different strains to generate new characteristics; 5% of proteins generated in the offspring, for instance, are not present in either parent), backcrossed (repeated crossing to winnow out a specific trait, e.g., short stature), and hybridized with non-wheat plants (to introduce entirely unique genes). There are also chemical-, gamma-, and x-ray mutagenesis, i.e., the use of obnoxious stimuli to induce mutations that can then be propagated in offpspring. This is how BASF’s Clearfield wheat was created, for example, by exposing the seeds and embryos to the industrial chemical, sodium azide, that is highly toxic to humans.

On THIS site, if you are giving scientific evidence and quotes, please state and link to the source.


Edited to fix some bizarre typo or spell correct!

Edited by kareng, 29 July 2013 - 07:46 PM.

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#33 psawyer

 
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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:05 PM

Here is an excerpt from another site:
 
Modern wheat has been hybridized (crossing different strains to generate new characteristics; 5% of proteins generated in the offspring, for instance, are not present in either parent), backcrossed (repeated crossing to winnow out a specific trait, e.g., short stature), and hybridized with non-wheat plants (to introduce entirely unique genes). There are also chemical-, gamma-, and x-ray mutagenesis, i.e., the use of obnoxious stimuli to induce mutations that can then be propagated in offpspring. This is how BASF’s Clearfield wheat was created, for example, by exposing the seeds and embryos to the industrial chemical, sodium azide, that is highly toxic to humans.

What other site? You must provide the source, and if it is a web site, provide the link.
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#34 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 30 July 2013 - 06:36 AM

This article explains the study done that shows the increased incidence of celiac in the US ---from the blood samples taken during the 1950's.

 

Someone mentioned this study earlier in the thread.

 

http://www.mayo.edu/...ac-disease-rise

 

It also discusses "modern wheat" as a "potential culprit" . This article is from 2010. The research is ongoing.

 

 

"Dr. Murray lists several possible environmental causes of celiac disease. The "hygiene hypothesis" suggests the modern environment is so clean that the immune system has little to attack and turns on itself. Another potential culprit is the 21st century diet. Although overall wheat consumption hasn't increased, the ways wheat is processed and eaten have changed dramatically. "Many of the processed foods we eat were not in existence 50 years ago," Dr. Murray says. Modern wheat also differs from older strains because of hybridization. Dr. Murray's team hopes someday to collaborate with researchers on growing archival or legacy wheat, so it can be compared to modern strains."


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#35 AlwaysLearning

 
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Posted 30 July 2013 - 05:27 PM

Though I haven't read every link in this thread, I have done some reading about "modern wheat" and can't buy into that concept as the cause of gluten allergies. Aside from some types containing more gluten which could mean that people are suffering more extensive damage faster, I think most of the increase in diagnosis comes from increased awareness and scientific study/knowledge.

In hindsight, I realize that many of the things I had even as a child can be attributed to my gluten allergy, long before genetic modification was practiced and before some of the most intensive selective breeding practices had noticeable results on wheat. Same goes for my sister so we're talking 40 years ago.

And though my sister and I are the only ones in my family who have accepted that we have gluten allergies, I definitely suspect that some of the many mood and health issues that "run in" my mother's side of the family are directly related to gluten ... and that goes back way beyond the past 50 years. But don't tell them that. My mother practically brags about not having allergies so I doubt she could accept the concept of something possibly being "wrong" with her. There is something to be said about lack of cultural acceptance suppressing reporting.

I don't buy that the hyper-hygienic household has a direct link to gluten allergies. Sure it is a problem, but I don't think it is a cause in this case, at most an aggravating factor.

But the overall awareness of what gluten allergies are, both in the medical community and amongst the general population seems to have only started in the past five years. I give a ton of credit to the internet in general, and specifically sites like this one, for allowing people to become informed and ask their doctors for the right tests.

I basically spent 22 years looking for a diagnosis, and if I hadn't put the thought into a doctor's head, would probably still be searching.


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#36 Sara-Chicago

 
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Posted 31 July 2013 - 03:59 PM

It is important to look at how Europe is handling this.  Their approach is extremely different.  To use an example in another area of "health," in Europe, there are about 10,000 chemicals considered to be dangerous to human health, and which are therefore outlawed for use in personal care products.  In the U.S., it is 9.  (yes, 10,000 versus 9  !!)  (Among the 10,000 chemicals not allowed in Europe but allowed in the U.S.: mercury, lead, Parabens, Phenylenediamine, Formaldehyde and its releasers, Phthalates, PEG, Triclosan & Triclocarban). 

http://www.healthyto...s_FactSheet.PDF

 

(Why personal care products? Because absorption through the skin to the bloodstream is a highly effective form of absorption – this is the principle behind nicotine patches and other patches http://www.sv.vt.edu.../apps/body.html ).  Substances applied to the skin make their way into the bloodstream and then to every cell in the body.) 

I mention this to show you the barometer of how permissive the U.S. for substances which are proven to be highly toxic to the human body. 

In Europe they are looking to prove the following:

“A number of research centres in Italy are analysing whether there is a cause-and-effect link between genetically modified wheat and celiac disease stemming from the altered amino acid sequence found in the gliadin of GMO wheat.”

In view of the above, can the Commission say whether it intends to:

explore the link between genetically modified wheat and celiac disease, as posited by a group of Italian doctors?”

http://www.europarl.... DOC XML V0//EN


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#37 psawyer

 
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Posted 31 July 2013 - 05:25 PM

In the U.S., all wheat (unless specifically labeled organic / non-GMO) is genetically modified and has a completely different gene sequence.  It contains not only gluten, but also a brand-new thing, never before seen in the world, and created as a result of the gene-splicing: "Gliadin."
 
A basic sumamry of gliadin is that humans cannot break it down.  The European parliament and doctor's groups throughout Europe are currently conducting massive studies to prove that the body's difficulty in breaking down "Gliadin" - which the human body cannot break down - is the key factor in the body starting to intelligently react ALSO against Gluten.


In Europe they are looking to prove the following:
“A number of research centres in Italy are analysing whether there is a cause-and-effect link between genetically modified wheat and celiac disease stemming from the altered amino acid sequence found in the gliadin of GMO wheat.”

 
Two days ago, in another topic (quoted above), you said that gliadin was only present in US wheat--only because of genetic modification (gene splicing).
 
Today you say that in Europe they are investigating whether the gliadin in US wheat being different from that in Europe is a problem?
 
So, does wheat in Europe contain gliadin? Is it different? Will you change your mind again in another two days?
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