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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Battling No Food
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54 posts in this topic

 

 

One of my personal emergency food favorites?  Peanut butter and fluff sandwich......YUM!

and no refrigeration necessary!  genius!!!  :D  when i have pb&j, i tell myself the jelly is One Serving of Fruit and i'm well on my way to satisfying my daily requirement HAAHAAA! i'm so healthy lololz

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Before I knew I was non celiac gluten intolerant, I was 'mostly' wheat free.

If I ate wheat, maybe just half a piece of toast, the next day I would have 2 slices. Within a week I would be eating cakes and pastries every day. It would stop after about 3 weeks, when I would be very violently sick.

I am not proud of this.

It happened about every 18 months.

While I was going through diagnosis, my husband said he thought something must be medically wrong, as he had never known me not do something I wanted to.

When I got diagnosed and went totally gluten free, the cravings went.

When I get glutened now, I eat like it is going out of fashion, and feel starving for 2 days. I stay gluten free, and it passes.

I see now that when I was eating all that 'healthy' rye and getting cross contaminated, I never gave myself a chance to get better, so the occasional binges happened.

I feel better physically now I have quit the gluten, but I also feel better about myself now I have control.

If you make it this far OP, I hope you can pick out some useful information from everything here, and give yourself the gluten-free future you deserve.

Mw

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Mental health problems are a symptom of celiac disease just as much as diarrhea is.

 

I wonder where you'd be without your husband supporting you Gemini, if instead he thought your diet was a sham and decided to divorce you over it, instead of baking you bread. You're 'molly-coddled' at home regularly as far as I can tell.

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God knows we've all made mistakes, some more than others. There have been times I have had to be beat over the head with my mistakes to learn a lesson. In the past year and a half I have found myself out of the house and hungry, either without the budget for food (not no money, simply not money budgeted for food) or without somewhere to get something to eat. So I know exactly how it feels to be hungry and have either nothing or nothing safe to eat. I have wandered around convenience stores with my multiple intolerances and found nothing safe for me. I know what I would do in that situation because I have been there, hungry and with food I could eat but that wasn't safe for me. I either got water, and went hungry, or I got nothing. Because no amount of momentary satisfaction for that hunger is worth being sick and risking my life for.

 

And if I ate gluten on purpose? My husband wouldn't support me, what you are calling molly coddling. He would leave me to s*** all over myself and clean myself up when I felt better enough to. He would tell me it was my own damn fault, that he didn't want to hear me complain, and that any mess was my problem to deal with. Which imo is 100% fair, since it would be 100% my fault for being a dumbass. Molly coddling is babying a celiac who won't stop eating wheat. Being supportive is giving a helping hand to someone who is helping themselves. Huge difference.

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(is it odd that the OP hasn't replied at all? Probably scared them off)

 

Well, obviously and unfortunately this does not seem to have been a hypothetical. And yup, if you've put yourself in a situation where there's absolutely nothing in your house, or even someone else's house, that you can eat, you're just going to have to suck it up and hold out until you can get to the store the next day. I hate being hungry, get all foggy headed and weak and awful, but I'd rather be that temporarily than eat gluten and suffer for several days.

 

Tough love is tough, but if you don't have your act together by now, well... that's pretty unfortunate and you really should look at why it keeps happening.

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(is it odd that the OP hasn't replied at all? Probably scared them off)

 

.

 

 

Looking at past posts, the OP rarely responds to what he has posted.  Hopefully, he reads them.

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How about you tell me why you, personally, would get into the situation that the OP gets into, and furthermore, chooses to eat the gluten instead of not eat the gluten. And then think about why you'd continually do such a thing. The answer "I would never do that" isn't allowed. Place yourself in a state of mind and social context where that would be what YOU would do, no matter how ridiculous or unlikely it would be. Now tell me that getting outside help wouldn't be one of the best things to help you, or that you would be in a perfectly healthy mental state.

 

"As I pointed out, she may have housemates who are gluten eaters--and to her, all of their food is available and tempting--but she is overlooking the fruits, veggies and other foods she could be eating."

 

And this is just as assumptive as what I said, if not moreso. But I'm not bashing you for saying that, unlike you who so quickly pointed out that perhaps I am wrong.

In any case, I'm not even contradicting that, I am saying that someone who is that weak-willed as to have their roommates affect them so, is someone who I would say could benefit greatly from outside, professional help, or from avoiding the temptation as much as possible, via something like moving out. You wouldn't suggest to an alcoholic to live with people who drank at every meal and simply tell them to choose orange juice without vodka and expect it to work.

 

I don't see how it is anything but crystal clear that the OP has willpower problems that need to be addressed. As has been pointed out, 4 years is a very long time to still be succumbing to this.

 

To anyone who is confused or angered by the OP's actions, then you obviously don't understand them and so your advice probably isn't going to be the type that will work for them.

 

 

you keep turning this hypothetical scenario into a bigger one.

 

She/he posed a question and I gave a reasonable answer.

 

You may not like it. So be it.

 

But I would never assume anything about someone's "mental health status", not my job.

 

And you are being abusive and rude to another member with your "molly-coddling" remark...and I'd like to remind you about Rule #1.

 

so, let's take a break.

 

The OP has not even returned.

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On this thread, we are compiling a list of easy to keep in your house, or on your person, snacks for when there is nothing to eat.  Perhaps that would be helpful to you?

 

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/101748-favorite-emergency-food/

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Mental health problems are a symptom of celiac disease just as much as diarrhea is.

 

I wonder where you'd be without your husband supporting you Gemini, if instead he thought your diet was a sham and decided to divorce you over it, instead of baking you bread. You're 'molly-coddled' at home regularly as far as I can tell.

Oh, my ....where to begin?

 

I would never have a husband who would respond that way because I would never pick a husband who behaved like that.  We all subconsciously are drawn to certain personality types, most likely shaped from what we learn in our childhood from watching our parent's relationships, and that can work both ways. You can't tell anything, cavernio, because you can't get past that attitude of yours.  I work as hard as my husband yet I am the one with the long commute. So, he is gracious enough to bake me bread because I don't have time.  I, in turn, do things for him, and that's what marriage is all about. There is no reason to molly coddle at home because we are equals who treat each other with respect and pull our own share of the load. This is what I wish for everyone to experience in a marriage but sadly, it's not always so.

 

You insist on doing battle with those who have a healthier attitude about being and staying gluten-free than some posters who have posted before and still continue in their destructive behavior.

There is only so much compassion and patience in this world with those who choose to detour from the diet and then make excuses, on a forum, and ask for answers to their questions, when they know what some of those answers will be. Honest, truthful answers, in today's society, are not welcome unless they are wrapped in sugar and we behave like enablers to those seeking answers they already know.  You can only whine so much before it's time to take control of your life.  It's all about choices.

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And my husband has also made bread for us when I was so ill I could barely walk or think.

 

That's not molly-coddling, that's compassion. 

 

And anyway, the snarky comment  that was made is irrelevant to the discussion which, in my opinion, has been derailed.

 

Karen has posted a thread to help people "stock up" on emergency food.Let's channel this into a more positive discussion, shall we?

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I'm pretty positive there is more to this story.

I'm listening.

go ahead,

over-

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The original poster started this topic, and may have actually read the first reply, but has not logged in since before the second reply was posted.

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The original poster started this topic, and may have actually read the first reply, but has not logged in since before the second reply was posted.

Ah, ok thanks. I will wait then :)

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Wooops?! someone just made me aware my last post ended up in a place that give the appearance of encouraging conflict. 

For clarity.... it was intended to address the person beginning this thread. I would like to hear more from that person to better respond if you wouldn't mind please when you get back to reading the thread?

Thank you

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I have been in the unfortunate position of being out of food due to my house burning

down. It will most certainly freak you the **** out to be suddenly without access to food,

however, the situation described by the OP sounds chronic rather than acute in nature.

 

Considering that the OP might have mental health issues due to gluten consumption is

most certainly valid, given what we know of the disease, and counseling the OP in that

light is also most certainly valid. Counseling the OP in the 'tough love' light is also entirely

appropriate, given the amount of time they have been in the situation and the number of

years they have had available to them to rectify it.

 

Those two viewpoints do not need to be mutually exclusive, and arguing amongst

ourselves over them is less than constructive. I'm sure it's possible for each camp to offer

their advice and personal experience to the OP without having to comment on the other

viewpoints presented......

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Well UC, you certainly started an interesting thread!  :)

 

We have lots of ideas for you here.  But maybe something more local would be helpful too.  There are celiac support groups in Australia that you could talk to.  If you check the membership link on the main page for Celiac Australia it lists support groups in various areas around Australia.  Maybe a meeting with local people dealing with celiac would give you some ideas.  Usually the meetings in my area (DC) they have samples and gluten-free food for sale too.  So it might be worth going just for that?

 

http://www.coeliac.org.au/

 

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Firstly people need to calm down on the judgement and rhetoric, so I didn't answer in a week so what!

My doctor diagnosed a Coeliac at 86 calm down on the you'll be dead by 30 business, genetics overiding factor in everything why do some smokers die at 30 and some at 90 genetics.

 
My next decision would be to make a resolution to plan more.
 
You can freeze cooked rice in Sandwich bags and have cans of black or red beans in the pantry.  If you make gluten-free pasta, it's just as easy to make a whole bag of it as it is to make a small portion, then freeze single portion sizes.  Same with soups or chili or practically anything.  
 
Then you have to ask yourself a day or 2 in advance what you are going to eat the next couple of days, and move stuff from the freezer to the refrigerator.  
 
The staples I always keep are cheese, milk, tomato sauce, salsa, rice cakes,  corn or rice chips, peanut butter, eggs, various canned beans, frozen and canned fish,  romaine lettuce and root vegetables.
 
Even if you don't feel inspired to make something delicious, you can have something in your refrigerator or pantry to eat safely and avoid hunger pains.
 
Good luck, wish you well.

 

Yes planning is working I've been Gluten-Free for a while now somewhere between 2 and 4 weeks and it's just getting easier.

1) Find a 24 convenience store that sells nuts and bananas or apples.

2) Knock on a neighbor's door and see if they have a piece of fruit you can eat.

3) Don't eat, get up early the next day, and go shopping to fix the ridiculous state of food in the house.

 

Ok, #3 is a little snarky, but also meant a lot seriously.  If there is literally *NOTHING* in your house that doesn't have gluten in it, you have a very poor diet (and poor emergency planning skills)..  (Oooo... Come on people, flame me!  This is totally flame worthy!  I'll stand by it, but it's ripe for the bashing. :) )  Why do I say this?  Because fruit and vegetables do not contain gluten.  Because dairy (milk, yogurt, cheese, ice cream, etc.) do not contain gluten.  Because beans do not contain gluten.  Because rice does not contain gluten.  Because fats (oils, butters) do not contain gluten.  Because nuts and dried do not contain gluten.  (And many of these items (canned beans, canned vegetables, nuts, rice, canned meats) are useful "emergency" foods to have on hand in the case of a natural disaster.)  If *EVERY* food in your house contains gluten, you simply don't have a healthy variety of nutritious foods around you, which - many studies back this up - almost certainly means your diet as a whole does not have a healthy variety of nutritious foods.

 

I don't actually mean to sound like a "w"itch about this.  And it's not actually personal, though I'm responding to your (OP's) post.  It's a pet peeve of mine that people choose to bring unhealthy foods into their house and choose NOT to bring healthy foods into their house.  It's your responsibility (unless you are under ... let's say 15), to have some choices.  (Of course, there is the obvious exception for, as stated by PP, being homeless, destitute to the point where you have no food, and so on.  But, you have food in your house, and I don't recall you being a pre-teen, so that doesn't apply in this situation.)

 

Personally, in your situation, I would go find a store that was open (even if I had to drive half an hour) and fix the problem.  My health and my body is too important to treat it badly.

I am not definded by Coeliac and reserve the right to disregard it at any point I so choose.

Hasn't anyone seen fight club fridge? This is what the fridge of a bachelor generally looks like.

 

28btg8g.jpg

 

 

2uop828.jpg
 

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That picture is completely different than :

 

 

"The fridge is full of goods all with Gluten"

 

 

There really isn't anything much to eat in that one.  I don't see a bunch of gluten in there.  I guess I would eat the cheese, maybe the lettuce if there is a little salad dressing.  Looks like there might be a couple of potatoes?  Could microwave them and put the cheese on them.

 

 

 

 

"I am not definded by Coeliac and reserve the right to disregard it at any point I so choose."

 

Not sure what that means?  You don't have Celiac so this is really just a hypothetical question?  Or you just don't chose to treat your disease? 

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I am not definded by Coeliac and reserve the right to disregard it at any point I so choose.

 

I am guessing that you meant "defined" by Coeliac?  If that's the case, and you feel you can disregard it at any point, all I can say is....."Good luck with that"!  :rolleyes:

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28btg8g.jpg

 

 

2uop828.jpg

 

the first rule of 'fight club fridge' is we don't talk about fight club fridge...... 

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That looks suspiciously like an empty fridge, not a gluteny fridge as you described. At any rate, if you feel like your attitude is that you can just disregard your disease at any point just because you feel like it I'm not sure what you want from  us here. None of us will support that attitude, but if you need help or support in being gluten free we are more than happy to help.

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Celiac Disease doesn't have to define who you are, but it can't simply be ignored. Well, ok, it can if you want, but that would be choosing a lifetime of health issues. Sure, might not be life-threatening, but do you really want to spend your whole life feeling like crud most of the time?

 

Even in a "bachelor fridge" you should be able to scrounge up something safe to tie you over. Just make sure it's not moldy. 

 

Good luck

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The fridge is full of goods all with Gluten, but you're starving and you haven't eaten all day.

No shops are open

 

Discuss your next decision here and your reasoning...

 

Seems to be my downfall alot. My general decision is given in to hunger pains and pray for a better tomorrow (it never comes)

 

Well, eating gluten is harmful, while fasting for a night won't hurt. Since shops would eventually open in the morning, I'd rather go hungry until then than ruin my life for a few weeks. A little hunger doesn't hurt, gluten does .. Just think of it as poison.. which it is if you're celiac :-)

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Firstly people need to calm down on the judgement and rhetoric, so I didn't answer in a week so what!

My doctor diagnosed a Coeliac at 86 calm down on the you'll be dead by 30 business, genetics overiding factor in everything why do some smokers die at 30 and some at 90 genetics.

 

Yes planning is working I've been Gluten-Free for a while now somewhere between 2 and 4 weeks and it's just getting easier.

I am not definded by Coeliac and reserve the right to disregard it at any point I so choose.

Hasn't anyone seen fight club fridge? This is what the fridge of a bachelor generally looks like.

 

If you don't want to take responsibility for who you are and what your body is, ok.  But if you make that choice - and you're right to make that choice - don't go whining about the crappy outcome.  You made your choice, hence, you also accepted the consequences.  If you don't want to take responsibility for stocking your fridge at all, ok, but don't complain about being hungry, it was your choice to go hungry.  If you don't want to take responsibility to eat gluten free, ok, but don't complain about feeling unwell; it was your choice to feel unwell.

 

I know I sound unsympathetic.  And to a degree I am.  It's not "feathers ruffled" at all, it's just, why should I bother helping you when you clearly don't take any personal responsibility?  I require more personal responsibility out of my three year old.  (I'm not kidding either - not on big things that she's not cognitively able to handle, but things that are within her developmental range.)

 

If you want ideas on how people do take responsibility with minimum effort, great!  We can do that.

If you want ideas on how people find resources to make it easier to stay minimally responsible, great!  We can do that!

If you want ideas on how people deal with the psychological side of being dealt the crappy hand that is celiac, great!  We can do that!

 

If you just want to act like an irresponsible loaf who doesn't like that actions and choices sometimes have unpleasant consequences... Well, go ahead, but you'll probably get a lot more judgement, so be prepared for that consequence from that choice.

 

(And, by the way, the single guys I've known over time have a FAR better-stocked fridge than that.)

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Well, I was going to say something (I've been gone all day and just saw that UC has returned to read all our posts)..but I am too late because you guys have said it all. I'll just say "what they just said".

 

Kiddo, GO SHOPPING and stop glutening yourself. :)

Your attitude about this is all wrong.

It's not the worst thing on the planet to be a celiac.

Not by a long shot.

 

Guys who have a full fridge and a full bar and know how to cook are a helluva lot sexier than guys who do not.

Trust us women on this one.

I hope you get it together soon because life is too short to be pissed off 24/7.

(yes, I have seen your signature line and I see you changed it again.)

 

You could have the biggest group of supporters here if you'd get past the anger.

Best wishes.

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