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How To Heal Leaky Gut
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I'm just starting out and want to heal my leaky gut which I'm fairly certain is causing my arthritis.  I am taking probiotics.  I am removing the food that gives me inflammation which is gluten plus a number of other things.  I am wondering if anyone has had any success and what did they do.  How long did it take before improvement? And any other info would be appreciated.  

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You might want to try taking digestive enzymes. I was diagnosed two and a half years ago with celiac disease, and I was still having major intestinal symptoms until about a month ago when a doctor suggested I take digestive enzymes.  It has made an unbelievable difference.

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Hey Dancer,

 

As a leaky gut sufferer myself, I can tell you that your diet is the most important part of the equation. I have published several articles on this topic and made quite a lot of research...

 

You said that you have removed gluten as well as "number of other things". Can you tell us what those other things are and how/why you decided to remove them?

 

You can take as many supplements as you want, if you don't fix the root cause (what caused your gut to become more permeable in the first place) then you won't heal from this condition.

 

Main known causes are:

 

* Diet (grains, refined sugar, processed foods etc...)

* Alcohol

* Some kinds of medicines like NSAIDs

* Candida overgrowth

* Low stomach acid levels (it's a big one - most often this goes undiagnosed and causes a host of troubles)

* Zinc deficiency (cause for this is often low stomach acid levels because zinc is poorly absorbed when stomach acid is low --- on a side note, it's a kind of vicious cycle because stomach cannot produce enough acids when deficient in zinc)

 

If you want to heal from the condition you really need to find and address the root cause first.

 

After you find and work on the root cause, only then supplements will be useful (the idea is that it's useless to try to fix a hole if the digger is still in the place)... 

 

Don't think it will be fast - it will take quite some time, at least several months, and this is IF you do all things right.

 

Take care

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Hey Dancer,

 

As a leaky gut sufferer myself, I can tell you that your diet is the most important part of the equation. I have published several articles on this topic and made quite a lot of research...

 

You said that you have removed gluten as well as "number of other things". Can you tell us what those other things are and how/why you decided to remove them?

 

You can take as many supplements as you want, if you don't fix the root cause (what caused your gut to become more permeable in the first place) then you won't heal from this condition.

 

Main known causes are:

 

* Diet (grains, refined sugar, processed foods etc...)

* Alcohol

* Some kinds of medicines like NSAIDs

* Candida overgrowth

* Low stomach acid levels (it's a big one - most often this goes undiagnosed and causes a host of troubles)

* Zinc deficiency (cause for this is often low stomach acid levels because zinc is poorly absorbed when stomach acid is low --- on a side note, it's a kind of vicious cycle because stomach cannot produce enough acids when deficient in zinc)

 

If you want to heal from the condition you really need to find and address the root cause first.

 

After you find and work on the root cause, only then supplements will be useful (the idea is that it's useless to try to fix a hole if the digger is still in the place)... 

 

Don't think it will be fast - it will take quite some time, at least several months, and this is IF you do all things right.

 

Take care

Charles thanks for your post. To answer your question, I have removed a lot of things. I was very inflamed and was noticing after a short fast nearly everything I consumed aggravated my conditions. So now I have cut out all gluten. All forms of white carbs including potatoes sugar and rice etc. I've just cut out all grains now including corn etc. I cut out caffeine. Also nightshade veges except I've had chilli.

I cut out nuts because peanuts would give me stomach pain. Yesterday I tried walnuts (bad idea since I am now inflamed)

It's interesting that you mention the causes. I had some tests done a little while ago and I was very low in zinc. The doctor told me to take mega doses of zinc since I was also copper toxic. I am also now anemic. I am taking lots of supplements except I wasn't consistent with zinc until recently.

I'm kind of glad in a way that I am getting to the bottom of all of my health problems because for years I had so many other health problems that I stopped going to the doctor about them because they thought it psychological.

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Here is what I am doing to heal.

 

Avoiding gluten.

Avoiding other foods I am intolerant to.

Rotating my diet.

Taking pancreatic enzymes

Taking IgG.  I have also used Glutamine for my son's damaged gut.  Yeast like it, though.

Supplements to overcome nutrient depletion.

 

I have been working with a chiropractor trained in nutrition and a Functional medicine nurse with an Osteopathic doctor back up.  I think I think I am getting somewhere!

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Here is what I am doing to heal.

 

Avoiding gluten.

Avoiding other foods I am intolerant to.

Rotating my diet.

Taking pancreatic enzymes

Taking IgG.  I have also used Glutamine for my son's damaged gut.  Yeast like it, though.

Supplements to overcome nutrient depletion.

 

I have been working with a chiropractor trained in nutrition and a Functional medicine nurse with an Osteopathic doctor back up.  I think I think I am getting somewhere!

Thanks.  I may try pancreatic enzymes.  I have been told different things about them.  One of the things I was told is that your body can come to rely on them.  i do not know enough to know if there is any truth in this.  I tried glutamine and got the same very bad upper right quadrant pain I used to get whe I took protein powders.  this may be a co-incidence but I haven't had the nerve to try it again.

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Thanks.  I may try pancreatic enzymes.  I have been told different things about them.  One of the things I was told is that your body can come to rely on them.  i do not know enough to know if there is any truth in this.  I tried glutamine and got the same very bad upper right quadrant pain I used to get whe I took protein powders.  this may be a co-incidence but I haven't had the nerve to try it again.

 

 

According to Functional Medicine nurse, my villi were damaged too much to do the job of telling the pancreas to fire.  I was seeing capsules coming through undigested at times.  I guess I was dependent on the enzymes before I took them.  However, the nurse did tell me that the damage is still reversible.  If the villi recover, they will do their job!

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Charles thanks for your post. To answer your question, I have removed a lot of things. I was very inflamed and was noticing after a short fast nearly everything I consumed aggravated my conditions. So now I have cut out all gluten. All forms of white carbs including potatoes sugar and rice etc. I've just cut out all grains now including corn etc. I cut out caffeine. Also nightshade veges except I've had chilli.

I cut out nuts because peanuts would give me stomach pain. Yesterday I tried walnuts (bad idea since I am now inflamed)

It's interesting that you mention the causes. I had some tests done a little while ago and I was very low in zinc. The doctor told me to take mega doses of zinc since I was also copper toxic. I am also now anemic. I am taking lots of supplements except I wasn't consistent with zinc until recently.

I'm kind of glad in a way that I am getting to the bottom of all of my health problems because for years I had so many other health problems that I stopped going to the doctor about them because they thought it psychological.

 

You're welcome. I just finished a 16 day semi-fast (I was drinking the soup from bone broth) and it's very good for fighting inflammation. Maybe you could give this a try.

 

Did you hear about the GAPS diet from Dr Campbell? It's what I'm following. You can google it, I recommend reading her book, it's very good and it has been extremely helpful for me.

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I have found the below helpful 1. Probiotics

Our gut is full of “good”and friendly bacteria that help us properly break down and digest our food. They help keep our gut in check and prevent ‘bad’ bacteria from overgrowth. Unfortunately, these friendly bacteria can be depleted and disrupted by taking antibiotics, steroids, acid-blocking medications, eating a poor diet, and many other factors. Taking a highly concentrated dose (25-100 billion units a day) of probiotics on a daily basis can help you regain a healthy balance of bacteria in your gut.

2. L-Glutamine

L-Glutamine is an amino acid that is fundamental to the well-being of the digestive and immune systems. Glutamine is great for repairing damage to the gut, helping the gut lining to regrow and repair, undoing the damage caused by leaky gut, and reducing sugar cravings. usually 3-5 grams a day.

3. Digestive Enzymes

Digestive enzymes are plant or microbial-based supplements that support the breakdown, absorption, and utilization of macronutrients. Taken with meals, they work with the body’s own reduced supply of enzymes to achieve maximum digestion and support intestinal repair mechanisms.

4. Betaine Hydrochloric Acid (HCL)

Betaine hydrochloride (HCL) promotes optimal gastric acidity for support of protein digestion and absorption of minerals and other nutrients such as vitamin B12. There is simple at home test you can do to see if you have low stomach acid and are in need of HCL replacement. Begin to eat a meal and ⅓ of the way into your meal take 650 mg of HCL and then finish your meal. If you experience heartburn, you have sufficient levels of HCL. If you do not experience any burning sensation in your upper abdomen, then you likely would benefit from HCL at each meal.

5. Slippery Elm

It might have kind of a strange name, but slippery elm has been used as an effective gut healer for centuries in the United States. This supplement both contains mucilage and stimulates nerve endings in the body’s intestinal tract to increase natural mucus secretion, which is an instrumental part of the stomach’s protective lining and helps combat ulcers and excessive acidity in the digestive system. It also contains important antioxidants that help relieve inflammatory bowel symptoms.

6. Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL)

DGL is an herb that has been used for over 3,000 years in the treatment of digestive issues including ulcers and indigestion. It’s made from whole licorice, but the manufacturing process includes the removal of glycyrrhizin, which can cause an elevation in blood pressure. DGL supports the body’s natural processes for maintaining the mucosal lining of the stomach and duodenum.

7. Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow root is a multipurpose supplement that can be used for respiratory or digestive relief. Like slippery elm, it contains a high mucilage content. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining, heals ulcers, and treats both diarrhea and constipation by creating a protective lining on the digestive tract.

8. Caprylic Acid

Caprylic Acid, also known as octanoic acid, is a naturally occurring fatty acid that comes from coconut oil. Calcium and magnesium caprylates act as buffers, and may also help slow the dispersion and release of caprylic acid to support its activity throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Caprylic acid is known for it’s antiviral and antifungal activity. For those who feel that you may be suffering from Candida or yeast overgrowth this is a safe, effective and natural way to treat Candida.

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Charles thanks for your post. To answer your question, I have removed a lot of things. I was very inflamed and was noticing after a short fast nearly everything I consumed aggravated my conditions. So now I have cut out all gluten. All forms of white carbs including potatoes sugar and rice etc. I've just cut out all grains now including corn etc. I cut out caffeine. Also nightshade veges except I've had chilli.

I cut out nuts because peanuts would give me stomach pain. Yesterday I tried walnuts (bad idea since I am now inflamed)

It's interesting that you mention the causes. I had some tests done a little while ago and I was very low in zinc. The doctor told me to take mega doses of zinc since I was also copper toxic. I am also now anemic. I am taking lots of supplements except I wasn't consistent with zinc until recently.

I'm kind of glad in a way that I am getting to the bottom of all of my health problems because for years I had so many other health problems that I stopped going to the doctor about them because they thought it psychological.

What is left to eat?

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What is left to eat?

I get a chance to live a normal life, unlike my mother who had the same problems without the knowledge and lived an isolated life crippled with arthritis. It is worth it in my instance. Other people can make fun of my situation and be sarcastic but I know what I'm doing is right.

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I have found the below helpful

1. Probiotics

Our gut is full of “good”and friendly bacteria that help us properly break down and digest our food. They help keep our gut in check and prevent ‘bad’ bacteria from overgrowth. Unfortunately, these friendly bacteria can be depleted and disrupted by taking antibiotics, steroids, acid-blocking medications, eating a poor diet, and many other factors. Taking a highly concentrated dose (25-100 billion units a day) of probiotics on a daily basis can help you regain a healthy balance of bacteria in your gut.

2. L-Glutamine

L-Glutamine is an amino acid that is fundamental to the well-being of the digestive and immune systems. Glutamine is great for repairing damage to the gut, helping the gut lining to regrow and repair, undoing the damage caused by leaky gut, and reducing sugar cravings. usually 3-5 grams a day.

3. Digestive Enzymes

Digestive enzymes are plant or microbial-based supplements that support the breakdown, absorption, and utilization of macronutrients. Taken with meals, they work with the body’s own reduced supply of enzymes to achieve maximum digestion and support intestinal repair mechanisms.

4. Betaine Hydrochloric Acid (HCL)

Betaine hydrochloride (HCL) promotes optimal gastric acidity for support of protein digestion and absorption of minerals and other nutrients such as vitamin B12. There is simple at home test you can do to see if you have low stomach acid and are in need of HCL replacement. Begin to eat a meal and ⅓ of the way into your meal take 650 mg of HCL and then finish your meal. If you experience heartburn, you have sufficient levels of HCL. If you do not experience any burning sensation in your upper abdomen, then you likely would benefit from HCL at each meal.

5. Slippery Elm

It might have kind of a strange name, but slippery elm has been used as an effective gut healer for centuries in the United States. This supplement both contains mucilage and stimulates nerve endings in the body’s intestinal tract to increase natural mucus secretion, which is an instrumental part of the stomach’s protective lining and helps combat ulcers and excessive acidity in the digestive system. It also contains important antioxidants that help relieve inflammatory bowel symptoms.

6. Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL)

DGL is an herb that has been used for over 3,000 years in the treatment of digestive issues including ulcers and indigestion. It’s made from whole licorice, but the manufacturing process includes the removal of glycyrrhizin, which can cause an elevation in blood pressure. DGL supports the body’s natural processes for maintaining the mucosal lining of the stomach and duodenum.

7. Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow root is a multipurpose supplement that can be used for respiratory or digestive relief. Like slippery elm, it contains a high mucilage content. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining, heals ulcers, and treats both diarrhea and constipation by creating a protective lining on the digestive tract.

8. Caprylic Acid

Caprylic Acid, also known as octanoic acid, is a naturally occurring fatty acid that comes from coconut oil. Calcium and magnesium caprylates act as buffers, and may also help slow the dispersion and release of caprylic acid to support its activity throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Caprylic acid is known for it’s antiviral and antifungal activity. For those who feel that you may be suffering from Candida or yeast overgrowth this is a safe, effective and natural way to treat Candida.

Thank you for this post. It is awesome and comprehensive. I have utilised around half of these. I am off to the health food shop tomorrow to get the rest of them.

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You're welcome. I just finished a 16 day semi-fast (I was drinking the soup from bone broth) and it's very good for fighting inflammation. Maybe you could give this a try.

 

Did you hear about the GAPS diet from Dr Campbell? It's what I'm following. You can google it, I recommend reading her book, it's very good and it has been extremely helpful for me.

thanks Charles. I will look into it. I will look into bone broth since I don't think my body like l-glut amine.
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I have found the below helpful 1. Probiotics

Our gut is full of “good”and friendly bacteria that help us properly break down and digest our food. They help keep our gut in check and prevent ‘bad’ bacteria from overgrowth. Unfortunately, these friendly bacteria can be depleted and disrupted by taking antibiotics, steroids, acid-blocking medications, eating a poor diet, and many other factors. Taking a highly concentrated dose (25-100 billion units a day) of probiotics on a daily basis can help you regain a healthy balance of bacteria in your gut. 2. L-Glutamine

L-Glutamine is an amino acid that is fundamental to the well-being of the digestive and immune systems. Glutamine is great for repairing damage to the gut, helping the gut lining to regrow and repair, undoing the damage caused by leaky gut, and reducing sugar cravings. usually 3-5 grams a day. 3. Digestive Enzymes

Digestive enzymes are plant or microbial-based supplements that support the breakdown, absorption, and utilization of macronutrients. Taken with meals, they work with the body’s own reduced supply of enzymes to achieve maximum digestion and support intestinal repair mechanisms. 4. Betaine Hydrochloric Acid (HCL)

Betaine hydrochloride (HCL) promotes optimal gastric acidity for support of protein digestion and absorption of minerals and other nutrients such as vitamin B12. There is simple at home test you can do to see if you have low stomach acid and are in need of HCL replacement. Begin to eat a meal and ⅓ of the way into your meal take 650 mg of HCL and then finish your meal. If you experience heartburn, you have sufficient levels of HCL. If you do not experience any burning sensation in your upper abdomen, then you likely would benefit from HCL at each meal. 5. Slippery Elm

It might have kind of a strange name, but slippery elm has been used as an effective gut healer for centuries in the United States. This supplement both contains mucilage and stimulates nerve endings in the body’s intestinal tract to increase natural mucus secretion, which is an instrumental part of the stomach’s protective lining and helps combat ulcers and excessive acidity in the digestive system. It also contains important antioxidants that help relieve inflammatory bowel symptoms. 6. Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL)

DGL is an herb that has been used for over 3,000 years in the treatment of digestive issues including ulcers and indigestion. It’s made from whole licorice, but the manufacturing process includes the removal of glycyrrhizin, which can cause an elevation in blood pressure. DGL supports the body’s natural processes for maintaining the mucosal lining of the stomach and duodenum. 7. Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow root is a multipurpose supplement that can be used for respiratory or digestive relief. Like slippery elm, it contains a high mucilage content. It eases the inflammation in the stomach lining, heals ulcers, and treats both diarrhea and constipation by creating a protective lining on the digestive tract. 8. Caprylic Acid

Caprylic Acid, also known as octanoic acid, is a naturally occurring fatty acid that comes from coconut oil. Calcium and magnesium caprylates act as buffers, and may also help slow the dispersion and release of caprylic acid to support its activity throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Caprylic acid is known for it’s antiviral and antifungal activity. For those who feel that you may be suffering from Candida or yeast overgrowth this is a safe, effective and natural way to treat Candida.

I absolutely swear by slippery elm on so many levels. When my vocal cord was totally paralysed, I used to empty the capsules in hot water and drink as tea...so calming too and helped with my gerd. My vocal cord is now much better and breathing improved. I also took liquorice root which helped with digestive system. Thanks for the list, I will try caprylic acid.

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My five cents (apart from eliminating allergens)

 

Wild oregano oil - excellent for reducing candida (one of the main factors of leaky gut)

Licorice root (as I have adrenal fatigue in addition to leaky gut, I use the natural licorice, not DGL)

 

L-glutamine did a very good job for my son. It does not promote yeast (glutathione does - and although glutamine is a presecusor of glutathione, there is still a long road between the one and another)

But for me glutamine was bad :( Read that if you have reaction to sodium glutamate, you could cross-react to glutamine. looks my case.

 

Things that did not help rather:

probiotics - those do their input into oxidative stress unfortunately

caprylic acid - did not notice any effect

digestive enzymes - tried those for my son, had only temporary effect.

 

Thing that I am going to try - just ordered:

histamine breaking enzyme - daosin/histame:

http://www.sciotec.at/en/products/functional-food/daosin/

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