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Starbucks?!

starbucks cross contamination soy allergy

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21 replies to this topic

#1 MissHaberdasher

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 09:36 PM

Hey everyone,

 

I recently got a job as a barista at a Barnes and Noble Cafe. We serve Starbucks products (I call us a pretend Starbucks... same thing, really). This has fed my addiction to coffee, but unfortunately, I've been glutened. I have a few theories as to what it is, please let me know what your thoughts are!

 

1. I may have missed hidden glutens in the different syrups - caramel color has never put me off before, but I've never had it on an almost daily basis before.

2. Perhaps I'm developing an intolerance to soy?

3. Maybe, when I do the dishes, some gluten from pastries and dairy products splash back to my face and/or vaporize and end up in my body? We have a high-powered sprayer jet...thing... and no matter what I do it ALWAYS ends up splashing my face. 

4. I read somewhere that gluten intolerant folks will actually react to coffee itself. Thoughts? (http://drclark.typep...ising-news.html)

5. I handle all of the pastries and bake all of the products - even though I use gloves, could this be problematic?

 

I'm not NORMALLY highly sensitive to gluten - meaning, if I scrub a pan that has held normal pasta really REALLY WELL, I'll walk away feeling only slightly off, almost to a point where I don't notice it. Or, I can risk eating products with caramel color because I can't tell the difference... This might have changed, I don't know. 

 

I'm eliminating all soy products and all flavored syrups with caramel color for the next two weeks to find out if that's the cause. Has anyone else had this experience?

 

Thanks! 


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#2 psawyer

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 06:05 AM

Caramel color is one of those celiac urban myths that just won't go away.

Here is Shelley Case's take on it, from Gluten-Free Diet A Comprehensive Resource Guide:

Although gluten-containing ingredients (barley malt syrup and starch hydrolysates) can be used in the production of caramel color, North American companies use corn as it has a longer shelf life and makes a superior product. European companies use glucose derived from wheat starch, however caramel color is highly processed and contains no gluten.

[Emphasis in original]


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Peter
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Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
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#3 pricklypear1971

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:43 AM

5. I handle all of the pastries and bake all of the products - even though I use gloves, could this be problematic?


Yes. If you're playing with flour, you're probably inhaling.

Yes, glutening water spraying on your face is potentially problematic. Eventually, it will probably work itself into your mouth.

You are playing with gluten. Eventually, it will get you.

I wouldn't worry about any other intolerances until you can eliminate gluten - and in your current job, it appears you can't.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

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#4 MissHaberdasher

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:52 AM

Thanks psawyer, for clearing up that myth!! I'm happy to know I won't have to give up vanilla lattes, HA. 

 

And thank you, pricklypear1971... I'll talk to my manager and see if they can make some accommodations for me until this clears up. The dough, luckily, requires minimal handling (no kneading or anything- just place a cookie on a baking sheet and done) so it shouldn't be too eager to fly into the air, right? Perhaps if I ask others to handle it...

 

Oy. 


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#5 julissa

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:11 AM

oy is right. when I first went gluten free, my granddaughter came over and we baked cookies. we handled the flour and kneaded it, and I it didn't ever enter into my mind that I could have gotten glutened since I never ate any. well, totally wrong, and I was indeed glutened. after that I converted my  kitchen to a gluten free kitchen and never looked back.


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#6 pricklypear1971

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:13 AM

Thanks psawyer, for clearing up that myth!! I'm happy to know I won't have to give up vanilla lattes, HA.

And thank you, pricklypear1971... I'll talk to my manager and see if they can make some accommodations for me until this clears up. The dough, luckily, requires minimal handling (no kneading or anything- just place a cookie on a baking sheet and done) so it shouldn't be too eager to fly into the air, right? Perhaps if I ask others to handle it...

Oy.


I'm afraid you're being a bit naive...there's gluten all over your workplace. This is different than just walking around in a gluten world. You are fighting tremendous odds here. You're going to keep getting glutened. You can take every precaution - but the bottom line is you are working in a very high risk environment.

I sincerely hope you can make this work.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#7 MissHaberdasher

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:34 AM

I'm afraid you're being a bit naive...there's gluten all over your workplace. This is different than just walking around in a gluten world. You are fighting tremendous odds here. You're going to keep getting glutened. You can take every precaution - but the bottom line is you are working in a very high risk environment.

I sincerely hope you can make this work.

Ah, drat. This has been the best job - yeah the pay is low and the hours aren't ideal, but I've been in heaven. I really hope I don't have to give up this job. Thank you :)


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#8 MissHaberdasher

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:39 AM

Actually on second thought - I was house sitting for a month in a very gluteny house. Maybe it's a combination of things. Ugh, just... grr. 


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#9 pricklypear1971

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:53 AM

Actually on second thought - I was house sitting for a month in a very gluteny house. Maybe it's a combination of things. Ugh, just... grr.


It could be both, just one, neither...

I think what the root of the problem is you're struggling to accept how careful you may have to be? Cc is a tough lesson - it's easy to avoid gluteny food - cc is a different animal, though. You're constantly double-checking and reevaluating your surroundings and choices.

It's part of the acclimation process.

Sorry.
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Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today. ~ Mark Twain

Probable Endometriosis, in remission from childbirth since 2002.
Hashimoto's DX 2005.
Gluten-Free since 6/2011.
DH (and therefore Celiac) dx from ND
.
Responsive to iodine withdrawal for DH (see quote, above).

Genetic tests reveal half DQ2, half DQ8 - I'm a weird bird!

#10 tarnalberry

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 11:38 AM

Also, depending on your symptoms, it could simply be the increased caffeine. Look up the side effects of caffeine and see if anything sounds familiar,
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#11 Nikki2777

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 05:08 PM

Thanks psawyer, for clearing up that myth!! I'm happy to know I won't have to give up vanilla lattes, HA. 
 
And thank you, pricklypear1971... I'll talk to my manager and see if they can make some accommodations for me until this clears up. The dough, luckily, requires minimal handling (no kneading or anything- just place a cookie on a baking sheet and done) so it shouldn't be too eager to fly into the air, right? Perhaps if I ask others to handle it...
 
Oy.


The vanilla syrup is NOT gluten free. One of the saddest things I had to give up
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#12 kareng

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 05:32 PM

The vanilla syrup is NOT gluten free. One of the saddest things I had to give up


Why not? I think is has been in the past. Starbucks encourages us to read the labels as they could change syrups at any time. I think they do it to keep things interesting.
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#13 karichelle

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 05:57 PM

I'm almost afraid to go to Starbucks anymore because they don't want to give a straight answer on what drinks contain gluten and which ones don't -- they always give this canned response about not being able to state their drinks are gluten-free because of the pastry case. I get that there is a pastry case, but I'm not asking if CC can be 100% avoided, I am asking about the ingredients in the drink itself. Frustrating. I've been making my own at home...paid $6 for a bottle of gluten free flavor syrup at World Market and got some Starbucks K-cups at Costco.


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#14 Nikki2777

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 07:32 PM

Why not? I think is has been in the past. Starbucks encourages us to read the labels as they could change syrups at any time. I think they do it to keep things interesting.

I only know that when I was first diagnosed 3 months ago, I asked at my local Sbux and was told it was not gluten free.  I don't think I actually read the label, but I can't recall honestly (I was investigating a lot of things that first week).  Does it say on the website?


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#15 Juliebove

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 02:33 AM

If I were you, I wouldn't work around gluten, period.  My daughter does not have celiac but was gluten intolerant and she couldn't go into the bakery section of the grocery store.  Something about being where the stuff was being baked and the baked surrounding her made her feel unwell. 

 

Chances are, you are inhaling that stuff if you are around it.  My daughter is addicted to Starbucks so I see a lot of what goes on in those places.  Gluten everywhere! 

 

Are there any other coffee places where you might work?  Perhaps one with pre-packaged things so that you're not actually touching the stuff? 

 

We're in the Seattle area here so there are coffee places everywhere!  Most of the little drive up type places have far fewer food options and some seem to sell only pre-packed things like cookies and chips.  That might be an option.


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