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    • Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Store. For Additional Information: Subscribe to: Journal of Gluten Sensitivity

Eating Gluten Free Makes Me Starving!

28 posts in this topic

And btw, I will get those things that you say, once I get a job. Thanks so much :)

In the interim, eat proteins and fibers and vegetables. A little fruit. Try to stay away from sugar - and if you do coat it in fat (full fat ice cream).

Eat BEFORE you get hungry. Don't skip meals, always include a protein with every snack and meal.

That's how most handle hypoglycemia. You'll notice when you get it right.


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not sure anyone said this but...nuts and seeds! Protein Fat and Fiber! Larabars might help too, give you the idea you are eating a candy bar but it's all healthy and gluten-free.


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I'm not sure if I have this right but...


You think you're celiac but don't have an actual diagnosis?


You're currently having weight gain issues and are eating gluten.


You lose lots of weight when you eat gluten free.


You're anxious and don't want to talk to your mom about it.


1. If YOU think you're reacting to gluten and are currently experiencing weight gain issues, stop eating gluten.  The anxiety should start to solve itself over time.  Doesn't happen overnight.  Its a process.


2.  You are young and should experience intestinal healing if you have villous atrophy.  This will help you get the nutrients your body needs.  The long term effects of being gluten free are AMAZING if you are allergic to gluten.


3.  Address the weight loss bridge when you arrive to it.  My previous post is just one of many examples available for what you can do to cram calories and protein into your diet if you need them.  When I went gluten-free at first I lost LOADS of weight and had to pack calories for awhile to get it back up.  


4.  Don't let this process consume you and define you or your anxiety will continue.  Live every day that God gives you.  Don't ruin it on "Oh my God I accidentally let a piece of bread touch my finger".  If it happens, wash your hand and move on.  Don't sweat the small stuff.  You're going to have trial and error, slip-ups, we're human, do what you can do.


Unless you are having some seriously major issues you really don't need a bunch of doctors, tests, and appointments to help yourself.  However, over the long term, if you are celiac having the actual diagnosis is helpful to have for various reasons as you go to college or move into the workforce.  For example, if you're traveling for work, they may make extra accommodations for your travel dining if you have an allergy.  It's also important for your family physician to know if you are celiac over the long term because it could affect how aggressive he is in treating certain symptoms.


So...  If you're celiac, at some point, somehow, your doctor needs to know.  If your parents have insurance and if you are still covered on it make up an excuse to go to the doc for your sinuses or whatever and while you are there insist on a celiac blood test.  If you just go gluten free, start doing fine, and want the diagnosis in the future you'll have to do the gluten challenge and be forced to eat it in order to make the test work accurately.  It can't detect it if its not in your body.  And by then you could have healed enough that your body lets its guard down and you have a major reaction to it, which would not be fun.


My two cents...


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