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Discrimination
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I worked in restaurants as a hostess, and I can tell you waitstaff really don't like it if you bring your own food. That isn't what they get paid for, they feel you are taking away their money and it makes them resent you. If you've never worked in a restaurant you don't realize this but to the staff every seat has a dollar sign attached to it and your butt in that seat is a negative. And yes some staff will punish those you are with by doing bad things to their food! Like spitting in it or dropping it on the floor. I simply would not eat, it's safer because it's not quite the insult of bringing food in. That is like slapping the waiter and the cook in the face. (to their minds)

 

I've never brought my own food to a restaurant. I've seen the behavior behind the scenes when people did! 

Don't you think people should be educated about our problems to understand this. It's not right.

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It's not discrimination if the rules apply to everyone.  If you were told you couldn't bring in your gluten-free food, but could bring in regular food, that would be discrimination. 

 

A restaurant is not required to serve you food, nor are they required to let you bring in your own food.  What if you had cockroaches or other bugs mixed in with your snacks and you contaminated their restaurant?  

 

A carnivore can't demand meat at a vegetarian restaurant, nor can a vegan demand vegetables at a salami shop. 

 

In our case I think its discrimination. Under the Americans with disabilities act.

 

http://newsok.com/oklahoma-mother-says-muskogee-pizza-hut-discriminated-against-son/article/3627995

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From a legal point of view, this raises some interesting questions. There is no doubt there have recently been intriguing new ADA case rulings. The successful ADA lawsuit by a celiac student at Lesley University surprised a lot of us, and has led to changes in campus dining halls across the country.

 

But there is a difference. In the case of college, the student was charged for a year-round meal plan he couldn't eat, and the harm that food would cause him was clear.

 

Medically speaking, though, we don't need to eat anything during the few hours we're at a ball game. So I think the legal argument under ADA would be a tough fight, but doesn't mean it's impossible. (I notice that the mother in the article said she is not going to sue the restaurant.) Then again, I've seen restaurants closed in our town because the owner didn't make them wheelchair accessible... it's taken the legal community awhile to accept the notion of celiac disease as a disability, but the Lesly lawsuit opened that door.

 

I'm just just talking the legal aspects here, not the ethical/moral arguments.

 

 

ps. And no, I'm not a lawyer, just a reporter who's covered a lot of court trial and civil lawsuits.

Edited by gatita
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Frankly, your rights aren't being violated by being forced not to eat for the length of a baseball game.

 

Exactly!!!.

 

Not have a right to food at a baseball game? If that's the case then we shouldn't have the right to have water or bathrooms for that matter either. Why are they forced to have to provide that to everyone then?

That's a non sequitor. Your argument is not valid, sorry.

 

Gluten free food is not a necessity of life for the majority of people attending a ball game.

Bathrooms, however, are a different story.

 

I brought my own sandwich into the ball parks in Florida recently. But I have also managed to watch many games, movies, plays etc without filing my face. They just do not allow liquids to be brought inside.But, this is true ANYWHERE now: theaters, planes, etc.

 

The Americans with Disabilities Act does apply to celiacs attending college, for example--that they be provided with gluten free meals.

That's because they paid for it in advance---and because constantly eating food that was not G F would have been dangerous.

 

But no one is legally required to provide G F food for us at a ball game or a restaurant or in an airport, so you may as well get over it

now or you're going to be angry for the rest of your life and suing people left and right. And it costs a TON of money to bring about a lawsuit, so be prepared to rack up a lot of bills. :)  

 

 

I still can't believe they only let you through security at the airport with a bag of sunflower seeds. 

 

me neither.

 

 

Medically speaking, though, we don't need to eat anything during the few hours we're at a ball game. So I think the legal argument under ADA would be a tough fight, 

and a lost cause.

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In our case I think its discrimination. Under the Americans with disabilities act.

 

http://newsok.com/oklahoma-mother-says-muskogee-pizza-hut-discriminated-against-son/article/3627995

Only if you're required to be somewhere, or required to eat somewhere. 

 

If you have to go to a business meeting at a restaurant, your boss (not the restaurant) is required to provide you with safe food.

 

If you choose to go to a restaurant, you're on your own.  In the piece above, the kid did not have to eat there, did not even have to be there, and she brought in food from another restaurant that also has potential for cc.  I say no case.

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Only if you're required to be somewhere, or required to eat somewhere. 

 

If you have to go to a business meeting at a restaurant, your boss (not the restaurant) is required to provide you with safe food.

 

If you choose to go to a restaurant, you're on your own.  In the piece above, the kid did not have to eat there, did not even have to be there, and she brought in food from another restaurant that also has potential for cc.  I say no case.

 

Exactly...... what Jess just said.

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Exactly!!!.

 

That's a non sequitor. Your argument is not valid, sorry.

 

Gluten free food is not a necessity of life for the majority of people attending a ball game.

Bathrooms, however, are a different story.

 

I brought my own sandwich into the ball parks in Florida recently. But I have also managed to watch many games, movies, plays etc without filing my face. They just do not allow liquids to be brought inside.But, this is true ANYWHERE now: theaters, planes, etc.

 

The Americans with Disabilities Act does apply to celiacs attending college, for example--that they be provided with gluten free meals.

That's because they paid for it in advance---and because constantly eating food that was not G F would have been dangerous.

 

But no one is legally required to provide G F food for us at a ball game or a restaurant or in an airport, so you may as well get over it

now or you're going to be angry for the rest of your life and suing people left and right. And it costs a TON of money to bring about a lawsuit, so be prepared to rack up a lot of bills. :)  

 

 

 

me neither.

and a lost cause.

I believe there may be a case here. It just reminds me of the arguments against the whole disability movement, prior to every business being forced to be retrofitted to allow the disabled access to those places. I don't believe every place has to legally provide a gluten free option, what I am saying, and what I believe is a violation of my right is to deny a person with food allergies the right to bring in their own food to an event. In a way this sort of alienates us from public events. Just imagine how many of us would be able to stay at multiple day festivals if we werent allowed to bring in our own food. Do you see the point in this argument, in a way it is a violation of our pursuit of happiness.

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 Just imagine how many of us would be able to stay at multiple day festivals if we werent allowed to bring in our own food. Do you see the point in this argument, in a way it is a violation of our pursuit of happiness.

 

 

Originally, you were just talking about a 2-3 hours without "food".  Though I'm sure they had snacks you could have eaten & soft drinks, wine or water you could had to drink. 

 

I have been to all day events that do not allow outside food.  I have contacted them well in advance and nicely explained my problem.  I did not try to bring in foods or drinks that they sell.  Meaning, I brought a sandwich but bought my soda. 

 

Just because we have an "illness", doesn't mean the world or the government owes us.

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Only if you're required to be somewhere, or required to eat somewhere. 

 

If you have to go to a business meeting at a restaurant, your boss (not the restaurant) is required to provide you with safe food.

 

If you choose to go to a restaurant, you're on your own.  In the piece above, the kid did not have to eat there, did not even have to be there, and she brought in food from another restaurant that also has potential for cc.  I say no cas

So when does it become discrimination do you believe. By the way my post isn't just about this one incident I had but a recognization of discrimination against people with food allergies in all shapes and forms such as demeaning portrayals of celiacs. What I am saying is to start speaking up and speaking out against this. I'm sure all of us experience this type of treatment often and it isn't ok. So I guess I am calling on all of you guys to start making a stand and it starts with the little things.

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. Do you see the point in this argument, in a way it is a violation of our pursuit of happiness.

 

No, sorry kiddo, I just do not.

 

I am seeing a ball game, a play, a movie...I am still happy. 

I am not "alienated " in any way because I have celiac.

 

And this is not at all the same as accommodating  for a wheelchair. We have legs.

 

And celiac is not a "food allergy" so, you cannot use that as your basis. 

 

I think you need to stop viewing celiac as a disability and an excuse to get favorable attention.

IMHO

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. I'm sure all of us experience this type of treatment often 

 

 

Nope,  I really don't..... sorry!

For example, I just went to a wedding and they accommodated me and the other GeeFreers so well, I never gave my "status" as a celiac a single thought. Not once. (I had crackers and PB in my car in case I needed it, but I always do that)

 

I ate and drank and had a blast.

 

You really need to get over the thought that you are "owed something" hon. Just IMHO

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No, sorry kiddo, I just do not.

 

I am seeing a ball game, a play, a movie...I am still happy. 

I am not "alienated " in any way because I have celiac.

 

And this is not at all the same as accommodating  for a wheelchair. We have legs.

 

And celiac is not a "food allergy" so, you cannot use that as your basis. 

 

I think you need to stop viewing celiac as a disability and an excuse to get favorable attention.

IMHO

Last time I checked celiac disease was approved as a disability. Yes I know its an autoimmune disorder. Who's rights am I violating by preparing and taking my own food with me. The answer is nobody's!

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Medically speaking, though, we don't need to eat anything during the few hours we're at a ball game. So I think the legal argument under ADA would be a tough fight, but doesn't mean it's impossible.

 

The only exception I can think of and which I have never seen disputed by anyone about someone carrying food with them somewhere is when a diabetic carries a single or double high carb snack with them somewhere as an emergency food. Since these snacks are usually carried with their testing supplies (at least in my experience) there is no question about what the snack is for or that the person truly has a medical need that can't be denied. The reason that they would need this emergency supply even though food is sold is because if they get low blood sugar they would quite possibly not be able to get to a vendor and obtain food before becoming disoriented or losing consciousness.

 

Other than that specific need, I can think of no other in which during a several hour period there is any circumstance under which being denied food is a violation of anyone's rights whatsoever.

 

When does it become discrimination for us? When we are forced to be somewhere for a period long enough to miss a meal. Not like, oh the ball game is when I usually have supper... I mean seriously many hours. Or, when we are forced to be in a position where we are paying for food, such as the college student who was paying for a meal plan but was unable to obtain safe food. Other situations may include away from home work training we could be forced to attend where everyone's meals are provided but they refuse to provide us with something different or safe. (Of course if I had a brand new job, and I am looking at this being a distinct possibility in the next month with the away from home training for a few days, I would scope out the area before hand, pack food and buy my own things. I wouldn't piss off a new employer or do anything to seem "needy" to them.)

 

Look, I'm sorry you feel this way but I think it is the way you present yourself. You seem to thing you are entitled to something. When I make requests at restaurants, whether to bring my own food or be served safely I have good experiences because of how I approach the people I speak with. I have the same response with events and places that don't generally allow outside food. I think you just need to approach the topic differently.

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Nope,  I really don't..... sorry!

For example, I just went to a wedding and they accommodated me and the other GeeFreers so well, I never gave my "status" as a celiac a single thought. Not once. (I had crackers and PB in my car in case I needed it, but I always do that)

 

I ate and drank and had a blast.

 

You really need to get over the thought that you are "owed something" hon. Just IMHO

Not saying I'm owed anything, just want to be treated equal. Maybe you have never experienced discrimination first hand for having an illness, but it does exist and it isn't right and I am not the type of person that will sit down and shut up about it.

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Nope,  I really don't..... sorry!

For example, I just went to a wedding and they accommodated me and the other GeeFreers so well, I never gave my "status" as a celiac a single thought. Not once. (I had crackers and PB in my car in case I needed it, but I always do that)

 

I ate and drank and had a blast.

 

You really need to get over the thought that you are "owed something" hon. Just IMHO

This article is another example http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&celiac disease=1&ved=0CDAQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.science20.com%2Fscience_20%2Fceliac_trendy_disease_rich_white_people-93422&ei=bFa2UYD8NKObjALbg4Fw&usg=AFQjCNHvTKP0BW0xv5QLY1-J7PTxhjp53Q&sig2=2Q22o-g6EMuIEXQSx6SjUw&bvm=bv.47534661,d.cGE

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Maybe if you had long undiagnosed celiac and it created OTHER health conditions, illnesses and diseases causing permanent damage, you MIGHT be able to prove a disability under the disabiilites act. Good luck with that.

I think you just have an ax to grind at this point.

 

Good luck.

 

"Evaluating Your Residual Functional Capacity

If your symptoms of celiac disease are not severe enough to equal one of the disability listings above, then the next step is for the SSA to determine your residual functional capacity (RFC). Your RFC describes the most amount of work that you can perform, and is labeled as sedentary, light, medium, or heavy work. To determine your RFC, the SSA will evaluate your ability to perform work tasks such as sitting, standing, walking, interacting with coworkers and supervisors, and following simple instructions.

If you can't perform at least sedentary work (for instance, an inability to sit for six hours per day and stand/walk for two hours per day), you should be found disabled.

If you are over age 50, you could be found disabled even if you can perform sedentary or light work, if your education and prior job skills didn't prepare you to do sedentary or light work. 

It would be helpful for your doctor to write out an opinion stating any limitations that you have as a result of your celiac disease. If you need to take frequent rest room breaks throughout the day, your RFC should include that limitation. In addition, if you suffer from any type of abdominal pain that could affect your ability to concentrate on tasks, this should be in your RFC. If you are unable to work on a regular basis, or you would miss several days of work per month as a result of your disorder, then this should be in your RFC, and the SSA could find you disabled."

 

http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/resources/social-security-disability-coverage/benefits-celiac-disease.htm

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Not saying I'm owed anything, just want to be treated equal. Maybe you have never experienced discrimination first hand for having an illness, but it does exist and it isn't right and I am not the type of person that will sit down and shut up about it.

So the place didn't have potato chips?  Peanuts?  Whole fruit?  Soda?  Water?  Orange juice?

 

It's discrimination when you are denied something available to others, not when you're denied what you want.

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Maybe if you had long undiagnosed celiac and it created OTHER health conditions, illnesses and diseases causing permanent damage, you MIGHT be able to prove a disability under the disabiilites act. Good luck with that.

I think you just have an ax to grind at this point.

 

Good luck.

 

"Evaluating Your Residual Functional Capacity

If your symptoms of celiac disease are not severe enough to equal one of the disability listings above, then the next step is for the SSA to determine your residual functional capacity (RFC). Your RFC describes the most amount of work that you can perform, and is labeled as sedentary, light, medium, or heavy work. To determine your RFC, the SSA will evaluate your ability to perform work tasks such as sitting, standing, walking, interacting with coworkers and supervisors, and following simple instructions.

If you can't perform at least sedentary work (for instance, an inability to sit for six hours per day and stand/walk for two hours per day), you should be found disabled.

If you are over age 50, you could be found disabled even if you can perform sedentary or light work, if your education and prior job skills didn't prepare you to do sedentary or light work. 

It would be helpful for your doctor to write out an opinion stating any limitations that you have as a result of your celiac disease. If you need to take frequent rest room breaks throughout the day, your RFC should include that limitation. In addition, if you suffer from any type of abdominal pain that could affect your ability to concentrate on tasks, this should be in your RFC. If you are unable to work on a regular basis, or you would miss several days of work per month as a result of your disorder, then this should be in your RFC, and the SSA could find you disabled."

 

http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/resources/social-security-disability-coverage/benefits-celiac-disease.htm

celiac is considered an "invisible disability" by the ADA

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Its another case of us being discriminated against. Why are you telling me not to stand up for celiacs?

 

that article is a joke and I do not consider it valid or relevant.

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It's discrimination when you are denied something available to others, not when you're denied what you want.

 

and on that intelligent note, (and thank you, Jess :) )...I'm out... . I tried my best. 

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The point of this topic was to point out that discrimination exists towards celiacs and that it is our duty to stand up and protect other celiacs from this type of thing. The whole stadium thing was just one incident to which I felt personally discriminated against. You can agree with me or disagree whether or not that was so, however you can't deny that many people have view us with certain stereotypes which I believe is expressed in cases such as that disney channel portrayal of a child with celiac disease.

 

I am just calling on all of you to confront this type of behavior whenever we encounter it, and to support your fellow celiac in these cases.

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In our case I think its discrimination. Under the Americans with disabilities act.

 

http://newsok.com/oklahoma-mother-says-muskogee-pizza-hut-discriminated-against-son/article/3627995

i bet if she brought a sandwich from home, and spoken with the manager on arrival, she would not have had a problem.  allowing another brand is probably against their company policy - and whomever allowed it to happen in that store would have worried about losing their job.   who knows...  

 

once i did get stuck at the airport with just a turkey samwich to last me a day and a half - got a turkey samwich through security, got pretty much anything i ever tried to get through security, food-wise, (they make you get rid of your open drinks, though, but you can get juice, water, etc once you get inside) i even got stuff through that i forgot i had and was surprised they let me by :)  

 

maybe it's the winking :rolleyes:  ;););) cheaper than a lawsuit!! 

 

side note:  ick, mcdonalds burger lolz 

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The point of this topic was to point out that discrimination exists towards celiacs and that it is our duty to stand up and protect other celiacs from this type of thing. The whole stadium thing was just one incident to which I felt personally discriminated against. You can agree with me or disagree whether or not that was so, however you can't deny that many people have view us with certain stereotypes which I believe is expressed in cases such as that disney channel portrayal of a child with celiac disease.

 

I am just calling on all of you to confront this type of behavior whenever we encounter it, and to support your fellow celiac in these cases.

absolutely!  and this ^ disney topic has already been heartily discussed (i even think there was a petition involved)  and from what i understand, disney has pulled this episode as a result.  

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Makes me wonder about Celiacs who are homeless. What about soup kitchens. God what a horrible situation. I'm sure there are some out there now that are forced to just gluten themselves.

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