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Discrimination

discrimination eating out

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#16 kareng

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 05:39 PM

It's ok, I'll just be going to more giants games. They have gluten free beer there and then I dont have to go to Oakland. It's a win win situation.


Exactly! If they don't have the products you want.....don't give them your money!
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#17 grodeylocks

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 05:46 PM

I know you are angry but we do not have a right to food at a baseball game. If the stadium decided not to sell food to anyone, that would not be a violations of everyone who wanted to buy overpriced food's rights. If the stadium decided to only sell snack items like chips and candy, is that a violation of the rights of someone who would like a steak? If someone wants lobster and they don't sell it, how is that a violation of rights.

I am not going to continue a pointless argument with you. Sometimes life isn't fair or fun.

Not have a right to food at a baseball game? If that's the case then we shouldn't have the right to have water or bathrooms for that matter either. Why are they forced to have to provide that to everyone then?


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#18 notme!

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 05:54 PM

Not have a right to food at a baseball game? If that's the case then we shouldn't have the right to have water or bathrooms for that matter either. Why are they forced to have to provide that to everyone then?

i suppose they don't want people peeing everywhere  ;)  so, that is probably to their advantage.   and, really, they *don't* have to accomodate you.  or anyone, for that matter.  they sell food there to make money.  


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#19 StephanieL

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:04 PM

Not have a right to food at a baseball game? If that's the case then we shouldn't have the right to have water or bathrooms for that matter either. Why are they forced to have to provide that to everyone then?

 

They aren't saying you can't come to the game because you have Celiac. The food may be part of the "experience" but the experience isn't what your ticket price covers.

 

Just like at the movies. You can't bring stuff in. Period. The price of the ticket is for the movie.

 

We have a list much longer than just gluten. We eat before or after or call well in advance to find out if we can bring our own. If my kid has an issue with not eating AT the thing, we don't go. Obviously for travel that is a different story but again, planning, planning, planning.


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#20 Fire Fairy

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:12 PM

Hugs Grodeylocks. I understand how you feel. Who knows you could win a law suit but it honestly isn't a right. They should want to make you happy in order to get your money but short of that they have no other reason, if they know you will still go to games and you wont be spending money on consessions anyway they really have nothing to lose by not accommodateing you. Now to play devil's advocate if you could start a protest and cause a lot of folks not to go to their games then you might could get something done. That mind you would be very difficult and very extreme, but it would be cheaper than a lawsuit.


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If you over-salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: 'I made it, you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!'-unknown

#21 grodeylocks

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 10:34 PM

I'm not saying they have to provide us with food at all or gluten free food at all. However, if I want to bring in my own food and take care of myself who's rights am I violating by doing that. Nobody. That's where my problem lies. Imagine a world in which every single restaurant adopted these policies and there wasn't any reliable gluten free food served. You guys honestly don't believe there is something wrong with that.


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#22 Fire Fairy

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 05:46 AM

I worked in restaurants as a hostess, and I can tell you waitstaff really don't like it if you bring your own food. That isn't what they get paid for, they feel you are taking away their money and it makes them resent you. If you've never worked in a restaurant you don't realize this but to the staff every seat has a dollar sign attached to it and your butt in that seat is a negative. And yes some staff will punish those you are with by doing bad things to their food! Like spitting in it or dropping it on the floor. I simply would not eat, it's safer because it's not quite the insult of bringing food in. That is like slapping the waiter and the cook in the face. (to their minds)

 

I've never brought my own food to a restaurant. I've seen the behavior behind the scenes when people did! 


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If you over-salt a dish while you are cooking, that's too bad. Please recite with me the real woman's motto: 'I made it, you will eat it and I don't care how bad it tastes!'-unknown

#23 Jestgar

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 06:30 AM

It's not discrimination if the rules apply to everyone.  If you were told you couldn't bring in your gluten-free food, but could bring in regular food, that would be discrimination. 

 

A restaurant is not required to serve you food, nor are they required to let you bring in your own food.  What if you had cockroaches or other bugs mixed in with your snacks and you contaminated their restaurant?  

 

A carnivore can't demand meat at a vegetarian restaurant, nor can a vegan demand vegetables at a salami shop. 

 

If what they serve doesn't suit you, don't go.


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#24 Asillem4

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 08:32 AM

I don't apologize anymore when I take my own food into a restaurant. However, the only reason my husband and I eat at restaurants that don't offer a safe, gluten free option on the menu is because someone invited us to join them. If it's up to us, we eat at the few places I know I won't get sick after enjoying a meal.

I do get some hassle in my family though. Mostly my father-in-law who doesn't understand any of this. I'll blame his diminishing ability to comprehend.

Just last night we were invited to join out of town family at a pizza restaurant. I didn't eat the salad bar because it was disgusting and most likely contaminated.

When we got home, I started fixing myself some dinner. My father-in-law walked into the kitchen and said, "AH-HA!"

I said, "What?"

"You're EATING!"

"I'm fixing myself some dinner." *It was 9:30*

"See! You should have eaten at the restaurant!"

"There wasn't anything there I could eat."

"You should have had a salad."

 

/facepalm


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Promethius Lab. panel shows Pos. genetic marker / Neg. antibody. Family doc, Gastro, and Allergist refuse to look down this path any further. I've gone gluten free without the diagnosis and am so much happier now.
Intollerances to: wheat, barley, rye
Allergies to: wheat, corn, soy, milk, peanut
Annoying to: anyone who wants to cook for me, go to a restaurant, or have a cold beer on a hot day with me

#25 Pegleg84

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 09:14 AM

I still can't believe they only let you through security at the airport with a bag of sunflower seeds. Now THAT is ridiculous. I always bring my own food on flights with me, regardless of whether they have gluten-free options or not (just in case). If it's domestic, I put something in a container for later. If it's international, I'll make sure either to eat any produce, etc, before going through customs, and bring pre-packaged stuff for the trip. Never had a problem.

 

As for stadiums/theatres/etc, you've already paid for a ticket to be there. If you can't eat anything sold there, then you don't spend any more money. I don't see why they wouldn't allow us to bring in our own food (as long as it wasn't excessive). Are they going to confiscate a larabar in your purse? While it might not be a right, I think it's good business sense to accommodate those who they don't/can't cater to. It's always worth asking at least. You're not going to buy anything anyway, so might as well not drive the ticket sale away as well.

 

So, kind of ridiculous. I'd still try to smuggle something in anyway.


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#26 grodeylocks

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:14 AM

I worked in restaurants as a hostess, and I can tell you waitstaff really don't like it if you bring your own food. That isn't what they get paid for, they feel you are taking away their money and it makes them resent you. If you've never worked in a restaurant you don't realize this but to the staff every seat has a dollar sign attached to it and your butt in that seat is a negative. And yes some staff will punish those you are with by doing bad things to their food! Like spitting in it or dropping it on the floor. I simply would not eat, it's safer because it's not quite the insult of bringing food in. That is like slapping the waiter and the cook in the face. (to their minds)

 

I've never brought my own food to a restaurant. I've seen the behavior behind the scenes when people did! 

Don't you think people should be educated about our problems to understand this. It's not right.


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#27 grodeylocks

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 11:18 AM

It's not discrimination if the rules apply to everyone.  If you were told you couldn't bring in your gluten-free food, but could bring in regular food, that would be discrimination. 

 

A restaurant is not required to serve you food, nor are they required to let you bring in your own food.  What if you had cockroaches or other bugs mixed in with your snacks and you contaminated their restaurant?  

 

A carnivore can't demand meat at a vegetarian restaurant, nor can a vegan demand vegetables at a salami shop. 

 

In our case I think its discrimination. Under the Americans with disabilities act.

 

http://newsok.com/ok...article/3627995


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#28 gatita

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 12:13 PM

From a legal point of view, this raises some interesting questions. There is no doubt there have recently been intriguing new ADA case rulings. The successful ADA lawsuit by a celiac student at Lesley University surprised a lot of us, and has led to changes in campus dining halls across the country.

 

But there is a difference. In the case of college, the student was charged for a year-round meal plan he couldn't eat, and the harm that food would cause him was clear.

 

Medically speaking, though, we don't need to eat anything during the few hours we're at a ball game. So I think the legal argument under ADA would be a tough fight, but doesn't mean it's impossible. (I notice that the mother in the article said she is not going to sue the restaurant.) Then again, I've seen restaurants closed in our town because the owner didn't make them wheelchair accessible... it's taken the legal community awhile to accept the notion of celiac disease as a disability, but the Lesly lawsuit opened that door.

 

I'm just just talking the legal aspects here, not the ethical/moral arguments.

 

 

ps. And no, I'm not a lawyer, just a reporter who's covered a lot of court trial and civil lawsuits.


Edited by gatita, 10 June 2013 - 12:16 PM.

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#29 IrishHeart

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 12:40 PM

 

Frankly, your rights aren't being violated by being forced not to eat for the length of a baseball game.

 

Exactly!!!.

 

Not have a right to food at a baseball game? If that's the case then we shouldn't have the right to have water or bathrooms for that matter either. Why are they forced to have to provide that to everyone then?

That's a non sequitor. Your argument is not valid, sorry.

 

Gluten free food is not a necessity of life for the majority of people attending a ball game.

Bathrooms, however, are a different story.

 

I brought my own sandwich into the ball parks in Florida recently. But I have also managed to watch many games, movies, plays etc without filing my face. They just do not allow liquids to be brought inside.But, this is true ANYWHERE now: theaters, planes, etc.

 

The Americans with Disabilities Act does apply to celiacs attending college, for example--that they be provided with gluten free meals.

That's because they paid for it in advance---and because constantly eating food that was not G F would have been dangerous.

 

But no one is legally required to provide G F food for us at a ball game or a restaurant or in an airport, so you may as well get over it

now or you're going to be angry for the rest of your life and suing people left and right. And it costs a TON of money to bring about a lawsuit, so be prepared to rack up a lot of bills. :)  

 

 

I still can't believe they only let you through security at the airport with a bag of sunflower seeds. 

 

me neither.

 

 

Medically speaking, though, we don't need to eat anything during the few hours we're at a ball game. So I think the legal argument under ADA would be a tough fight, 

and a lost cause.


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#30 Jestgar

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 02:13 PM

In our case I think its discrimination. Under the Americans with disabilities act.

 

http://newsok.com/ok...article/3627995

Only if you're required to be somewhere, or required to eat somewhere. 

 

If you have to go to a business meeting at a restaurant, your boss (not the restaurant) is required to provide you with safe food.

 

If you choose to go to a restaurant, you're on your own.  In the piece above, the kid did not have to eat there, did not even have to be there, and she brought in food from another restaurant that also has potential for cc.  I say no case.


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