Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Is Wine gluten-free?


  • Please log in to reply

37 replies to this topic

#16 kareng

 
kareng

    Gobble! Gobble!

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,240 posts
 

Posted 29 June 2013 - 08:45 PM

Some think many wines have gluten; if so, please note each batch of wine may vary in ppm. You can contact the manufacturer, or run your own elisa test. http://www.drvino.co...uten-free-wine/This standard of 20 ppm of gluten as not showing symptoms of damage: is there really a safe limit, now that we know of the extent of neurologic and other "hidden" or "slowly accreting" health problems? Has anyone actually experimented with a product certified 20 ppm, and if so, what happened? 100 ppm?Hmmm...you know, if you folks who drink wine got together, you could do your own label of gluten free wine, called "celiac.com's finest".



Once again...your " proof" contradicts you. Your article says " But the chances are pretty slim that any wines actually contain gluten. "

I really don't understand you odd comment about 20 ppm. Just because a product is tested using the test " less than 20 ppm" , that does not mean it has 20 ppm or 19 or 6. It could have 0. Many of the certified gluten-free products are certified at 20, some at 10. Once again, that does not mean they are saying it has 20 ppm. They tested for less than 20 ppm.


  • 0

Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 


Celiac.com Sponsor:

#17 w8in4dave

 
w8in4dave

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,256 posts
 

Posted 02 July 2013 - 08:38 AM

I am not much of a drinker, sometimes a beer would do me good! But since I have been DX'd, I have had a few glasses of wine. I cannot tolerate the high alcohol levels of some wines!! I didn't even know wine had a high level of alcohol in it!! So now I look at high alcohol levels and if my friends or family offer me wine I look to see alcohol level and I either will put in in a tall galss filled with ice or I mix it with pop or sparkling water or something. Sparkling water is good if it doesn't have artificial sweetener in it (I am allergic to it) Who knew? It tasted good with wine .... So I rarely have a drink of wine either , sometimes it's just not worth the fuss!! In fact someone mentioned wine spritzers , thats what gave me the idea... They are good if you find the right mix!! :) 


  • 0

Recovering Gluten Eater 

DX'd June 17th 2013


#18 dilettantesteph

 
dilettantesteph

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,035 posts
 

Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:40 AM

Some think many wines have gluten; if so, please note each batch of wine may vary in ppm. You can contact the manufacturer, or run your own elisa test. http://www.drvino.co...uten-free-wine/

This standard of 20 ppm of gluten as not showing symptoms of damage: is there really a safe limit, now that we know of the extent of neurologic and other "hidden" or "slowly accreting" health problems? Has anyone actually experimented with a product certified 20 ppm, and if so, what happened? 100 ppm?

Hmmm...you know, if you folks who drink wine got together, you could do your own label of gluten free wine, called "celiac.com's finest".

 

It is thought that a gluten reaction comes from a certain amount of daily intake and not a certain concentration.  There have been studies done on this.  This is an FDA review of the studies which is long: http://www.fda.gov/d...h/UCM264152.pdf

 

 

This is the most often cited one from which the 20 ppm safe limit came. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/17209192

 

You will see that sensitivity levels vary and while 20 ppm is considered safe for most celiacs, it is not for all.  Some with ongoing symptoms require a gluten contamination free diet: http://www.biomedcen...1471-230X/13/40

 

This doesn't have so much to do with the wine gluten-free issue, I'm addressing the question in that previous post.  You can note that alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the gluten contamination free diet.


  • 0

#19 GottaSki

 
GottaSki

    "The past is the past...I've got places to be."

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,100 posts
 

Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:37 AM

This doesn't have so much to do with the wine gluten-free issue, I'm addressing the question in that previous post.  You can note that alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the gluten contamination free diet.

 

I have a very limited whole food diet and safely consume Red Wine often.  My intestines are finally healing according to my repeat biopsies -- there is no gluten in the wine I am drinking -- If I were offered a fine very old vintage -- I might question what it was contained in originally, but newer/mass produced wines are not held in containers with or strained through any gluten.


  • 1

-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#20 kareng

 
kareng

    Gobble! Gobble!

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,240 posts
 

Posted 03 July 2013 - 05:51 AM

 

.  You can note that alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the gluten contamination free diet.

 

 

Not surprising that alcohol is not allowed in a restrictive diet meant to help people heal from an ailment.  That is just normal for many of those type of diets.


Edited by kareng, 03 July 2013 - 08:55 AM.

  • 0

Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 


#21 Gemini

 
Gemini

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,154 posts
 

Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:45 AM

The study which cites the 20 ppm issue makes no sense because many of the people in the study were able to resume a normal gluten-free diet with no recurrance of symptoms.  Most people, when diagnosed, follow a pretty spartan, whole foods diet and go on to add many more foods back in as they recover.  After 8 years gluten-free, I am amazed at how many more foods I can tolerate well and I am extremely sensitive to small amounts also but don't label myself with the super sensitive label.  There has been no proof that any of these questionable foods (processed) have any trace amount of gluten in them because of current testing methods. So making that assumption is a leap. 

 

If you go through life fearing that all the food out there is contaminated, that mindset in itself could interfere with your ability to heal well and will make for a pretty spartan food experience.

Celiacs often have so many other issues and couple that with long healing times for many of us, can go a long way to making people feel nothing is safe to eat.  That's when you need to rely on established organizations that will publish safe and non-safe food lists.  Wine has never been listed on any unsafe food list that I have seen in 8 years. Wine is routinely consumed by the vast majority of Celiacs with no problem.  However, as wine can be an irritant to the stomach because of it's alcohol content, there will be those who just cannot tolerate it in the beginning or never. That does not mean there is gluten in the wine.


  • 1

#22 w8in4dave

 
w8in4dave

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,256 posts
 

Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:05 PM

I agree with Gemini really sounds so true!! Ilike the last paragraph!! :) 


  • 0

Recovering Gluten Eater 

DX'd June 17th 2013


#23 dilettantesteph

 
dilettantesteph

    Advanced Community Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,035 posts
 

Posted 04 July 2013 - 05:33 AM

Not surprising that alcohol is not allowed in a restrictive diet meant to help people heal from an ailment.  That is just normal for many of those type of diets.

 

I agree.  Alcohol consumption is not the best thing when you are sick.  Thank you for being more clear.


  • 0

#24 cap6

 
cap6

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 676 posts
 

Posted 04 July 2013 - 04:36 PM

Taken from the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity winter 2013 issue:

 

Wine that is aged in oak

barrels contains less gluten than we

are currently capable of testing for,

whether hydrolyzed or not.

At this point, a lot of people will

begin to shake their heads: “If wine

is gluten-free, then why do I get sick

when I drink __________ wine?” The

likely answer is that you are reacting

to something else! Many winemakers

use egg whites as a clarifying agent.

The amount of egg used is far more

substantial than any wheat paste that

might have leaked into the wine, so if

you know eggs are a problem, this is

likely what you are reacting to.

 

 

Wine is safe.  If you are drinking coolers check the ingredients!


  • 1

#25 Lisa

 
Lisa

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,799 posts
 

Posted 04 July 2013 - 06:47 PM

Taken from the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity winter 2013 issue:

 

Wine that is aged in oak

barrels contains less gluten than we

are currently capable of testing for,

whether hydrolyzed or not.

At this point, a lot of people will

begin to shake their heads: “If wine

is gluten-free, then why do I get sick

when I drink __________ wine?” The

likely answer is that you are reacting

to something else! Many winemakers

use egg whites as a clarifying agent.

The amount of egg used is far more

substantial than any wheat paste that

might have leaked into the wine, so if

you know eggs are a problem, this is

likely what you are reacting to.

 

 

Wine is safe.  If you are drinking coolers check the ingredients!

 

Thank you for sharing this. :)  This is a recurring question/concern.  C :) heers!


  • 0
Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

#26 JordanBattenSymons

 
JordanBattenSymons

    New Community Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
 

Posted 19 August 2013 - 02:21 PM

Thank you all for your help and I do a lot of research on this site but it is helpful when you really get to talk to people who are going through what you are so thanks!

And Gemini I will check out the testing part also!

Thank god I cannot live without wine


  • 0

Jordan Batten-Symons


#27 AlwaysLearning

 
AlwaysLearning

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 192 posts
 

Posted 19 August 2013 - 08:17 PM

On another note, the anti-fluoride folks point out that most grapes are treated with pesticides that are high in fluoride which will persist through the wine-making process.

I've had fluoride poisoning and can't tolerate it at all now. There is just way too much of this toxic, carcinogenic substance in everything these days.

Organic wines could reduce those risks.


  • 0

#28 kareng

 
kareng

    Gobble! Gobble!

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,240 posts
 

Posted 20 August 2013 - 04:53 AM

On another note, the anti-fluoride folks point out that most grapes are treated with pesticides that are high in fluoride which will persist through the wine-making process.
I've had fluoride poisoning and can't tolerate it at all now. There is just way too much of this toxic, carcinogenic substance in everything these days.
Organic wines could reduce those risks.


this isn't an anti ( insert your agenda here) forum, so I'm not going to insist you back this claim up with scientific evidence. We dont need this topic to go off on odd tangents.

We were discussing gluten and wine. Lets keep the discussion to that, please.
  • 0

Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 


#29 AlwaysLearning

 
AlwaysLearning

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 192 posts
 

Posted 20 August 2013 - 05:23 AM

The fluoride content is extremely relevant considering that this is a conversation about why a person might experience a reaction to wine.

Here is a link to an entire article that goes into all of the details about the fluoride levels of grapes being beyond those allowed with links to the scientific studies.

http://www.naturalne...des_grapes.html

Here is a link that explains what fluoride toxicity is - from the National Institutes of health.

http://www.nlm.nih.g...icle/002650.htm

And I personally see this as being considerably relevant to those who have celiac considering the effect that malabsorption has on bones.


  • 0

#30 kareng

 
kareng

    Gobble! Gobble!

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,240 posts
 

Posted 20 August 2013 - 05:29 AM

The fluoride content is extremely relevant considering that this is a conversation about why a person might experience a reaction to wine.

Here is a link to an entire article that goes into all of the details about the fluoride levels of grapes being beyond those allowed with links to the scientific studies.

http://www.naturalne...des_grapes.html

Here is a link that explains what fluoride toxicity is - from the National Institutes of health.

http://www.nlm.nih.g...icle/002650.htm

And I personally see this as being considerably relevant to those who have celiac considering the effect that malabsorption has on bones.

 

 

The first link is not a reliable scientific source.  The second link pertains to fluoride poisoning as an immediate event - a child eating the whole tube of toothpaste for example.  It mentions that low levels will not "poison" you.

 

Once again, I would caution that this is a Celiac forum and other agendas are not appropriate here or pertain to the topic "Is Wine Gluten Free"


Edited by kareng, 20 August 2013 - 05:37 AM.

  • 0

Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: