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Mental Health?
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Not sure about the peppermint tea for kids, but it's good for adults. Ibuprofen or Tylenol are safe choices for most kids. I'd try Tylenol first.

She loves both peppermint tea and camomile tea. I really didn't realize that Pepto had aspirin in it! We have generally avoided pain killers except for children's Tylenol.

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I had to go looking about Pepto having aspirin in it. Never heard that it did before! So here is what I found on their own website:

The cause of Reye's syndrome is still not understood despite a tremendous amount of research. However, the Health Canada warning for aspirin and non-aspirin-containing products states, "Children and teenagers should not use this medicine for chicken pox or flu symptoms before a doctor is consulted about Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious illness reported to be associated with aspirin." There is no aspirin in Pepto-Bismol. The active ingredient in Pepto-Bismol is bismuth subsalicylate, a non-aspirin salicylate. Salicylates are commonly used as flavouring agents in food (wintergreen). The United States Food & Drug Administration's OTC Final Anti-Diarrheal Monograph states that there is no definitive evidence that associates use of non-aspirin salicylates with an increased risk of Reye's syndrome.

P&G has voluntarily included a Reye's syndrome label warning since 1985. P&G includes this label warning to encourage consumers and parents to consult a doctor for children and teenagers who have or are recovering from the flu or chicken pox, if nausea or vomiting occurs. These symptoms can be an early sign of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious illness. Those suffering from Reye's syndrome should contact a doctor as soon as possible.

 

I wanted to post that information because I've used Pepto  myself when I was a kid and I've used it with my own kids. Never once has a doctor said anything about it to me either. Interesting things you learn every day!

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The main ingredient is not asprin. Rather, the main ingredient is chemically similar to it.

 

On another side note, those who are allergic to NSAIDS should not take the product because of this.

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Oh...I wasn't disagreeing...just posting the info I found because it was news to me. I've used Pepto with 2 of my kids (who are 18 and 15) before with the doctor's knowledge/go ahead...when they were much younger. I wasn't being argumentative....I just hadn't ever been educated on that aspect of Pepto before. Good knowledge to have and now I know not to give it to my little guy.

I know I was always given Pepto as a kid...I know because usually within half an hour of getting Pepto...I'd puke. Every.Time.
 

Now I'll stick to sucking on peppermints or drinking the tea (though I usually only drink the tea when I have a cold).

I find it interesting to learn new things about products that have been around forever. It was always around when I was a kid and it never crossed my mind to question if it was ok to give to my kids. Never would have thought about the aspirin aspect at all.

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I was given a lot of Pepto as a kid too.  I was also given aspirin.  I had a lot of tummy aches.  I don't know when they found out about the connection with Reyes Syndrome. 

 

More information: http://www.reyessyndrome.org/aspirin.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17147458

 

In the British Isles there were warnings against the use of aspirin in children in 1989.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1511546/

 

According to Wikipedia, the CDC starting warning about it in 1980.  I first heard about it in 1972.  The  friend who told me's father was an MD.  He must have heard about it while it was just starting to be suspected as a cause.

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See, the aspirin thing I knew about...that's pretty much drilled into young parents' heads now. I was given aspirin as a kid too. :) All ground up and sprinkled on applesauce. Blech.

Anyway....sorry to hijack the thread LFITTS! I hope you guys can figure things out with your daughter. I know being rural can make things so much more difficult. Heck, I'm not rural (though we aren't considered a big city either) but we still have a shortage of decent psych doctors around here.

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Anyway....sorry to hijack the thread LFITTS! I hope you guys can figure things out with your daughter. I know being rural can make things so much more difficult. Heck, I'm not rural (though we aren't considered a big city either) but we still have a shortage of decent psych doctors around here.

 

No worries! It's not hijacked - it's shared information!

 

It's been a long week in which my sweet daughter refused two parties, quit gymnastics, worked incessantly in the garden and swam like a fish with her sisters. I didn't fuss, didn't push her to break away from the family. I'm feeling that she needs time at home to be nurtured. My biggest fear is that, when summer ends, she will be so withdrawn that it will be impossible to get her to school. Anyway, we have started a back and forth journal (sort of -- I wrote and now I'm waiting), gotten the names of a couple of recommended doctors, restarted vitamins, and eaten almost exclusively preservative-free real minimally processed foods. Onward and upward.

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Nothing wrong with being family centered for a while.  Perhaps a friend can come over and be a part of the family for a day - so she's not totally inward centered, but she's still in her comfort zone?  Heck, even playing with the family requires a lot of outward facing attention, so I wouldn't worry too much.

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No worries! It's not hijacked - it's shared information!

 

It's been a long week in which my sweet daughter refused two parties, quit gymnastics, worked incessantly in the garden and swam like a fish with her sisters. I didn't fuss, didn't push her to break away from the family. I'm feeling that she needs time at home to be nurtured. My biggest fear is that, when summer ends, she will be so withdrawn that it will be impossible to get her to school. Anyway, we have started a back and forth journal (sort of -- I wrote and now I'm waiting), gotten the names of a couple of recommended doctors, restarted vitamins, and eaten almost exclusively preservative-free real minimally processed foods. Onward and upward.

Random thought, could someone be bullying her?

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Before this withdrawl....did she have a lot of friends that she was always with or just one or two friends that she was always with? People person type of kid or normal not so much but still enjoys some of the group activities.

I ask because my oldest son *15 yr old* started out as a people person when he was very, very young but by school age he was pretty much down to 1 or 2 friends that he had. He has ADHD and ODD (oppositional defiance disorder) and he can act very immature....most of the time. He likes to read. He reads all the time. He used to be in soccer until he hit a crazy growth spurt and I tied it to how his grades were. Now any time he plays...everything on him hurts. I think he needs to finish growing into his body.

I agree with shadowicewolf...could she be being bullied? We've dealt with the bullies with the 15 year old...it got so bad I took him out of school and home schooled him for half of his 8th grade year. :( He is one of those kids that simply takes everything very literally. EVERYTHING. I also don't think he has the ability to really understand sarcasm. Or when kids are just joking with him. There have been several (and by several...I mean hundreds) of times just between myself and him or his siblings and him...where we said one thing and his brain twisted it so completely it didn't even match what it was we said. Wish I knew how that worked and how to turn it off! The last year and a half have definitely seen some improvement. The half a school year he was out...the main kids that bullied him ended up getting expelled from school for drugs. I'm glad....I couldn't figure out what to do with my 14 year old coming home crying or so angry he was exploding on everyone to the point of violence. :(

Anyway....just taking the others' thoughts a little further. Bullying messes with everything. And it's hard to get it to stop. And some kids are just more homebody types. Don't want or need a lot of friends or outside stimulation. Working in the garden can be very therapeutic by itself. I know I always feel better after messing in the dirt. :) Good luck figuring it all out and please keep us posted. Sometimes it helps to have someone other than mom looking at things.

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I have been gluten free for about a year.  I struggled hard with many physical issues through this year.  Mentally, I feel like I am struggling more and more.  I wish I had my Mommy to take care of me.  I don't want to make even easy decisions like what should we do next.   It is a time when I am mostly with family.  I don't think it is permanent or even all that concerning.  I am pushing myself a little to go outside of the comfort zone, but am careful it will be profitable first.

 

  It is very hard to attend food events.  Remember the old saying not to eat in front of people, there is some good reasons for it.  Eating the same food together helps the bond between people to grow.  Not being able to eat the food others are eating causes separation to some degree.  I have been glutened while eating in other peoples kitchens and while drinking water while others had desserts.  There is always the possibility there is a physical cause for the distress.

 

I homeschool and really like it.  The children are fairing well, even when they get beyond high school.  I think it may be something to consider in such as spot.

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LFitts,

I start by honestly saying I am not a Mom myself, as much as I wanted to be one, but I have worked with kids of various ages for many

many years.

 

I wish to reinforce that she is adjusting emotionally to being on a G F diet  This may take some time..

 

This alone causes some adults to have feelings of insecurity and some people have some over-the-top fears about being sociable.  

Maybe this is part of it?.

 

May I make a few suggestions?

 

-- seek the help of a pediatric doc and see if she can see a counselor who deals with kids who have to be on  special diets. (allergies, diabetes, etc. They are trained to handle this kind of thing. You do not have to call her a counselor, if that seems intimidating.... call her a nutritionist

 

--the most quiet kids I had in class where the most "deep".--thoughtful and intelligent.They did not have any mental health issues, but self-esteem issues. They may not have talked much in class (and I never, ever made any of them do it) but they would write volumes in a journal to me.  I had the kids keep journals and I answered every one of those entries.

I think Bartful's suggestion of expressing herself in her writing is an excellent idea. She may just reveal more to you this way and give you insight into what she is thinking.

 

--she is healthy, playing with her siblings and at least, enjoying her time with family. I think that's great.!! if she were secluding herself in her room or morose and despondent, well, that would be more alarming. (IMHO)

 

---can you invite some of her friends to your house so she can see that socializing is still fun? They could make a healthy lunch together, then maybe some gluten-free cupcakes , that sort of thing? If she eats with the other kids and feels comfortable, maybe that will help the transition back into a larger circle.

 

Homeschooling has some value, yes, but I will not argue the merits of it with anyone (because that is not the topic) and any students who were home-schooled and then, returned to the public high schools and colleges I taught in ---ALWAYS had the worst cases of difficulty socializing that  I have ever seen. They also felt I was supposed to pay sole attention to them in the classroom, which made it tricky when teaching a lecture hall full of college students. One friend successfully home-schooled her wee ones for a few years, but made sure they enjoyed Boy Scouts, 4H, choir, etc. and anything the small town she lives in offered for kids.  Their transition to high school was a piece of cake as a result.

 

To do it just to accommodate a budding fear of going out into the world, would be a huge mistake.

IMHO 

 

My best wishes to you and your daughter.

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Random thought, could someone be bullying her?

 

She ACTS like a bullied child, but she's not! She usually wants me to stay and watch her activities, and the other kids really like her. She has spurned their invitations and to my perspective been rude to other kids, and then tells me that they don't like her. What is this way of thinking?? She is very sensitive and very competitive and genuinely gets her feelings hurt if she's not the fastest, strongest, and best at everything. I'm wondering of part of quitting is because she's not the best? Much to think about and observe. I'm holding off on taking further steps until we see the ped gi.

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She ACTS like a bullied child, but she's not! She usually wants me to stay and watch her activities, and the other kids really like her. She has spurned their invitations and to my perspective been rude to other kids, and then tells me that they don't like her. What is this way of thinking?? She is very sensitive and very competitive and genuinely gets her feelings hurt if she's not the fastest, strongest, and best at everything. I'm wondering of part of quitting is because she's not the best? Much to think about and observe. I'm holding off on taking further steps until we see the ped gi.

When my step-daughter was her age that's exactly the way she was - if she didn't win every game or prove to be the best at anything she tried she would cry or pout or refuse to play. It was a phase. She outgrew it and turned out to be a lovely human being. :wub:

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She ACTS like a bullied child, but she's not! She usually wants me to stay and watch her activities, and the other kids really like her. She has spurned their invitations and to my perspective been rude to other kids, and then tells me that they don't like her. What is this way of thinking?? She is very sensitive and very competitive and genuinely gets her feelings hurt if she's not the fastest, strongest, and best at everything. I'm wondering of part of quitting is because she's not the best? Much to think about and observe. I'm holding off on taking further steps until we see the ped gi.

My oldest daughter was that way too with having to be the best. After she started coming out of her shyness shell after a lot of coaxing throughout kindergarten...that is how she was too. If it was something she excelled at...strings, soccer, band...she kept at it, no problem. Girl can pick up an instrument and play it no problem but we tried to do a baseball camp when she was little. Something the high school put on (and still puts on but they've added football! Little guy did this camp and loved it!). Had both her and my middle son in it. The very first ball she didn't catch it. The.very.first.ball. Guess who sat in a corner and cried? Guess who wouldn't have anything to do with baseball ever again? Couldn't really get her to play catch either...until the youngest came along and wants everyone to play catch with him all the time!

She never played any other sport besides soccer. EVER. Well...in gym class because she wasn't going to fail at that just because she didn't participate....but in general or for fun? Nope. Couldn't get her to try tennis or anything else that was offered through the Parks/Rec department. She is, finally, a little more open to it and more ok with the possibility of failure now at the age of 18. So, I will agree it is a stage and depending on your child's personality....it can be a long stage. Though, quitting something they're good at isn't quite a typical thing either. Though, I've noticed it's something my daughter does when she is overwhelmed. Quits everything and hibernates. (Though by quits...it's more of a give minimal attention to) Solo Ensemble always meant that for at least a week we wouldn't see her and when we did she was one cranky girl. She just did all her college entrance exams and her finals for her high school classes and was working. I think I saw her for about 10 minutes that week and that was a barely verbal exchange with a lot of glowering. Pretty sure it was her time of the month too, so that didn't help! :) She emerged when she was all done and apologized in her own way. I understand why she does this as I do things similarly....though I usually just lose myself in a book or 3. My husband, however, does not.

Now...all that and she didn't have any special diet or circumstance or anything like that that added to it. I can see her having been much more withdrawn when she was younger if she had. Though...she definitely would have been more outspoken as she got older and she would have definitely been an educator of those that had no idea. :)

Good luck....it sure would be nice if they would come with a nice handbook, wouldn't it?

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because we lear  by watching to a higher degree ....ca  you role play the acceptace  of beig other tha the best? please e+cuse the typig   seferal of the botto keys are't working....lol auto correct worked for a few...

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I'll tell you what I remember working with my kids when they were clingy.  I smothered them with attention.  Then they got reassured and felt independent again.  I found that if I tried to push them away before they were ready, it backfired.  

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Good luck....it sure would be nice if they would come with a nice handbook, wouldn't it?

Yes, it would!! :P

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My daughter sees a psychologist.  She has anxiety along with Autism.  The child psychologist is someone she can talk to about anything, it doesn't have to be bad stuff, she can talk about good things or anything she wants to talk about.  It's someone she can be whoever she is when she's there, know what I mean?

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Okay, well, the visit with the doctor was okay, but I didn't feel like I could speak freely in front of my daughter, so now I'm waiting on a call back. The good, no GREAT news is that now at 6 months gluten free, all her serology results are back in the normal range!! Her TTG was ridiculously high in December, and now it's 3!! that's right, three! Whew, I'm glad all of this gluten-free living is working. I was so afraid of bad results.
 
I signed up for a webinar (I'll try to paste it below) on supporting kids living with chronic food allergies. I know it's not a food allergy, but I hope to glean something good from it. Meanwhile, we are researching child psychologists and trying to get recommendations in the region. We need to find somebody soon that we can start meeting with. At the very least, we need help with communication.
 
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  1x1.gifembed.jpg   Supporting Children, Adolescents, and Parents in the Daily Management of Food Allergies   button_joinWebinar.gif   Join us on Wednesday, Aug 14, 2013 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EDT   Dear Lacey,   Thank you for registering for:   Supporting Children, Adolescents, and Parents in the Daily Management of Food Allergies
Wednesday, Aug 14, 2013 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EDT   1.  Click here to join:   https://www2.gotomeeting.com/join/159466530/106698690     This link should not be shared with others; it is unique to you.   2.  You will be connected to audio using your computer's microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended.     Or, you may select Use Telephone after joining the Webinar.     Toll: +1 (702) 489-0003         Access Code: 943-887-085     Audio PIN: Shown after joining the Webinar       Webinar ID: 159-466-530   Please send your questions, comments and feedback to: mspigler@foodallergy.org

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Glad her numbers are doing better! :)

I hate...hate...HATE talking about my kids like they aren't sitting right next to me! I wish there was a way they could make it so you could meet with the doctor, express your concerns one on one and then bring the child in to have them join in the conversation (age appropriate of course) but of course that would just make things cost even more. Helps to have an older child along with sometimes....but only sometimes. *sigh* I feel ya there.

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