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Processed Gluten Free
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My problem is this: I have just been diagnosed with Celiac, I don't want to start eating a bunch of processed Gluten free food. I have been doing pretty good just eating Gluten free w/o all the processed!! I am now thinking I am eating to many potatoes, but at least they are not processed. So when it comes to Noodles maby I will just take it lightly... Maby once in a while... Before I tested positive , They told me I was negative for Celiac. So I just went on a "No processed food" diet. Now I am Celiac. Do I jump on the  Gluten Free Processed food or not? I am thinking not. My feelings are, I think I want it all to be more natural food. Fresh veggies and fruits and stuff. Yes maby once in a while have some Gluten free crackers or something but as for now. I think I wall stay processed free. 
What is your thoughts on this? I am just curious thanks :) 
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I think noodles are OK.  The Tinkyada ones are just rice and water. 

 

Really...all food we buy is "processed" in some way.  The point of the "no processed food" diet is to eat foods without all the "extras".  There are some very good "processed" foods you can use sometimes.  Its very hard to travel without a few things like Lara bars or Go Picnics.  It can be done, but its just easier.

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I always keep a Lara bar in my purse. I never know if I might run into an issue somewhere and I don't want to be stuck without something to eat. True that everything is processed in one way or another. Totally up to you though in terms of what you deem 'processed.'

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I guess when I say processed I mean in a box or bag like, chips, crackers, cookies, noodles, un processed (to me anyway) would be meat, fresh veggies, potatoes rice. fresh fruit. 

I understand buying in a store, just about everything is processed in a way , but you get the gist! 

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My problem is this: I have just been diagnosed with Celiac, I don't want to start eating a bunch of processed Gluten free food. I have been doing pretty good just eating Gluten free w/o all the processed!! I am now thinking I am eating to many potatoes, but at least they are not processed. So when it comes to Noodles maby I will just take it lightly... Maby once in a while... Before I tested positive , They told me I was negative for Celiac. So I just went on a "No processed food" diet. Now I am Celiac. Do I jump on the  Gluten Free Processed food or not? I am thinking not. My feelings are, I think I want it all to be more natural food. Fresh veggies and fruits and stuff. Yes maby once in a while have some Gluten free crackers or something but as for now. I think I wall stay processed free. 
What is your thoughts on this? I am just curious thanks :)

 

 

I'm a big "unprocessed foodie".  I made my own marshmallows two days ago, because I can't bring myself to buy the chemicals that are put together into commercial marshmallows and why I regularly make my own granola.  I do some things - gluten-free tamari, gluten-free Tinkyada noodles, almond milk, salad dressing (for my husband, who doesn't like my homemade variations), rice cakes, and Udi's bagels (the convenience factor here is too great, though I do make my own bread too).

 

I think you have to find your balance point.  As you can see, mine is pretty far towards unprocessed, but I won't say "absolutely no" to some treats here and there.  But, I also figure, if I can't deal with learning to make my own, maybe I shouldn't have it.  You know?

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I'm a big "unprocessed foodie".  I made my own marshmallows two days ago, because I can't bring myself to buy the chemicals that are put together into commercial marshmallows and why I regularly make my own granola.  I do some things - gluten-free tamari, gluten-free Tinkyada noodles, almond milk, salad dressing (for my husband, who doesn't like my homemade variations), rice cakes, and Udi's bagels (the convenience factor here is too great, though I do make my own bread too).

 

I think you have to find your balance point.  As you can see, mine is pretty far towards unprocessed, but I won't say "absolutely no" to some treats here and there.  But, I also figure, if I can't deal with learning to make my own, maybe I shouldn't have it.  You know?

Well yea I do know how HARD it will be to NEVER eat anything out of a box or bag, or a piece of Gluten Free bread. But I was like you before I was Gluten free. I was making my own bread, making my own pizza dough, I can alot of stuff!! I pickle alot of stuff!! I dehydrate alot of stuff!! I very rarely bought a bag of chips. Of course I bought noodles once in a while, but we made alot of our own noodles. My husband coming from an old Polish family he was used to his 90 some y/o mom making home made stuff, and my mom Irish and italian was a wonderful cook so the more home made the better!! So when 1st going Gluten free you hear don't start using all those flours or you'll develop an allergy to them. So I am kinda at a loss. Do I buy all that gluten free boxed stuff or go for the make my own? I think I will just make my own. I have been just eating meat and potatoes and veggies or meat rice and veggies. I am wanting something new :)  

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!! So when 1st going Gluten free you hear don't start using all those flours or you'll develop an allergy to them. So I am kinda at a loss.

 

 

I have never heard that as a medical fact.  Use whatever gluten-free flours you want.  They would be in the "processed" foods.  Maybe you heard that from someone that wanted to sell you things?

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I have never heard that as a medical fact.  Use whatever gluten-free flours you want.  They would be in the "processed" foods.  Maybe you heard that from someone that wanted to sell you things?

Not some one who wanted to sell me things, I researched this Celiac alot after I found out I was Celiac. It was on another site! I will have to look it up. I don't remember where I heard it or read it from but I did read it. But I also know not everything you read is true. I know Flour is one of those processed foods haha but home made breads and noodles can be made with them. Better to make your own processed noodles than buying them imho ... 

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You can eat perfectly healthy and fine on a gluten-free diet with minimal processed foods.  I eat meat, eggs, dairy, veg/fruits, potatoes, and occasionally rice or pasta, but I have pretty much lost interest in bread and pasta.  Chex cereal, Nut Thins crackers, gluten-free pretzels sometimes, slices of homemade bread in the freezer (rarely used unless I need a sandwich for a travel lunch), some Tinkyada pasta for homemade mac and cheese - that's about it.  I make bread primarily for crumbs so I can make meatballs or bread chicken, otherwise I'm happy eating sandwich fillings without the bread.  Think about the Paleo or South Beach diet and you're on the right track for eating without much processed food.  It's doable, especially if you can cook.  

 

What you may have heard about developing allergies is probably somebody's misinterpretation of food allergies that you might not be aware you have until you cut wheat, rye, barley, and oats out of your diet and find that you still have reactions to foods you might not have had much in the past, like quinoa or soy.  

 

You can try making your own noodles, but I've done it and unless you're going to do it a lot and have all the equipment and ingredients, it's probably not worth the effort compared to buying an occasional box of brown rice pasta.  If, as you say, you have done it a lot in the past then for you it's probably not going to be as hard to make your own as it would be for most of us, but the dough will not have the same feel and behavior (like how it rolls out), so it will still take some practice.

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TY I will try and look up the things I have read about the allergy stuff .... :) 

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I guess I have a different view. Being Celiac is only a part of who I am, not WHO I AM. I actually have too much else going on to make pasta, noodles, etc. Store bought suits me fine. I am a good cook and I have learned to make just about everything we enjoyed before, but make it gluten free. Now it is just like it used to be... decide what to fix for a meal and throw it together. No long drawn out processes.

That may be a result of my whole attitude... this disease can't control me. I will control it. I have been gluten-free for six years and that may also contribute to my attitude.

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I used to make noodles and bread, hubbs loves his home made noodles and bread. This Celiac does control me to a point. Or eles I'd of had some biscuits and gravy this morning. Instead I made me some eggs and bacon. I am on vacation now , it has been an experience , this Gluten thing is all new to me!! But have been working my way around it ....

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Very little processed stuff in my kitchen. I make about 98% from scratch including jams, jellies, salsas, tomato and other sauces, pesto, vinaigrettes and dressings, mayo, ketchups, mustards, breads, crackers, pastas, spice blends, etc. My processed stuff includes rice, Worcestershire and soy sauces and anchovies and capers. No canned soups. I freeze my own veg and dry my own herbs. Heck - I even make ricotta.

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I wouldn't say it controls me - I like to cook, so I think it's cool to do this anyway.  Also, I want to teach my daughter how to cook, what goes into her food, and how to eat a variety of foods in creative ways that will nourish her body.  So, cooking it is!

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Well I do like corn chips LOL , I am begining to think I don't really like the crackers, well lets say I liked them but whoa !! Way to much salt for me!! Well corn chips also but I like them better!! Noodles I can live w/o bread I can live w/o never been about them anyway. I have been eating alot of fresh veggies and and good meats :) I think I will sometimes indulge in the Processed , but for the most part I will eat my meat, beans or rice, and my vegetable :) I am happy and I am taking care of me! 

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My daughter gave me this recipe I am going to try it when I get back from Vaca :) 

 

 


  • Homemade Cliff Bars (no bake!)
  • There is plenty of room for variation here, so let your mind and tastebuds run wild. I have a few variation ideas to get you started. And yes, you can definitely double this recipe and press into a 13×9-inch pan insteads of an 8-inch pan.
  • 1 and ¼ cups crisp rice cereal (e.g., I like Erwhon Crisp Brown, but Rice Krispies are fine)
  • 1 cup uncooked quick-cooking oats
  • 2 tablespoons ground flaxseed (flaxseed meal)1/4 cup finely chopped dried fruit (e.g., raisins, dried cranberries, dried cherries, etc.)
  • ¼ cup finely chopped nuts or seeds (pepitas are great)
  • ⅓ cup honey, maple syrup or brown rice syrup
  • ½ cup nut or seed butter of your choice (e.g., peanut butter, almond butter, sunflower seed butter)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Optional: ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
 

 

Instructions
  1. Combine the rice cereal, oats, flaxseed meal, dried fruit, and nuts in a large bowl.
  2. Combine the syrup and nut butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until melted and well-blended (alternatively microwave in small microwave-safe bowl 30-60 seconds until melted). Stir in vanilla until blended.
  3. Pour nut butter mixture over cereal mixture, stirring until coated (use a wooden spoon at first, then get your hands in it. It will be sticky, but this way you can really coat everything. Just scrape off your hands when you’re done).
  4. Press mixture firmly into an 8-inch square pan (sprayed with nonstick cooking spray) using a large square of wax paper (really tamp it down).
  5. Cool in pan on a wire rack, then chill at least 30 minutes to help it set.
  6. Cut into 12 bars. (Wrap bars tightly in plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator).
  7.  
 

 

 
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