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Quercetin


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#1 Larapiz

 
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Posted 25 June 2013 - 03:17 PM

Quercetin is also a mast cell stabilizer, and it might have beneficial effects similar to cromolyn - helping people to eat foods without having a reaction, and preventing reactions to new foods. 


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#2 kareng

 
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Posted 25 June 2013 - 03:20 PM

Quercetin is also a mast cell stabilizer, and it might have beneficial effects similar to cromolyn - helping people to eat foods without having a reaction, and preventing reactions to new foods. 

 

 

It sounds like you are saying these things are a way for Celiacs to eat gluten?   I would think the Celiac Centers would recommend them if that is true.


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#3 Larapiz

 
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Posted 25 June 2013 - 03:57 PM

It sounds like you are saying these things are a way for Celiacs to eat gluten? 

Not at all.  I'm talking about the reactions to non-gluten foods. 

Mast cell stabilizers likely do nothing to block the autoimmune process that is triggered by gluten.


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#4 kareng

 
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Posted 25 June 2013 - 04:24 PM

Not at all.  I'm talking about the reactions to non-gluten foods. 

Mast cell stabilizers likely do nothing to block the autoimmune process that is triggered by gluten.

 

 

Good to clarify that.  This is a Celiac Forum, and someone might think you were suggesting it for them. 

 

Carry on.  :D


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Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice. - Dave Barry
 
“The main reason Santa is so jolly is because he knows where all the bad girls live.”  - George Carlin
 
“One can never have enough socks," said Dumbledore. "Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn't get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.”  - J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone
 
 
 
 
 

 


#5 Larapiz

 
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Posted 25 June 2013 - 05:35 PM

Good to clarify that.  This is a Celiac Forum, and someone might think you were suggesting it for them. 

 

Carry on.  :D

Mast cell stabilizers might prevent the obvious reaction that a lot of celiacs have when they eat gluten.  Celiacs have told me their reactions to gluten are similar to my reactions to many foods, so what decreases the symptoms for me, would likely also decrease celiacs' symptoms after eating gluten. 

However, this does NOT mean that the autoimmune process in celiac disease would be stopped by a mast cell stabilizer!

It's tempting to conclude that if you don't have obvious symptoms after eating a food, it's OK.  But that is clearly not true. 


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#6 foam

 
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Posted 27 June 2013 - 06:37 AM

I understand what you are saying, as even the Zyrtec lowers my reaction, when I have them. I have problems with some additives/yeasts/something but it's always less when I'm on a blocker than when I'm not. I'm sure a proper mast cell stabilizer would really take the edge off the reaction. I can't test gluten vs zrytec because I haven't been eating gluten so long I no longer have antibodies to it.

 

You don't need to look very hard to see that immune blockers are effective against celiac disease as you can see here http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10848661 I bet you could go on cyclosporine and eat as much bread as you want, but the cyclosporine would kill you quicker than the gluten anyway :P! but it just proves it's your own immune system doing you in.


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#7 Larapiz

 
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Posted 27 June 2013 - 08:26 AM



"You don't need to look very hard to see that immune blockers are effective against celiac disease"

 

Not a good thing to assume!  Just because something reduces the SYMPTOMS of gluten reactions, does not mean it's stopping the basic process.  The paper you linked to, does not imply that either. 

Celiac disease has too many serious consequences to take the risk of eating gluten.  Unless you're very old and figure you'll die soon anyway ...

 

Also, a mast cell stabilizer lessens reactions that happen via the mast cells.  But the immune process in celiac disease starts through IgA antibodies as I understand - and who knows if a mast cell stabilizer would affect that. 

 

Anyway, my reactions to non-gluten foods are lessened by cromolyn.  Which suggests these reactions do start with mast cells and something similar to standard allergies is going on. 


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#8 foam

 
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Posted 10 July 2013 - 08:48 PM

I received my 100 capsules of Ketoferin, I've taken two so far.. gees it makes you sleepy, they say you gets used to it though. It certainly lets you eat without any gut pain and inflammation though. I'll let you know how it's going in a week or so


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#9 Gemini

 
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Posted 11 July 2013 - 06:57 AM

"You don't need to look very hard to see that immune blockers are effective against celiac disease"

 

Not a good thing to assume!  Just because something reduces the SYMPTOMS of gluten reactions, does not mean it's stopping the basic process.  The paper you linked to, does not imply that either. 

Celiac disease has too many serious consequences to take the risk of eating gluten.  Unless you're very old and figure you'll die soon anyway ...

 

Also, a mast cell stabilizer lessens reactions that happen via the mast cells.  But the immune process in celiac disease starts through IgA antibodies as I understand - and who knows if a mast cell stabilizer would affect that. 

 

Anyway, my reactions to non-gluten foods are lessened by cromolyn.  Which suggests these reactions do start with mast cells and something similar to standard allergies is going on. 

You make very valid points here.  Cromolyn is used in eye drops also for allergy related eye problems to stabilize mast cells and I personally use Quercitin for my seasonal allergies.  I have only been taking it for about 2 months but my reactions are less intense and they do not last as long.  I never get sinus infections either.  I can only assume it is working because this week has had some of the most intense weather for me, allergy wise, and I am not doing too bad.  A little tired but not too bad.  It is interesting that it could also be used for stabilizing food reactions.


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