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Has Anyone Healed Some Of Their Intolerances?

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27 replies to this topic

#16 a1956chill

 
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Posted 07 July 2013 - 11:16 AM

Why do you think a lot of B12 would help? 

People can overdose on vitamin D.  Last I heard if you take more than 2000 IU per day, it's recommended you get regular blood level tests of vitamin D.  An overdose can cause serious problems. 

I take a prescription dose of vit D ( 50,000 iu cap) once a week and 5000iu daily and my vit D level  just makes the scale ,. My levels are checked every three months.

I also take mega doses of vit b 12 .


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Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


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#17 foam

 
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Posted 07 July 2013 - 11:34 AM

I also started with the 50,000 IU capsules ! :), we just kept upping the dose until it started to soak in, I was doing one a week for a very long time. I think the regular ones I take now absorb a bit better though, so I take 4x1000


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#18 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 07 July 2013 - 01:05 PM


:D :D :D :D :D :wub: :D :D :D :D :D

Thanks Lisa :)

Takes some of us longer than others-- but there is light at the end of the tunnel ;)
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Patti


"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

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"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

#19 Larapiz

 
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Posted 07 July 2013 - 01:53 PM

I also started with the 50,000 IU capsules ! :), we just kept upping the dose until it started to soak in, I was doing one a week for a very long time. I think the regular ones I take now absorb a bit better though, so I take 4x1000

But why would it help, other than preventing a deficiency?  It sounds like you have malabsorption issues. 


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#20 notme!

 
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Posted 07 July 2013 - 07:41 PM

I also started with the 50,000 IU capsules ! :), we just kept upping the dose until it started to soak in, I was doing one a week for a very long time. I think the regular ones I take now absorb a bit better though, so I take 4x1000

 

that's where i am at now - the 50,000 iu caps 1x per wk - when i started i was at something ridiculous, like 24....  yeah, it makes a HUGE difference, and i can tell when i'm 'due' - doc is going to check how i am doing at next visit.  

But why would it help, other than preventing a deficiency?  It sounds like you have malabsorption issues. 

absolutely, i still have malabsorbtion issues - after years of undiagnosed damage, (as many of us have)  i don't expect my guts to be healed enough to not have malabsorbtion issues.  starting out at 24, and understanding that it takes a while to 'build up' my numbers, an overdose is the least of my worries.  i am more worried about missing my dose, because i only take it once per week.  i am going to see if i can begin taking it (a lesser dose?) once per day - would be easier to remember!!   :)


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#21 foam

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 03:42 AM

I was also in the low 20s and that was after a full summer where I tried to be outside often, who knows where it was the previous winter but I'm betting less than 10 (My wifes level was 16! and she spends more time in the sun than me and doesn't have any health issues).

 

Vitamin D is very important for the gut and immune system, they keep finding out more and more about it each year and tend to re adjust the minimum recommended level up each year. A few years ago most doctors were happy with 60 now everyone is aiming for 120.

 

The trouble I/we have with absorbing Vitamin D unfortunately just highlights how deficient we would be in all the important micro nutrients that you can't easily be tested for. At least with Vit D it's one of the more important things and easy to test and fix.


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#22 Larapiz

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 04:51 AM

Yes vitamin D is important.  It may even help prevent breast cancer and autoimmune diseases, which (I've read) are more common at high latitudes.

But do you know of any reason to take more B12 than is necessary to keep one's blood level in normal range?

I take enough B12 to keep my blood level in normal range, but I haven't heard of a reason to take more. 

Vitamin D is very important for the gut and immune system

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#23 GottaSki

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 06:05 AM

Yes vitamin D is important.  It may even help prevent breast cancer and autoimmune diseases, which (I've read) are more common at high latitudes.

But do you know of any reason to take more B12 than is necessary to keep one's blood level in normal range?

I take enough B12 to keep my blood level in normal range, but I haven't heard of a reason to take more. 

 

I needed to take quite a bit B12 to get it to normal range after diagnosis.  Still not sure the supplementation helped as much as me actually absorbing nutrients from my food -- took about one and a half years post diagnosis for my levels to all read great numbers - .  At diagnosis my D was 17 and my B12 was around 190 -- was anemic my entire life...but not much else was tested nutrient wise until I saw the Celiac Specialist at diagnosis -- everything was at the very low end of normal or official low.  Most had had climbed at 6month, but were not in normal ranges until my year and a half mark.  I stopped all supplements last Fall as I was still having gut issues -- soon will return to a good multivitamin and supplement anything else that may fall back out of range at my next check.

 

If you are below the normal mark in any nutrient -- talk to your doctor about appropriate levels of supplementation.


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#24 a1956chill

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 06:07 AM

Yes vitamin D is important.  It may even help prevent breast cancer and autoimmune diseases, which (I've read) are more common at high latitudes.

But do you know of any reason to take more B12 than is necessary to keep one's blood level in normal range?

I take enough B12 to keep my blood level in normal range, but I haven't heard of a reason to take more. 

Vitamin B12 is a water soluble vitamin  there for difficult to reach a  toxic level. There have been studies that showed no adverse consequences of doses above the RDA  

Vitamin B12 deficiency can potentially cause severe and irreversible damage, especially to the brain and nervous system. At levels only slightly lower than normal, a range of symptoms such as fatigue, depression, and poor memory  may be experienced.

Vitamin B12 deficiency can also cause symptoms of mania and psychosis

 

I also take metformin for diabetes,, studys show that long-term use of metformin substantially increases the risk of B12 deficiency and (in those patients who become deficient) hyperhomocysteinemia, which is "an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, especially among individuals with type 2  diabetes

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Vitamin_B12

 

as gottaski mentioned it is importation to have your levels checked by your doctor.

My vitamin B12 levels are still low ,,,,, years and years of malabsorbtion  issues   will do that I guess


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Gluten free Oct/09
Soy free Nov/10

numerous additional intolerances,, i.e. If it tries to kill me I do not eat it .
After 40+ years of misdiagnoses I was diagnosed with:
Dermatitis Herpetiformis : Positive DH biopsy...... Celiac :based on DH biopsy and diet response.

Osteoporosis before  age 50
Hashimoto's thyroiditis disease .

Diagnosed type 2 Diabetes 

Osteoarthritis

Gilbert's Syndrome , confirmed by gene testing


#25 foam

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 06:57 AM

My doctor suggested to me that you need to take whatever amount of B12 you need to stay feeling good. He says it's different for everyone. In Australia doctors are totally happy with levels around 500 and don't really care if you go under 250. Originally mine only barely made the measurable scale at around 100. Everytime I got an injection of B12 I felt so much better within hours, but I'd feel run down again in about a weeks time... SO I got more injections and until I had a level of 1000. Now whenever it drops under 800 or in fact when ever the level is dropping at all I don't feel well. In Japan they aim for a level around 1500-2000! as the normal. It's amazing how different countries have different ideas of what is normal and what is healthy. Without injections I would have no hope of ever getting my levels over 200 and so I would feel sick all the time. 

 

I was so deficient in B12 at one stage I had a bloated gut and numb hands with swollen tingling fingers.


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#26 Pegleg84

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:19 AM

I (try to, slacked off this year) take Vitamin D supplements all winter at least, which definitely helps keep the sniffles away. B12 and other B vitamins are supposed to be good for combating depression and generally good for energy and mental health. My b12 tends to be a bit low, as does my iron levels, borderline anyway, so I do (try to remember to) take supplements.

 

Back on the intolerances front, I'm also encouraged by other people's success stories. I've been off dairy for 1 1/2 years, and now can tolerate small amounts of cheese on occasion, and small amounts of butter (ghee is better). Also, if I get into dairy my reaction isn't nearly as bad as gluten or soy, so not the end of the world. If I can get cheese back at least, even just goat/sheep, I'd be a very happy lady.

I also haven't touched whole quinoa since last summer, and need to be brave enough to give it another shot.

I think soy is permanently off the menu, however. My reaction is more immediate and often worse than if I get glutened. It's nasty (and makes me nasty too. no fun)

 

So there is hope! Yay!


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~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.


#27 seraphim

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:24 AM

I was just watching a youtube video yesterday about how normal serum blood tests are not good enough to test for b12. I see my family doctor on wednesday to get bloodwork done...what should i ask for to make sure about my b12?


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#28 Larapiz

 
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Posted 08 July 2013 - 04:01 PM

I was just watching a youtube video yesterday about how normal serum blood tests are not good enough to test for b12. I see my family doctor on wednesday to get bloodwork done...what should i ask for to make sure about my b12?

http://veganhealth.org/b12/tested

veganhealth.org is a website by an RD, Jack Norris, who gives good reliable information. 

Someone told me they considered B12 to be an upper.  I never noticed that, but maybe if I took a lot, I would. 


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