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Medic-Alert Bracelet

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52 replies to this topic

#31 notme!

 
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Posted 24 July 2013 - 11:25 AM

 

Maybe the James Bond Medi-Alert might be a good fit?  I would kill for some of those toys...... :)

NOW you're talkin' !!  comes with it's own theme song........    ;)   laser beam......... :D


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arlene

misdiagnosed for 25 years!
just as i was getting my affairs in order to die of malnutrition...
gluten free 7/2010
blood test negative
celiac confirmed by endoscopy 9/2010

 

only YOU can prevent forest fires - smokey t. bear

 

have a nice day :)

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#32 Adalaide

 
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Posted 31 July 2013 - 09:53 AM

Okay... not exactly rocket launchers or lasers or anything, but this company was one of those "recommended whatever" on my facebook and I went there for lols. Also not exactly a medical alert bracelet but its cute!

 

http://www.inspireds...h.html?q=celiac


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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#33 notme!

 
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Posted 31 July 2013 - 10:07 AM

Okay... not exactly rocket launchers or lasers or anything, but this company was one of those "recommended whatever" on my facebook and I went there for lols. Also not exactly a medical alert bracelet but its cute!

 

http://www.inspireds...h.html?q=celiac

those are cute, addy :)  i'm sure it could be modified to at least blow up lolz


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arlene

misdiagnosed for 25 years!
just as i was getting my affairs in order to die of malnutrition...
gluten free 7/2010
blood test negative
celiac confirmed by endoscopy 9/2010

 

only YOU can prevent forest fires - smokey t. bear

 

have a nice day :)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator


#34 GwenO

 
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Posted 31 July 2013 - 01:11 PM

About the tattoo thing.....this is something I will never understand with people.  I would NEVER get a tattoo but have no issue if someone does. Everyone has the right to do what they want with their body but I must tell you, tattoo's are not professional at all.  If you have a great job and want to look professional and have a tattoo that might show, I would agree to cover it up. You don't see judges or doctors or engineers sporting a tattoo on the job and this might just be that this mindset seems anal retentive to the tattoo crowd, but it isn't.  You are not going to be taken seriously in many jobs if you walk around with a tattoo hanging out.  Some employers will not mind but many would.  People have gotten this attitude lately that they can do whatever they want with no consequences but real life is not like that and once you do something like this, there's no turning back.  My nephew has a good job, I love him dearly but he is a walking tattoo on his chest and arms.  I think it looks horrible but he covers them up for his job....he gets it. I have never told him I hate tattoo's because I love him too much.

 

The other issue is that, and this is delicate, is that it was a Jewish Nursing Home.  Jews were tattooed during the war by the Nazi scum and they may take offense at seeing them on someone who does this by choice.  People in nursing homes today might be old enough to have lived through the war.  That is huge. I have many Jewish friends and they would never, ever think of getting a tattoo.  They feel it defiles the body.  That thought may not be prevalent amoung all Jews but for many, it is.

 

I agree with Stephanie regarding an ID bracelet. Being unconscious, as a Celiac, would not cause a problem.  Remember, the government, if you in the US, has now gone and forced doctors to do medical records electronically.  Anyone in the medical field, giving treatment to a patient, has access to your medical records.   As long as your problem with iodine is in there, they will know.  If you are unconscious, they will not be giving you anything by mouth to cause a reaction and an IV poses no threat.

I work in a hospital.  You do indeed see doctors with tattoos.  And social workers, and dieticians, and nurses, etc.  One of our RN's has full sleeves, her neck is tattoed as well.  If I were sick she'd be one of my first choices.  I have a large one on my left wrist.  I work regularly with seniors of many cultures.  The only response I've gotten has been "oh how pretty".  I would assume if they don't like it they don't say anything.  I would also assume the majority of the population knows it's no indicator of someone's ability to do their job.  Times change.  Things that were once unacceptable now are.  I'm sorry - I am in no way minimalizing the horror of the holocaust - however, it's like saying men shouldn't grow a beard because the Taliban forced some men to.


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#35 howlnmad

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 09:43 AM

Your sense of humor is as intact as ever!   :lol:

 

If your husband really thinks you need one, there must be a nice Medi-Alert bracelet out there with some diamonds for bling.  Now THAT would be worth wearing!   ;)

Yeah, that ain't gonna happen.

 

The rocket launcher, sure thing.


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#36 GottaSki

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 11:53 AM

How'd I miss this for so long?

 

Anywhoo...I started wearing one when my silly reaction to exercise got a bit dicey -- coincided with my intolerances causing more scary reactions.  is nice because i never have to carry id anymore when out exercising...doubles as my "RoadID" -- front has med sh!t and back has

 

my name

DOB

DL#

ICE (hubs cell phone #)

 

 

I clip mine to different pretty bracelets - currently it is on a clear crystal with gold jobbie....


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#37 Gemini

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 12:06 PM

I work in a hospital.  You do indeed see doctors with tattoos.  And social workers, and dieticians, and nurses, etc.  One of our RN's has full sleeves, her neck is tattoed as well.  If I were sick she'd be one of my first choices.  I have a large one on my left wrist.  I work regularly with seniors of many cultures.  The only response I've gotten has been "oh how pretty".  I would assume if they don't like it they don't say anything.  I would also assume the majority of the population knows it's no indicator of someone's ability to do their job.  Times change.  Things that were once unacceptable now are.  I'm sorry - I am in no way minimalizing the horror of the holocaust - however, it's like saying men shouldn't grow a beard because the Taliban forced some men to.

Sorry but I do not agree with you on this one.  It is most unprofessional to be all tattooed up and comparing tattoos to beards is apples and oranges. The "times change" mantra doesn't cut it either. Those are just excuses.  Like I said, if this is what people think looks great, it's their body and they can do what they want.  But when you have a job that requires high degrees of responsibility and professionalism, being all tattooed up doesn't cut it.  We have let out standards down in America way too much and it's a real shame because it does matter.  Not to mention that getting a tattoo puts a person at risk for hepatitis.  Not everyone can absolutely insure that the parlor they go to is safe and clean and the last thing I want coming near me is a nurse who may have been exposed to hepatitis. I know people who contracted it by having a tattoo so don't say that it is rare. It's not.


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#38 AlwaysLearning

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 12:18 PM

Considering that gluten does show up in many medications, you've got me all thinking that maybe I should be more concerned about the whole bracelet issue. And I've got an antibiotic allergy as well so I really should do at least a card in my wallet.


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#39 GottaSki

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 01:27 PM

Considering that gluten does show up in many medications, you've got me all thinking that maybe I should be more concerned about the whole bracelet issue. And I've got an antibiotic allergy as well so I really should do at least a card in my wallet.

 

I have a letter from my doctor that I carry so that if anyone ever questions concessions I am asking for can see it...have yet to show it, but it is nice to have when traveling.

 

The bracelet became more important for me as I was having severe breathing and anaphylaxis induced by excercise, heat and some foods (not gluten).

 

Make sure your electronic medical record has gluten listed under allergy -- even though Celiac Disease is not an allergy -- there is not a box in the medical record that is given the same attention as "allergies" so that is the one I utilize which all my docs agree with.

 

Wouldn't run out and get a bracelet unless you can foresee a situation where it would help you or to give a loved one peace of mind.

 

The truth is most medical situations - even emergent - you will be able to talk with your care givers to alert them to Celiac Disease/gluten.


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#40 GwenO

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 04:09 PM

Sorry but I do not agree with you on this one.  It is most unprofessional to be all tattooed up and comparing tattoos to beards is apples and oranges. The "times change" mantra doesn't cut it either. Those are just excuses.  Like I said, if this is what people think looks great, it's their body and they can do what they want.  But when you have a job that requires high degrees of responsibility and professionalism, being all tattooed up doesn't cut it.  We have let out standards down in America way too much and it's a real shame because it does matter.  Not to mention that getting a tattoo puts a person at risk for hepatitis.  Not everyone can absolutely insure that the parlor they go to is safe and clean and the last thing I want coming near me is a nurse who may have been exposed to hepatitis. I know people who contracted it by having a tattoo so don't say that it is rare. It's not.

Yes, well, I choose to base people's competency on their actions, as opposed to their appearance.  I am also intelligent enough to choose a clean establishment, that uses new needles, the same way I choose my dentist (another place where people have contracted hepatitis), my nail technician (again, potential hepatitis) if I chose to have one, even my doctor etc.  Nobody can ensure anything completely - it's more a case of making informed decisions.  I was not comparing tattoos to beards.  I was comparing the risk of offending different cultures who were subject to inhumane treatment.  For the record, nurses and other health professionals risk exposure to hepatitis, TB, HIV, meningitis, and a host of other contagions on a daily basis.  Again, we are intelligent and responsible and recognize the need to to protect ourselves and others; this is not a profession that is chosen lightly, I assure you.  I would advise the general public to pay much more attention to the level of personal cleanliness their nurse exhibits; in particular are their hands clean, do they glove, and do they wash their hands before and after each patient.  I can tell you definitively that this is infinitely more important to your health than whether or not they have tattoos.


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#41 GwenO

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 04:16 PM

once again, i am considering getting one.  my husband thinks i should, because of all the fad dieters and he is worried someone won't take my health issue seriously.  my son is t1 diabetic and is telling me not to be a hypocrite <because i wanted HIM to have one - lolz - he got a giant tattoo on his chest of the medic-alert symbol)  has anyone gotten one?  i am *constantly* explaining that i am not dieting to 'cleanse' or lose weight :huh:  or any other reason.  maybe it would be easier to just point to the bracelet....?  i dunno.  i'm in this for the long haul, might as well own it.  it would shut up some people (that might be worth it right there)  <_<   what do y'all think?

I keep thinking about one for my daughter too.  Other parents often just don't take it seriously, and although she is really great about checking sometimes adults actually try to overrule her.  I think there'd be less argument with a bracelet.......


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#42 GottaSki

 
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Posted 01 August 2013 - 04:20 PM

I keep thinking about one for my daughter too.  Other parents often just don't take it seriously, and although she is really great about checking sometimes adults actually try to overrule her.  I think there'd be less argument with a bracelet.......

 

I think they are wise for children....at least they have something to point to when they try to explain to dismissive adults.


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#43 Monklady123

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 03:35 AM

A medical alert bracelet isn't really supposed to be for people to "take notice", like in a restaurant or something like that. It's intended to be for emergencies, like someone is unconscious or disoriented. The emergency personnel (EMTs, etc.) can see the information on the bracelet and treat the person accordingly. For example, some people who are having a diabetes emergency can act/look like they're drunk. If a police officer thought the person was drunk and just took them into the local jail the person could die. But if the bracelet alerts them to diabetes the police can call the EMTs immediately.

 

So personally I would never wear one for celiac since it's not an immediately life-threatening condition. If I'm unconscious from something else the last thing the medical workers are going to do is feed me food with gluten.

 

And about those tattoos....many (most?) observant Jews do not believe in tattoos because of Leviticus 19:28. There is the argument that can be made that the verse was written to counter the pagan religious beliefs of that time, in an effort to encourage Jewish people from slipping into those practices and beliefs. But many Jews today do not believe in tattoos.

 

eta: I'm talking about adults. For a child it might be a good idea, especially when they're younger and maybe aren't good at advocating for themselves yet. Although I still wouldn't expect people to "take notice" of it, you'd have to speak up about it.


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#44 StephanieL

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 04:36 AM

 

So personally I would never wear one for celiac since it's not an immediately life-threatening condition. If I'm unconscious from something else the last thing the medical workers are going to do is feed me food with gluten.

 

/\  Yeah, that!


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#45 Adalaide

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 07:20 AM

So personally I would never wear one for celiac since it's not an immediately life-threatening condition. If I'm unconscious from something else the last thing the medical workers are going to do is feed me food with gluten.

 

I think one of the things that we all need to be and keep aware of is that celiac can in fact be a disease that becomes immediately life threatening. It is easy to think that it isn't and can't be because of all the complications that take place in the future but many either haven't heard of or simply don't take seriously the very rare, but very serious, complication of celiac crisis. Celiac crisis is quite life threatening if not appropriately treated in a timely manner. And while it is likely that a patient in this situation would be capable of explaining their situation to an ER staff, but it is also possible that you may not be able to and having anything that may help identify you and your medical status could help.

 

Some people have certain opinions about tattoos and I know some who although they are sensible people, refuse to be appealed to through logic. Although I am Mormon, I also have no problem with tattoos and even though I "should" be against them for myself, I'm not. (We are actually encouraged to make our own personal decisions, not just given a rule book to follow.)  Food for thought. Someone who is in the medical profession would choose their tattoo parlor with care and not go to the kind that gives people hepatitis. Additionally, employers such as hospitals screen their staff for hepatitis, so do daycares and schools. Barring a social taboo internationally, a tattoo isn't impeding anyone's ability to do their job, I just don't see what right we have to judge.


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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014






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