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Medic-Alert Bracelet

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52 replies to this topic

#46 GottaSki

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 08:21 AM

A medical alert bracelet isn't really supposed to be for people to "take notice", like in a restaurant or something like that. It's intended to be for emergencies, like someone is unconscious or disoriented. The emergency personnel (EMTs, etc.) can see the information on the bracelet and treat the person accordingly. For example, some people who are having a diabetes emergency can act/look like they're drunk. If a police officer thought the person was drunk and just took them into the local jail the person could die. But if the bracelet alerts them to diabetes the police can call the EMTs immediately.

So personally I would never wear one for celiac since it's not an immediately life-threatening condition. If I'm unconscious from something else the last thing the medical workers are going to do is feed me food with gluten.


I agree regarding medic alert bracelets for adults....as stated I wear mine as I have severe breathing difficulties and have had three anaphalaxis episodes which have worsened over time.

I respectfully disagree for children.....my Grandson is five - gluten-free for four years and completely able to explain his dietary needs and safety to any adult -- yet had explosive diarhea repeatedly at school for the first three months of Kindergarten. If a bracelet will remind teachers and volunteer parents of the serios nature of his situation (doctors orders have been provided to the school) - then this is another valid use of these bracelets.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


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#47 Monklady123

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 08:40 AM

Yes Lisa (since you were quoting me, I'll answer) -- that's why I also said in my post that it's different for children. ;)


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#48 GottaSki

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 12:12 PM

Yes Lisa (since you were quoting me, I'll answer) -- that's why I also said in my post that it's different for children. ;)

 

My apologies...did not read the last paragraph carefully...did not copy anything after you changed to tattoos.


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#49 StephanieL

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 04:53 PM

I think one of the things that we all need to be and keep aware of is that celiac can in fact be a disease that becomes immediately life threatening. 

 

In my research I have not found any fatalities due to a celiac crisis.  Is there any research that indicates this is the case?  My understanding of a celiac crisis is that it is profoundly rare and  typically when someone is undiagnosed (so they wouldn't have a medic alert bracelet).  


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#50 Adalaide

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 05:04 PM

The quickest and most readily available study I can find is this one, in which most but not all patients were undiagnosed. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20417725 I'm sure there more info out there, which I am not going to go looking for tonight. At any rate, my point was that it can be an immediately life threatening illness, not just years from now... either way, it requires eating what is basically poison so I'm not saying this is common or something people healed need to worry about. Just that it does happen.


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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

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CRPS DX March 2014


#51 StephanieL

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 05:30 PM

If you have time to get to the hospital, it isn't immediately life threatening so is medic alert necessary in this case?  


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#52 Adalaide

 
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Posted 02 August 2013 - 09:05 PM

Not all anaphylactic reactions happen within seconds or just a few minutes, it is not unheard of for someone with this type of reaction to have time to get to a hospital. If it were always a matter of if you have time to get to a hospital it isn't life threatening, how do you figure any child is ever diagnosed with a life threatening allergy after having a reaction and being rushed to the ER? It was my understanding that the entire point of the ER is to treat life threatening emergencies. How long it takes to get to an ER and whether or not you survived the trip has no bearing on whether or not the issue is or is not immediately life threatening.


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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#53 StephanieL

 
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Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:00 AM

Again, if you can find any literature where a celiac crises has killed someone, I would be willing to think about it again but I've found nothing like that.  Perhaps saying "time to get to the ER" vs. a potentially fatal in minutes was my misuse of words. Sure, some people would have time to get to the ER but many wouldn't make it there without having been given Epi which would be on them hopefully and the medic alert bracelet would alert to this.  To die of dehydration (which is the key of a Celiac crisis) takes approximately anywhere from 3-10 days. 

 

I haven't ever seen where anyone with Celiac disease has died from a small ingestion of gluten. Again, I'm willing to rethink my position on this if you can find literature to support that. 

 

I won't drone on about this any more as I think everyone here knows my stance :) lol


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