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Going Gluten-Free How Bad What Is At First?


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#16 Renegade

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 04:41 AM

I would definitely suggest a sleep study. My husband has sleep apnea...that was scary and he had no idea. He's actually had multiple surgeries to fix a deviated septum, had his rather large tonsils out, they shocked his tongue because it was too loose...all sorts of stuff. Helped for a while until he put on more weight. He can't use the c-pap machine because it actually ends up completely cutting off his airway.

I had a friend who had even more severe sleep apnea than my husband....which is REALLY bad. When she wore her c-pap mask she would wake up feeling refreshed and like she slept but if she didn't she slept more and woke up feeling like she hadn't slept at all. :( I never did understand why she wouldn't then wear that mask every night....but I imagine it isn't the most comfortable thing either. She also had Crohn's and Ulcerative Colitis....it's been 2 years since we lost her. And having to travel down this path of gluten free and gaining all this knowledge...I wish she were still around so we could do it together. :( Today would have been her 35th birthday....sorry she's been pretty strongly on my mind today.

Very interesting, how do I go about doing this, is there a type of specialist I need to google for?


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#17 mommy2krj

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:06 AM

Yes...you would probably need a referral from your regular doctor depending on how things work by you. But you would need to see a sleep specialist or an ENT (ear, nose, throat doctor). My husband's ENT just happened to also be his allergist so the doc had a pretty good grasp on what my husband was dealing with. He has some pretty nasty seasonal allergies and allergies to cats and dogs and dust and oh yeah....the stuff that's in beer! I can't remember if it's the wheat, the barley or the hops. Oy. He still drinks it though and then wonders why he is so stuffed up all the time. It obviously isn't a severe allergy.

My oldest son also has sleep apnea....we got a referral (finally after about 5 years of me asking for one!!!) through the pediatrician. I'm going to have to have another one for him. He had his tonsils out too....and that helped for a while. We need to do another one to make sure the tonsil removal worked. Though, given his size and family history....I doubt it.

My youngest had his tonsils and adenoids out as well right in between his father's and his brother's surgeries. It was good fun in our house! He definitely recovered the quickest....joys of being a little kid! But his tonsils were huge and he had sleep apnea at the age of 3 and he is no where near overweight. (A lot of people think only overweight people can have sleep apnea...not true!!!)

Anyway...hope that helps!


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#18 bartfull

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 10:00 AM

I'm going to say this again:

 

You're giving up a lot of things at once - gluten, dairy, weed, and coffee. (COFFEE!!???) Your body is in withdrawal from all four of those things. It's to be expected that you feel lousy right now. PLUS, you have gotten glutened three times in the past month and this early into the diet as far as withdrawal goes, you are starting at square one each time. Just bear with it and give it some more time. If you can avoid getting glutened, by this time in August you should be feeling LOTS better. I know that sounds like a long time but you can handle anything for three or four weeks.

 

Trust me. :)

 

What you are suffering from is withdrawal, plain and simple. If you can get through the next three or four weeks without being glutened, you will be fine. If you keep looking for other reasons for your problems and cutting out other foods and thinking that getting glutened isn't doing THAT much harm, you are just going to prolong your suffering. Withdrawal is common - most of us have gone through EXACTLY what you are going through. After a few weeks we were fine and so will you be.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#19 Renegade

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 11:13 AM

I'm going to say this again:

 

You're giving up a lot of things at once - gluten, dairy, weed, and coffee. (COFFEE!!???) Your body is in withdrawal from all four of those things. It's to be expected that you feel lousy right now. PLUS, you have gotten glutened three times in the past month and this early into the diet as far as withdrawal goes, you are starting at square one each time. Just bear with it and give it some more time. If you can avoid getting glutened, by this time in August you should be feeling LOTS better. I know that sounds like a long time but you can handle anything for three or four weeks.

 

Trust me. :)

 

What you are suffering from is withdrawal, plain and simple. If you can get through the next three or four weeks without being glutened, you will be fine. If you keep looking for other reasons for your problems and cutting out other foods and thinking that getting glutened isn't doing THAT much harm, you are just going to prolong your suffering. Withdrawal is common - most of us have gone through EXACTLY what you are going through. After a few weeks we were fine and so will you be.

Hopefully so, I am going to continue to keep what I cut out away though, see now I was going to cut out melatonin, should I not?


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#20 bartfull

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 11:23 AM

It's your choice but I will tell you that I had had insomnia most of my life, went gluten-free and it got even worse for about three weeks or so, then resolved. I now sleep like a baby. I never used melatonin or any other sleep-aids so I can't advise you on that.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#21 AlwaysLearning

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 12:11 PM

Presume that spaghetti sauce contains gluten unless it is actually marked as gluten free on the label. It is often an ingredient in the tomato paste. So don't blame nightshades right off the bat if you haven't found a premade sauce that is made more carefully.

I've heard anecdotal stories of coffee becoming bothersome for those who go gluten free. Curious as to why, I found an article about how a protein in coffee may be similar enough to that in gluten to be confused by the body. I don't drink coffee so I don't have personal experience.

Sleep apnea is one of the symptoms of gluten allergies so if you do have an apnea, you can expect that they would improve after going and staying completely gluten free. Insomnia is also a symptom of a gluten allergy so going gluten free helps with that too. But I wouldn't start scheduling appointments for a sleep study just yet. You have already admitted that your attempt to go gluten free has had plenty of hiccups so getting glutened could still be the cause of your fatigue. Don't underestimate how debilitating the "brain fog" can be.

If you have had repeated glutenings since going gluten free, you should completely expect to feel awful. You would not only be going through the reactions but also the withdrawals over and over again - pretty much the worst thing you can do to your body. Each glutening takes days to recover from, or even weeks, and they become more noticeable the longer you have been gluten free, becoming more sensitive to even microscopic amounts.

Until you have completely decontaminated your kitchen, replacing cutting boards, non-stick pots and pans, colanders, toasters, and any sort of plastic utensils, presume that they are still sources of gluten.

Until you have researched every ingredient in every processed food that was previously in your cupboard, presume that they either contain an ingredient that has gluten in it, or may have been processed in a facility that is contaminated with gluten. 

But I wouldn't beat myself up too badly for making mistakes or not wanting to believe that gluten can be so hard to rid from our homes. I'd make a bet that every single person who has ever gone gluten free has made dozens of mistakes or had some remaining wishful thinking, especially at the beginning.

Once you do manage to truly eat gluten free, you should expect that many odd little things that you had been living with forever and didn't ever realize were caused by gluten will disappear and many of them will only take a day or two. Other problems will persist or even get worse in which case some other vitamin or mineral deficiency is likely to be to blame.

My personal experience was that probiotics weren't needed. My digestive system was already in balance from that point of view though I don't avoid things like yogurt or raw foods that would add them to my diet naturally. 

But I do suspect that many people feel considerably better right away because they start taking gluten-free multi vitamins as recommended - and if you do have any deficiencies, you could feel the effects of supplements within minutes. 

Don't forget that gluten allergies cause malabsorption/malnutrition and this will continue to be a problem until the damage done to your digestive system has had an opportunity to heal. And until you are 100% gluten free and manage to stay that way long term, you're still not healing and damage is still being done.

 

And though many people actually do suffer from milk, soy, and corn allergies in addition to gluten, this is not the same for everyone and not to be presumed. If you're having problems just going gluten free, you might try eliminating them one at a time. Keeping a food diary seems like a good idea if you suspect that you have additional allergies. 

If you don't have grocery stores in your area that carry a wide variety of gluten-free products, you may need to seek out one that specializes in organic and natural foods in order to find premade foods and vitamins that are gluten free. Your other options are to shop online, have your local grocery store make special orders for you, or to make your own. And no doubt, if you post any sort of question on this forum asking others for thoughts about their favorite gluten-free alternatives, you'll get a response. 


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#22 Renegade

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 01:41 PM

Presume that spaghetti sauce contains gluten unless it is actually marked as gluten free on the label. It is often an ingredient in the tomato paste. So don't blame nightshades right off the bat if you haven't found a premade sauce that is made more carefully.

I've heard anecdotal stories of coffee becoming bothersome for those who go gluten free. Curious as to why, I found an article about how a protein in coffee may be similar enough to that in gluten to be confused by the body. I don't drink coffee so I don't have personal experience.

Sleep apnea is one of the symptoms of gluten allergies so if you do have an apnea, you can expect that they would improve after going and staying completely gluten free. Insomnia is also a symptom of a gluten allergy so going gluten free helps with that too. But I wouldn't start scheduling appointments for a sleep study just yet. You have already admitted that your attempt to go gluten free has had plenty of hiccups so getting glutened could still be the cause of your fatigue. Don't underestimate how debilitating the "brain fog" can be.

If you have had repeated glutenings since going gluten free, you should completely expect to feel awful. You would not only be going through the reactions but also the withdrawals over and over again - pretty much the worst thing you can do to your body. Each glutening takes days to recover from, or even weeks, and they become more noticeable the longer you have been gluten free, becoming more sensitive to even microscopic amounts.

Until you have completely decontaminated your kitchen, replacing cutting boards, non-stick pots and pans, colanders, toasters, and any sort of plastic utensils, presume that they are still sources of gluten.

Until you have researched every ingredient in every processed food that was previously in your cupboard, presume that they either contain an ingredient that has gluten in it, or may have been processed in a facility that is contaminated with gluten. 

But I wouldn't beat myself up too badly for making mistakes or not wanting to believe that gluten can be so hard to rid from our homes. I'd make a bet that every single person who has ever gone gluten free has made dozens of mistakes or had some remaining wishful thinking, especially at the beginning.

Once you do manage to truly eat gluten free, you should expect that many odd little things that you had been living with forever and didn't ever realize were caused by gluten will disappear and many of them will only take a day or two. Other problems will persist or even get worse in which case some other vitamin or mineral deficiency is likely to be to blame.

My personal experience was that probiotics weren't needed. My digestive system was already in balance from that point of view though I don't avoid things like yogurt or raw foods that would add them to my diet naturally. 

But I do suspect that many people feel considerably better right away because they start taking gluten-free multi vitamins as recommended - and if you do have any deficiencies, you could feel the effects of supplements within minutes. 

Don't forget that gluten allergies cause malabsorption/malnutrition and this will continue to be a problem until the damage done to your digestive system has had an opportunity to heal. And until you are 100% gluten free and manage to stay that way long term, you're still not healing and damage is still being done.

 

And though many people actually do suffer from milk, soy, and corn allergies in addition to gluten, this is not the same for everyone and not to be presumed. If you're having problems just going gluten free, you might try eliminating them one at a time. Keeping a food diary seems like a good idea if you suspect that you have additional allergies. 

If you don't have grocery stores in your area that carry a wide variety of gluten-free products, you may need to seek out one that specializes in organic and natural foods in order to find premade foods and vitamins that are gluten free. Your other options are to shop online, have your local grocery store make special orders for you, or to make your own. And no doubt, if you post any sort of question on this forum asking others for thoughts about their favorite gluten-free alternatives, you'll get a response. 

Well I was making my own spaghetti sauce, and would buy tomato sauce and paste, garlic beef, spices and pepper. I wouldn't get any already made spaghetti sauce.

 

I suspect my almonds to be cross contaminated even thought it doesn't say it may contain wheat, the other day i had them in a considerable amount and I had all my spasm and bloating come back, but so did I the day prior from hemp protein, smoking weed and just anything really. I'll have to call and make sure the are safe.


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#23 mommy2krj

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 07:19 PM

Presume that spaghetti sauce contains gluten unless it is actually marked as gluten free on the label. It is often an ingredient in the tomato paste. So don't blame nightshades right off the bat if you haven't found a premade sauce that is made more carefully.

I've heard anecdotal stories of coffee becoming bothersome for those who go gluten free. Curious as to why, I found an article about how a protein in coffee may be similar enough to that in gluten to be confused by the body. I don't drink coffee so I don't have personal experience.

Sleep apnea is one of the symptoms of gluten allergies so if you do have an apnea, you can expect that they would improve after going and staying completely gluten free. Insomnia is also a symptom of a gluten allergy so going gluten free helps with that too. But I wouldn't start scheduling appointments for a sleep study just yet. You have already admitted that your attempt to go gluten free has had plenty of hiccups so getting glutened could still be the cause of your fatigue. Don't underestimate how debilitating the "brain fog" can be.

If you have had repeated glutenings since going gluten free, you should completely expect to feel awful. You would not only be going through the reactions but also the withdrawals over and over again - pretty much the worst thing you can do to your body. Each glutening takes days to recover from, or even weeks, and they become more noticeable the longer you have been gluten free, becoming more sensitive to even microscopic amounts.

Until you have completely decontaminated your kitchen, replacing cutting boards, non-stick pots and pans, colanders, toasters, and any sort of plastic utensils, presume that they are still sources of gluten.

Until you have researched every ingredient in every processed food that was previously in your cupboard, presume that they either contain an ingredient that has gluten in it, or may have been processed in a facility that is contaminated with gluten. 

But I wouldn't beat myself up too badly for making mistakes or not wanting to believe that gluten can be so hard to rid from our homes. I'd make a bet that every single person who has ever gone gluten free has made dozens of mistakes or had some remaining wishful thinking, especially at the beginning.

Once you do manage to truly eat gluten free, you should expect that many odd little things that you had been living with forever and didn't ever realize were caused by gluten will disappear and many of them will only take a day or two. Other problems will persist or even get worse in which case some other vitamin or mineral deficiency is likely to be to blame.

My personal experience was that probiotics weren't needed. My digestive system was already in balance from that point of view though I don't avoid things like yogurt or raw foods that would add them to my diet naturally. 

But I do suspect that many people feel considerably better right away because they start taking gluten-free multi vitamins as recommended - and if you do have any deficiencies, you could feel the effects of supplements within minutes. 

Don't forget that gluten allergies cause malabsorption/malnutrition and this will continue to be a problem until the damage done to your digestive system has had an opportunity to heal. And until you are 100% gluten free and manage to stay that way long term, you're still not healing and damage is still being done.

 

And though many people actually do suffer from milk, soy, and corn allergies in addition to gluten, this is not the same for everyone and not to be presumed. If you're having problems just going gluten free, you might try eliminating them one at a time. Keeping a food diary seems like a good idea if you suspect that you have additional allergies. 

If you don't have grocery stores in your area that carry a wide variety of gluten-free products, you may need to seek out one that specializes in organic and natural foods in order to find premade foods and vitamins that are gluten free. Your other options are to shop online, have your local grocery store make special orders for you, or to make your own. And no doubt, if you post any sort of question on this forum asking others for thoughts about their favorite gluten-free alternatives, you'll get a response. 

I didn't realize that sleep apnea was also a symptom of gluten allergies. So far as my husband goes, at least, his were all very physical very non-allergy related issues. They had to take cartilage from his ear to help rebuild his nose. Now, now it could be that and/or a weight issue as he has gained a good chunk of weight since that surgery and that hasn't helped any.

 

I could, now, easily believe that gluten issues could have been the culprit with my sons.


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#24 tommysmommy

 
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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:55 PM

Consider vitamins, and if already taking, adjust/increase. The body struggles w/ vitamin-nutrient absorption as you heal. B12 is a wonder drug for me (try to ones tgat melt under your tongue for best absorption) - you may find you have a deficiency in some things. Also, be sure any supplements you take a gluten-free, often a hidden source of gluten
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