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De-Glutening The Kitchen


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#1 laura1959

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:39 AM

My husband does most of the cooking here, due to my chronically low energy levels.  Hopefully, that can change if I start feeling better on the gluten free diet.  

 

I've been talking with him about cross contamination.  We currently have an array of wooden cutting boards that are used for preparing all manner of foods, including meats and salad greens, as well as breads.  Obviously, those are going to have to be de-glutened.  What's the best way?  Or should I just toss them out?  (one is built into the counter so that would be a problem).  

 

Any other advice for avoiding cc?  I'm planning to get all the gluten containing foods out of here over the next few weeks.  Been eating foods myself that are self contained to avoid CC, but I can't eat like that forever.  Will probably buy a new toaster oven (we need one anyway) once I get all the bread out of here and convince hubby not to bring that crap into our home anymore.  He read the book "Wheat Belly" a few months ago and got all gung-ho over not eating wheat for about a week, so maybe it won't be too hard to convince him.  

 

Any other advice?  


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#2 AlwaysLearning

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 01:49 PM

I'd also replace:

• Wooden and plastic utensils such as big spoons, spatulas, etc.

• Collanders and sieves, especially those that are plastic or are woven. If you have a metal collander with big holes, you can probably clean it well enough.

• Non-stick pans. Don't forget the bake ware.

 

Don't forget things like:

• Butter dishes that are made of plastic.

• Storage containers for leftovers, or even the hard plastic in your cupboards that may have held pasta or cereal before being used for rice (meaning the food now stored in them may also be contaminated)

• Have you ever used your ice cube trays to make something other than ice that may have contained gluten?

• The pizza stone must go. 

• Do you have plastic pitchers that may have been used for something that contained gluten?

Basically, if it isn't made of glass or metal (is porous) then it is suspect.

Watch out for hidden sources of gluten. I still haven't gone through all of my teas to sort out those that are gluten free from those that are not, and realize that if open tea bags were stored together, they and the container are contaminated.


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#3 AlwaysLearning

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 01:50 PM

Oh, and can you sand down the built-in cutting board?


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#4 laura1959

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 07:24 PM

Thank you!  


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#5 GottaSki

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:07 PM

Yep...most say toss wood cutting boards and utensils....we did not as we had custom boards built by my hubby many moons ago and utensils crafted by our nephew...we/he sanded...then I washed them within an inch of their lives...then we re-oiled them....never had an issue.

 

Use your best judgement or ask if you have other concerns.

 

Colanders, NonStick Pans or plastic containers with any scratches, toasters, and a few other items need to be tossed.


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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#6 laura1959

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Posted 27 July 2013 - 08:25 PM

I just told my husband about sanding down the one cutting board and he said, "we could do that to all of the wooden ones."  I suppose we could.  Thanks again!  


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#7 Pegleg84

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:45 AM

I also ignored the cutting board and some other things for far too long, and recently replaced them. I don't think I'm using anything at this point that might be ccd. It might be low-level cc, but it builds up. I think I didn't really notice that it might have been a problem until it was gone! So do all your replacing now. Label everything that needs to stay gluten free, and keep some serious segregation of anything gluteny. (consider gluten as special food, not the other way around. If you hubby wants to bring gluten into the house, he needs to be responsible to keeping it completely separate, contained, cleaning, and not making you sick!)

 

That's interesting about sanding and re-oiling the wooden boards/utencils. Very good to know. There's this cutting board at my parents house that we've had forever, and I think it still gets used despite being contaminated with 30+ years of gluten (my mom is Celiac), so I'll mention that it could be sanded.

(also might have to give my mom a lecture on cc and take her kitchen-stuff shopping when I'm home next week. Mom has been gluten-free for 7+ years now, but I don't think the kitchen was ever purged of contaminated kitchen ware, and there doesn't seem to be any dedicated equipment other than the toaster. And I always wonder why I end up getting glutened when I'm home. I'm also much more sensitive than Mom. It makes me wonder whether she might not still be having some problems because of low-level cc that could be avoided).

 

Good luck with everything!


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~ Be a light unto yourself. ~ - The Buddha

- Gluten-free since March 2009 (not officially diagnosed, but most likely Celiac). Symptoms have greatly improved or disappeared since.
- Soy intolerant. Dairy free (likely casein intolerant). Problems with eggs, quinoa, brown rice

- mild gastritis seen on endoscopy Oct 2012. Not sure if healed or not.
- Family members with Celiac: Mother, sister, aunt on mother's side, aunt and uncle on father's side, more being diagnosed every year.


#8 bartfull

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:08 AM

"Basically, if it isn't made of glass or metal (is porous) then it is suspect."

 

Except for cast iron. Cast iron is is pourous so it must be replaced too.

 

As for the cutting boards, if you really want to sand them, make sure you sand them so deeply that ANY cuts are completely gone. Personally I would just buy new ones to use and leave the built-in ones for show. OR buy some of those new thin plastic ones to use on top of the old ones.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#9 laura1959

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:08 AM

I went out and purchased a packet of these at Target:  http://www.webstaura...CFa9eQgodgyYAIg

 

They take up almost no space and I can store them in the original plastic sleeve they came in.  For the time being, they seem to be all I need and they also make great safe surfaces for placing my utensils while cooking.  A fairly low cost solution.  


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#10 notme!

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:50 AM

 

 

Except for cast iron. Cast iron is is pourous so it must be replaced too.

 

we re-seasoned our cast iron and put it in the self cleaning cycle of the oven - the grill grates, he took a blow-torch to and everything seems to be ok.   one of the pans, i don't think we ever cooked anything but eggs in, but we re-did it anyway.  i may have just gotten lucky, but i haven't had a problem so far.  (hopefully not Famous Last Words lolz!)


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arlene

misdiagnosed for 25 years!
just as i was getting my affairs in order to die of malnutrition...
gluten free 7/2010
blood test negative
celiac confirmed by endoscopy 9/2010

 

only YOU can prevent forest fires - smokey t. bear

 

have a nice day :)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator


#11 Adalaide

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    It needs to be about 20% cooler.

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:55 AM

GAH!!! Don't throw away your cast iron! Especially not heirlooms. Even if your oven does not have a self cleaning cycle you can use an oven cleaner on it, one of those that you use on the racks and comes with a bag to put it in. Re-season and you're all set. Just... no accidents. If you gluten it you have to start all over again. One of my very favorite things to shop for for myself when I need a gift is heirloom quality cast iron on ebay or other auction sites. 

 

Or you know... if you have any heirloom quality cast iron and you just aren't comfortable re-seasoning it I'll give you my address!  :lol: 
 


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#12 notme!

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:58 AM

Or you know... if you have any heirloom quality cast iron and you just aren't comfortable re-seasoning it I'll give you my address!  :lol:

 

me too!   B)


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arlene

misdiagnosed for 25 years!
just as i was getting my affairs in order to die of malnutrition...
gluten free 7/2010
blood test negative
celiac confirmed by endoscopy 9/2010

 

only YOU can prevent forest fires - smokey t. bear

 

have a nice day :)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator


#13 bartfull

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:01 AM

Wasn't there a thread a while back about how to re-season cast iron using only a certain kind of oil and doing it in very thin layers several times? I wouldn't think the regular way of reseasoning would work, but what do I know? I used to use cast iron but gave it up a long time ago because it was so HEAVY. I'm a lousy cook anyway. If I can't cook it on the Weber or the "George", I don't cook it.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#14 laura1959

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:02 AM

Sadly, I do not have any vintage cast iron to send to any of you ;)  .  We do have a bunch of coated stuff that is going to have to go away.  Hubby went out and bought a beautiful stainless steel skillet yesterday for me to use to make a stir fry, which was delicious.  


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#15 laura1959

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:04 AM

"Basically, if it isn't made of glass or metal (is porous) then it is suspect."

 

Except for cast iron. Cast iron is is pourous so it must be replaced too.

 

As for the cutting boards, if you really want to sand them, make sure you sand them so deeply that ANY cuts are completely gone. Personally I would just buy new ones to use and leave the built-in ones for show. OR buy some of those new thin plastic ones to use on top of the old ones.

 

This is funny, we were both posting about the thin cutting mats at the same time.  That's exactly what I ended up buying.  


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