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Candida Vs Gluten Intolerance


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#1 Renegade

 
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Posted 28 July 2013 - 01:22 PM

So I've been looking into candida and what it is like, and the symptoms include: Leaky gut,Digestive issues such as bloating, constipation, or diarrhea,food allergies,Fatigue, Strong sugar and refined carbohydrate cravings, Difficulty concentrating, poor memory, lack of focus, ADD, ADHD and brain fog. This all Really seems like the symptoms of gluten intolerance and having look into this it I was thinking I could have it too, now I looked into how to get rid of it.

 

I came to find quite a handful of required diets and they all recommend to cut grains,wheat,rye and carbs and vegetable like sweet potatoes.

 

So basically if I had candida, a lot of the gluten-free good alternative(corn,rice,amarath,sweet potatoes) would worsen your candida  Now this got me quite worried as I have no itchy skin or fungus in my mouth but many things are in tune with how are I feel.

 

I would like to get some more advice on this, because going like this I feel strongly to start a non gluten and anti candida diet, but combining both I would end up eatings nothing but eggs,chickens and salad, it goes as far as cutting out most fruits.

 

It mention how antibiotics is something that usually trigger it but the last time I ever had them was 2 years ago when I had my wisdom teeth removed and I felt totally fine throughout the whole healing process, I did take advils and antihistamine on a daily basis for 2 or 3 years because of allergies,I haven't touch them since 3 months or so when ironically my gluten symptoms started showing up.

 

Any thoughts on this?


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#2 bartfull

 
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Posted 28 July 2013 - 01:40 PM

Give yourself a few months on the gluten-free diet before trying this. Most likely the gluten-free diet will clear up your problems, but if not you can try a candida diet later. By then you will have a clearer idea of which foods bother you (if any besides gluten), and you can tailor your diet to suit your needs and still get enough nutrition.


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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#3 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 28 July 2013 - 03:58 PM

Candida is touted as the "scourge" of everything wrong when someone has gut issues by alternative med practitioners. (I know, they told me I had it too--I did not). 

 

Do you have an obvious yeast infection??...i.e. a white, thick, icky discharge from your vagina and in your mouth?

 

If not, you do not have Candida Albicans.

 

"systemic yeast overgrowth" is often cited as why people are sick, but honestly, it is a serious, deadly condition and if you had it,

you would be hooked up to IVs and very, very ill.

 

one question....do you have celiac? when were you diagnosed?

Give it time... please, just be patient and allow your gut to heal before you start thinking everything else is the cause of your problems. Trust me on this one.


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#4 AlwaysLearning

 
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Posted 28 July 2013 - 05:15 PM

I wouldn't jump on the yeast band wagon too easily. Yeast is a natural part of the body's flora. It is supposed to be there. I agree 100% with the previous poster that if your yeast levels were out of balance - you'd know it without a doubt.

"Leaky gut" is also controversial but when I researched it, all I found was personal anecdotes without any scientific evidence that it even exists despite its prevalence as a term in content on the internet. As far as I know, it hasn't made it past the point of theory yet despite plenty of scientific research trying to prove its existence. There are normally other explanations for just about every problem that is attributed to leaky gut, and though I personally haven't ruled it out completely, I'm guessing that it is nowhere near as common as some would have you believe, and not necessarily in the way that it is currently described.

Though studies have proven that those who have taken antibiotics are also more likely to have celiac, there is no proof that antibiotics cause celiac vs. those who have celiac being more likely to acquire an illness that requires antibiotics. It is, after all, an autoimmune disease that causes the sinuses to become inflamed.

I think it is great that you are doing tons of research in hopes of finding answers because that is probably the only way that you'll stumble upon those that will eventually help you, but I'd recommend trying to limit your expectations on finding an immediate answer, or an easy one. 

And after seeing your posts in several threads, probably the best advice I can offer is to try being really diligent about your own experience so that you can start identifying patterns. Rather than trying to eliminate all foods, you could try cycling through a few while keeping a detailed food diary that not only records what you are eating and drinking, but also how you felt and how it came out the other end. Yes, that means checking the toilet bowl for color, size, and shape and figuring out how what got put in came out again and how it made you feel during transit. 

If you really want to eat an extremely-restrictive diet to try to eliminate all suspect foods at once, I suppose if you had enough will power, that could work. I know that I wouldn't be able to hack it. But you could also consider a longer-term approach where you eliminate single types or similar types together, or do an additive process where you start by eliminating one then add another, each for several weeks at a time. It would be a ton easier and less stressful.

And don't overlook fiber content, dehydration, and deficiences as factors that can contribute to digestive problems, especially if you've severely limited variety in your diet. If just one of those foods that you're now eating ever day is causing problems (such as being too low in fiber and slowing your system down to a crawl), it could really screw up your attempts to find answers.


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