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#31 AlwaysLearning

 
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Posted 07 August 2013 - 04:04 PM

Okay, back to the original topic.

One, I think that it is absolutely fantastic that you are here on the forum asking for tips because you want to do better. Kudos for that.

I'm only nine months in myself so I'm still struggling with a lot of the social aspects. How can I start dating again now that I feel better when restaurants and bars are pretty much off the table?

But here are a couple little things that I think I've got going for me.

• I still have one restaurant that I can go to that doesn't gluten me. Mine is sushi and I'm careful about what I order, but it really does help that the prep area is mainly handling fish, rice, and veggies, and not much else. I'd find that one restaurant that you can still go to and when social activities do arise, know that you have a safe haven if needed.

• I really enjoy cooking and having fewer options out has really upped my game. I have rules for myself when grocery shopping, like try one new thing every time, that help me add new favorite dishes to my repetoire.

 

• I know that if I want to be sociable, I can always invite friends over. Though I can't drink any beer or food that they may bring, I can definitely eat and drink my own ... and not have to carry it with me.

• I know that weeknights are much more difficult to find things to do that don't include bars or restaurants.  There are simply fewer options available. But they do still exist. My neighborhood has art galleries, readings at the bookstore, free outdoor concerts, and they don't require that you eat or drink while you are there, though you can still bring your own. And I personally don't think it is very difficult to sneak food or drinks into a movie theater if you want to avoid the hassle of having to explain that they have to allow you your own food. Would save money too. Or track down an old drive-in theater and make out instead!

• Okay, sporting events are probably always going to suck. No food and limited drink options available and not allowed to bring your own in. Sorry. It may be time to start campaigning to get them to sell at least one gluten-free beer.

• Weekends are easier, events that take place during the day, more outdoor activities where bringing your own picnic is easy. Be a tourist in your own city.

• Exercise doesn't require a gluten-free menu so walking, hiking, biking, kayaking, etc. are all still on your "can do" list. 

 

• Tap into the internet to find people whose lifestyles match with activities that are easier for you. Try Meet Up or just track down activities of interest online. Take a class together. Go to a wine tasting at a winery. Check out the museums.

Basically, add more interesting activities to your life that aren't the same old go-out-to-eat-or-drink routine. It is highly likely that your friends will want to join you! Just ask them. Or share all the pictures of your great adventures on facebook so that they are jealous!!!
 


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#32 notme!

 
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Posted 07 August 2013 - 04:43 PM

You know what's in plastic? PLASTIC! You want to go to the bar and get a drink but he's worried about gluten hands touching the straw? Easy fix.............................. bring his own. Better yet, go get one of those "Krazy Straws" and bring it with him. He'll be the life of the party. Hell, I'd probably buy a round just to watch. :wacko:

 

Coffee is over rated. It keeps you awake sometimes, makes you jumpy (like the stressed out dwarf) and stains your teeth. Just kidding, I drink about 4 gallons a week and there is nothing wrong with me.

 

 

 

Right honey? :wub:

negative, starfighter.  return to base.  eagle.  over.

 

haha - i was just telling nate about 'jumpy'  :D

 

whoever had the cooking together idea:  how could i forget that one??!!  we do it all the time  :)  it's one of our favorites!   also, we go out if we want to, to bars and such - we have a plan a and a plan b - i am constantly making new friends and getting them to let me (bring my own beer in or sneak food in or a cooler or whatever) do what i want.  we went to bristol motor speedway and the skybox caterers ordered me so much redbridge, i had to sneak the rest OUT - lolz - it''s always an adventure  :P  on that trip, i made friends with one of the track officials, so this year i'm going to call him so i can sneak my own stuff in ;)  and we have people over to the house all the time and they eat gluten free (maybe i let them have bread haha) i usually just keep my stuff separate/take mine out first before dishes get cc'd.  

 

if he is nervous about the bartender's hands, just bring your own straws and proclaim them special.  big wink and a smile to the bartender  ;D  you're hanging out with a bunch of people who are *drinking* - chances are it won't be the wierdest thing they have seen as the night progresses.  good luck :)  and if you want some good pointers, read the newbie 101 thread


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arlene

misdiagnosed for 25 years!
just as i was getting my affairs in order to die of malnutrition...
gluten free 7/2010
blood test negative
celiac confirmed by endoscopy 9/2010

 

only YOU can prevent forest fires - smokey t. bear

 

have a nice day :)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator


#33 Adalaide

 
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Posted 07 August 2013 - 08:12 PM

AliveAndWell, I think others will back me up on this: I have been very supportive of most every person I have ever posted to. I am always ready to give the benefit of the doubt to people and have gone out of my way to explain things when someone was having a hard time understanding. But if you had read the OP's first post BEFORE she had edited it you would have seen that her concern came across as not so much for her boyfriend, but for herself.

 

You can also see that she seems to have rejected the good advice she was given from other posters about things they could do together. Then she claims that because he works day shift and she usually works nights, there isn't TIME to do these things together.

 

It sounds to me like she is looking for an excuse to break up with him. Blaming it on his celiac disease is one way of not admitting that she just doesn't want to be with him.

 

We celiacs have enough to deal with without someone using OUR disease as a way to weasel out of dealing with hard truths.

 

Seriously. The OP when it was first written was basically "my relationship is SO BORING because we NEVER do anything EVER..... WAAAAAAAAA" and sounded pretty much like the only concern in the world was about how positively droll her life was.

 

There was plenty of information shared before she came back with the fact that it is difficult to find time to do things together. Maybe he doesn't want to go out because he's worried about all sorts of things he doesn't need to be worried about, in which case he should get valid information. Maybe he's just a homebody in which case they simply aren't suited to each other. Maybe the schedules are a problem. We don't know, but at this point I think we've mostly exhausted all the help we can offer, especially after her changing her entire post from "poor me" to "I'd like to be supportive."


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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#34 GottaSki

 
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Posted 07 August 2013 - 08:48 PM

Hi Tiny!

You mention quite a few episodes of CC during your time together....how long would you say you and your guy tightened down on being careful. He may still be healing if these episodes were very regular for a significant amount of time.

For now you have been given at least twenty activities that do not involve dining/drinking out...but if you really want to do those two things....how about a good cup of coffee with raw sugar or at the bar...gluten free beer or share a nice bottle of wine?

Does your man especially enjoy something you make? If so...throw a serving of that in an insulated bag and head to a nice restaurant....I take enjoyment from my hubs enjoying a nice meal out as long as I bring my food along so I have something safe to eat.

Bottom line...is it doesn't sound like he is feeling great yet...this may not be celiafunk....simply celiac trying to catch up....my guess is he would prefer having fun to feeling like shit.

I'm glad you stopped by...feel free and hang out...always nice to meet another significant other ... we have some pretty great ones around here.
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-Lisa

Undiagnosed Celiac Disease ~ 43 years

3/26/09 gluten-free - dignosed celiac - blood 3/3/09, biopsy 3/26/09, double DQ2 / single DQ8 positive

10/25/13 - MCAD

Health history since celiac diagnosis became too long -- moved to the "about me" section of my profile

My children and I all have multiple copies of the genes for Celiac Disease, along with large variety of symptoms/resolution gluten-free

Current tally from me, three kids and two grands: 4 diagnosed with Celiac Disease, 2 NCGS

Get PROPERLY tested BEFORE REMOVING GLUTEN.

ALWAYS independently research health related information found on internet forums/blogs.

"LTES" a Gem :)


#35 tinydani

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 12:22 AM

AliveAndWell, I think others will back me up on this: I have been very supportive of most every person I have ever posted to. I am always ready to give the benefit of the doubt to people and have gone out of my way to explain things when someone was having a hard time understanding. But if you had read the OP's first post BEFORE she had edited it you would have seen that her concern came across as not so much for her boyfriend, but for herself.

 

You can also see that she seems to have rejected the good advice she was given from other posters about things they could do together. Then she claims that because he works day shift and she usually works nights, there isn't TIME to do these things together.

 

It sounds to me like she is looking for an excuse to break up with him. Blaming it on his celiac disease is one way of not admitting that she just doesn't want to be with him.

 

We celiacs have enough to deal with without someone using OUR disease as a way to weasel out of dealing with hard truths.

I think everything you have said is pretty stupid. and everyone else agreeing with you. i am not looking to break up with him did it ever occur to you i just wanted some advice and i got some great tips and advice and i am taking the good advice but i think you have deep abandonment issues and you shouldnt assume everyone is a piece of shit who doesnt have celiac disease. and i know its difficult for me sometimes to deal with this so i can only imagine how difficult it is for someone who actually has the disease. I see the way it affects him when he gets sick, he is very disoriented in his thought processes and he cant eat after he has been sick so he is hungry and his body is exhausted I have seen what it is like and the damage it has done to his body and because i care about him i have changed my habits and diet so he doesnt have to go through that nearly as much as he used to.

 

 

I legitimately never meant to offend anyone or anything of that nature, i am simply a person in love with someone who has celiac disease and i am now seeing the complete lifestyle of a celiac because now we live together.

And now im justifying my relationship and my morals to a complete stranger, kind of a jerk of a stranger so high five. we all got problems.

lets all just stop

stop saying anything further

i got the advice i wanted

so thank you to those with the good positive vibes and good feedback

other than that

stop


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#36 surviormom

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 05:56 AM

I think everyone has made great suggestions.  He may still be feeling bad due to healing.  My husband eats what I do here at home.  When we go out we go to places that we know, I can have a gluten-free menu, or I can have good seafood/sushi or salad.  Movies, Art shows, just walk and talk and hold hands is fun, boating, wave runners are a blast, there are any number of things you can do that do not include food that will harm you, but a big thing is learning what will harm you, and doing it together is a great thing.  My husband has done his share of reading.  And I was a great cook before, or have been told so, and I just had to learn to cook/bake all over again, my husband helps he is my sampler.  He tells me if its good.  He is willing to have a gluten-free birthday cake this year so I can enjoy cake with him.  He trusts my baking skills again.   :lol: So we have fun, in fact we have even more fun making fun of my body than ever before.  Before he made fun of things I had going on and I would get mad, now I can laugh too, I know what is going on most of the time, understand it, and am trying to heal it.

 

I feel better and more energetic than I have since kids, and I am still healing, who knows how I will feel healed.  

 

One thing no one has mentioned or I did not notice, what about his vitamin levels, could he be deficient and lacking in energy still?  The vitamin supplements, have helped me quite a bit.  I did not know how deficient I was.

 

Hang in there if you really want a future with this man.  It is not that difficult and it does not cause that much trouble.  Its a lot less trouble than eating the bad foods and having a problem with them.....Good Luck.


  • 0

Gluten Free 2012 - Dairy Free 2012 - Acid Reflux Diet 2013

Chronic Gastritis 2013 - Peptic Duodenitis 2013 - Hiatal Hernia 2013 - C-Diff 2013 - Endometriosis 2013 - Uterine Fibroids 2013

Patellar Tendonitis 2013 - Arthritis 2014 - NCGI 2014 - Erosive Esophagitis 2014 - Barretts 2014


I have a long list of physical ailments that were being grouped into age/gender by doctors.

Began Gluten Free and Casein Free after an Allergy Test trying to find answers to health problems that the doctors just were not answering well enough. Looking back through history, I have a lifetime of allergies and gastro issues.


Learn from yesterday, Live for today, and Hope for tomorrow. The important thing is not to stop questioning.

Albert Einstein

#37 Gemini

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 06:54 AM

I think everything you have said is pretty stupid. and everyone else agreeing with you. i am not looking to break up with him did it ever occur to you i just wanted some advice and i got some great tips and advice and i am taking the good advice but i think you have deep abandonment issues and you shouldnt assume everyone is a piece of shit who doesnt have celiac disease. and i know its difficult for me sometimes to deal with this so i can only imagine how difficult it is for someone who actually has the disease. I see the way it affects him when he gets sick, he is very disoriented in his thought processes and he cant eat after he has been sick so he is hungry and his body is exhausted I have seen what it is like and the damage it has done to his body and because i care about him i have changed my habits and diet so he doesnt have to go through that nearly as much as he used to.

 

 

I legitimately never meant to offend anyone or anything of that nature, i am simply a person in love with someone who has celiac disease and i am now seeing the complete lifestyle of a celiac because now we live together.

And now im justifying my relationship and my morals to a complete stranger, kind of a jerk of a stranger so high five. we all got problems.

lets all just stop

stop saying anything further

i got the advice i wanted

so thank you to those with the good positive vibes and good feedback

other than that

stop

I think it is time you stopped the name calling and grow up.  You are whining and what Bartie said is true and spot on.  This is a great support group for those who are willing to take constructive criticism when needed.  We have a society who refuses to accept responsibility for their behavior and act like adults and you appear to be one of them. 

 

My husband went gluten-free for me and then discovered that he may have a gluten issue himself.  We are both gluten-free and have been doing this for awhile.  Even when I was first diagnosed, I never behaved like you are now.  I was actually overjoyed that I had a diagnosis and never once felt that this lifestyle was too hard to deal with.  Sickness is hard to deal with...not eating and living gluten free.  Ditto for the husband......he doesn't whine that we can't go out to eat a lot and actually took up cooking and we do cook together.  It is a wonderful thing for a truly supportive relationship.  We find plenty to do together that does not involve food.  Maybe someday when you grow up, you'll get there also.  But as for us being stupid......that is downright laughable.

Educating yourself on Celiac is stupid?  Try to re-direct your mindset because I am embarrassed for you when I read this nonsense.


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#38 0range

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 07:17 AM

Okay, back to the original topic.

One, I think that it is absolutely fantastic that you are here on the forum asking for tips because you want to do better. Kudos for that.

I'm only nine months in myself so I'm still struggling with a lot of the social aspects. How can I start dating again now that I feel better when restaurants and bars are pretty much off the table?

But here are a couple little things that I think I've got going for me.

• I still have one restaurant that I can go to that doesn't gluten me. Mine is sushi and I'm careful about what I order, but it really does help that the prep area is mainly handling fish, rice, and veggies, and not much else. I'd find that one restaurant that you can still go to and when social activities do arise, know that you have a safe haven if needed.

• I really enjoy cooking and having fewer options out has really upped my game. I have rules for myself when grocery shopping, like try one new thing every time, that help me add new favorite dishes to my repetoire.

 

• I know that if I want to be sociable, I can always invite friends over. Though I can't drink any beer or food that they may bring, I can definitely eat and drink my own ... and not have to carry it with me.

• I know that weeknights are much more difficult to find things to do that don't include bars or restaurants.  There are simply fewer options available. But they do still exist. My neighborhood has art galleries, readings at the bookstore, free outdoor concerts, and they don't require that you eat or drink while you are there, though you can still bring your own. And I personally don't think it is very difficult to sneak food or drinks into a movie theater if you want to avoid the hassle of having to explain that they have to allow you your own food. Would save money too. Or track down an old drive-in theater and make out instead!

• Okay, sporting events are probably always going to suck. No food and limited drink options available and not allowed to bring your own in. Sorry. It may be time to start campaigning to get them to sell at least one gluten-free beer.

• Weekends are easier, events that take place during the day, more outdoor activities where bringing your own picnic is easy. Be a tourist in your own city.

• Exercise doesn't require a gluten-free menu so walking, hiking, biking, kayaking, etc. are all still on your "can do" list. 

 

• Tap into the internet to find people whose lifestyles match with activities that are easier for you. Try Meet Up or just track down activities of interest online. Take a class together. Go to a wine tasting at a winery. Check out the museums.

Basically, add more interesting activities to your life that aren't the same old go-out-to-eat-or-drink routine. It is highly likely that your friends will want to join you! Just ask them. Or share all the pictures of your great adventures on facebook so that they are jealous!!!
 

 

So many excellent tips! I have to +1 exercise. Especially canoeing (I'm being biased...). It releases endorphins (so makes you happy) so theres that too! 


  • 0

Canadian undergraduate student in 3rd year, studying Psychology and Speech Communication. Hoping to go into rehabilitation sciences!  B)

  

Dx with: 

Hashimoto's thyroiditis - 22/09/12

benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (bppv) - 18/05/13

irritable bowel syndrome - 21/06/13 

HLA-DQ8 gene ~ heterozygous (moderate risk for celiac) - 29/11/13

 

-> underwent a colonoscopy on 24/08/13, showed mild focal colitis + lymphoid hyperplasia (aka inflammation) in terminal ileum


#39 bartfull

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 08:04 AM

"I think everything you have said is pretty stupid. and everyone else agreeing with you. i am not looking to break up with him did it ever occur to you i just wanted some advice and i got some great tips and advice and i am taking the good advice but i think you have deep abandonment issues and you shouldnt assume everyone is a piece of shit who doesnt have celiac disease. and i know its difficult for me sometimes to deal with this so i can only imagine how difficult it is for someone who actually has the disease. I see the way it affects him when he gets sick, he is very disoriented in his thought processes and he cant eat after he has been sick so he is hungry and his body is exhausted I have seen what it is like and the damage it has done to his body and because i care about him i have changed my habits and diet so he doesnt have to go through that nearly as much as he used to.





I legitimately never meant to offend anyone or anything of that nature, i am simply a person in love with someone who has celiac disease and i am now seeing the complete lifestyle of a celiac because now we live together.

And now im justifying my relationship and my morals to a complete stranger, kind of a jerk of a stranger so high five. we all got problems.

lets all just stop

stop saying anything further

i got the advice i wanted

so thank you to those with the good positive vibes and good feedback

other than that

stop"

Nope. No abandonment issues here, but I have read so many posts about others whose spouses, parents, children or friends don't take celiac seriosly. And from what you said about asthma and celiac not being equal in seriousness, it's obvious you don't take it seriously either. Asthma can kill. I know, I lost my father to asthma. Celiac can kill. I lost my mother to celiac. Asthma kills quickly. Celiac kills slowly and torturously. Ask some of the other posters here who nearly died from the complications.

Also, you say he has had celiac for four years and you have been in a relationship with him for a year and 1/2. Are you saying he went two and 1/2 to three years NOT sticking to the diet, even though it gives him the terrible symptoms you describe? I think it's more likely that he was taking care of his health but when he started dating you he wanted to please you by going out to restaurants and bars, then found out it was making him sick so he put a stop to it. I think it's very possible that your constant CC'ing until recently (that's what you said) has made him afraid of YOU.

It's obvious from your language that you are very young. The newness has worn off of this relationship and now you're bored with him. This post I quoted is the first time you have mentioned the words love or caring rather than boring and "I can't take it". You come across as LOVING good times and CARING about yourself.

YOU stop. Stop the foul language. Stop the selfeshness. IF you care about him, let him take care of his health, implement the suggestions you have been given (unless of course your ONLY idea of fun is bars and restaurants rather than museums, zoos, outdoor activities, etc.), and stop making excuses.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#40 notme!

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 08:36 AM

barty, everybody has to begin somewhere.   i don't know if i would be able to stick to this lifestyle if i was young and dating!   remember, this disease, left untreated, gets progressively worse.  maybe 4-5 years ago, not so much damage, you can still ignore it.  fast fwd a few years, (more damage) it's a huge issue.  huger than your young self thought and it scares you into staying home.  it is then it affects your relationship, who met you while you when you were still in denial.........  (cheap reference to my s/n:  who has celiac???  notme!!!! lolz)  


  • 0

arlene

misdiagnosed for 25 years!
just as i was getting my affairs in order to die of malnutrition...
gluten free 7/2010
blood test negative
celiac confirmed by endoscopy 9/2010

 

only YOU can prevent forest fires - smokey t. bear

 

have a nice day :)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator


#41 dotsdots

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 08:55 AM

I have trouble getting my husband to go anywhere, and he's not the one with celiac disease!

 

Is there a support group where you guys live that you could go to together? A physical one, where you meet people in person rather than just online. (Although online support is great - it's why I'm here!) Other couples might be going through the same thing and you could connect with them and see how they handle this. Sometimes it's nice to know that you're not all alone. It still would not be entirely "normal", as it would be celiac focused, but it might show your significant other that going out for a drink or coffee can work out. And you might find an activity to enjoy together that you haven't thought of yet. 

 

Just a thought - good luck to you. 


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#42 needsomeadvice

 
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Posted 08 August 2013 - 09:32 AM

Its disheartening to hear this from a s/o but totally understandable.

I can't imagine the level of frustartion and annoyance from someone not celiac or gluten intolerant.

I liken it to dating or being married to a recovering alcoholic maybe, but still wanting to drink and socialize in bars, etc.

I guess the real heart of the matter here is if you care about him enough to make the sacrfices and lifestyle changes necessary to keep him healthy. If not, then don't waste each others time. Sounds blunt but its the truth.

 

I know from expereince with my daughter, that she is not willing to do this and has told me on numerous occassions how annoying and aggravating my condition is.

oh my god that is so terrible.  I just had to reply to this to say I'm sorry to hear that :(  I know my ex boyfriend's family didn't understand it at ALL and would call me anorexic because of it! How heartless.  Makes me sad people can be so cold.


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#43 NateJ

 
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Posted 10 August 2013 - 05:20 AM

oh my god that is so terrible.  I just had to reply to this to say I'm sorry to hear that :(  I know my ex boyfriend's family didn't understand it at ALL and would call me anorexic because of it! How heartless.  Makes me sad people can be so cold.


I've learned to cope with the attitude.
It's one of the reasons I'm not married anymore and
for some people it's just to much to sacrifice.
Which was my original point to my post. You either love the person enough to make the
Sacrifices to keep them healthy or you don't. Be it spouse, friend, sibling,
Or offspring. I can count on one hand the number of friends I have left. But what's
The alternative? Being horribly sick all the time?
No thanks. I have enough health problems without adding to it
  • 2

#44 Chrisz1000

 
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Posted 12 August 2013 - 11:27 PM

Hi Tinydani,

 

My first post here (regular reader though) and I feel compelled to respond as I was once in that terrible place where your boyfriend is right now. I’m of a similar age to you (25), male so feel I can relate to your story.

 

You’ve had a lot of stick so far so I come here hoping to reassure and help - based on my story and what I have understood of yours. I am almost 5 months gluten free, not long in terms of this Disease and recovery, but I have already been through what your boyfriend seems going through now – or at least I had a similar mindset at one point in my recovery.

 

I was in a rut, still am to an extent, where Coeliac’s physical and mental symptoms consumed my life. The mental symptoms had the most devastating impact on my life.

 

I will explain, bear with me.

 

My brain compartmentalised the day into 4 basic tasks – eat, work, rest, sleep. My mind did its best to avoid anything that deviated from these tasks. So for instance, when I had returned home from work I would eat my food; thereafter I concentrated on rest and then sleep. If my fiancé wanted to go out, have fun - do anything – I would oblige but would be stubborn and moody whilst doing whatever it was she wanted to put me through J . I wanted to rest and rest only. I would not socialise or even wish to pick up the phone to call friends/relatives because this would interrupt my rest time – so that took spontaneity out of our lifestyle.

 

Making plans was also a problem because firstly, it takes energy to think and plan tasks and secondly, the plan will end up deviating me from eat, rest, work or sleep. So planning day-outs was a problem too!! Does this sound familiar to you?

 

The disease consumed me – I would track my weight, my symptoms, everything I ate. I would have graphs, charts and stats and take weight readings every day. This is all part of the depression and anxiety that Coeliac disease gave me. I would distrust any “gluten-free” restaurant and I was terrified about cross contamination in a similar way to your boyfriend – although not as far as believing gluten is on all packaging!

 

Check out the ‘behaviour’ room on this website. There are lots of people who express what they feel better than I have. Their accounts are also similar to your BF’s.

 

It will be hard for you to see the invisible symptoms your boyfriend is suffering – the depression, anxiety, brain fog, fear. But he needs your loving support for his head won’t be in the right place. For me, a hard talking to by my fiancé snapped me out of it – she told me I was becoming consumed and it was making her sad. I didn’t want to make her sad so I concentrated all my energy into finding a way out. She told me because she loved me and knew I needed a good talking to! She was harsh, but I knew from all her support that she had been giving me that I needed to do something too.

 

It will get easier the longer he goes without a glutening. . The depression lifts the longer you are without gluten. For me its about 3 weeks. It didn’t come easy. At first I was still tired though, and my head was full of dark thoughts and I was a recluse. I looked into it and found that I was B12 deficient – I took some B12 mouth spray and drank Lacto-free full fat milk (full of B12). I had instant energy. With energy, I wanted to use it and do stuff. So I slowly started turning my life around and became a happier person. My fiancée and I eat out at least once a week, we do things. I see friends and don’t mind phoning people now. My eat, work, rest and sleep compartmental-isms are still there but mixed in is socialise, exercise and all sorts.

 

Is your boyfriend still getting ‘glutened’ do you know? If not he should be improving after 4 years so get his nutrient levels checked. Anemia or B12, folate, Vitamin D deficiencies can cause the behaviour you are describing as can adrenal gland and thyroid problems. If he is still having accidents then you can expect him to be a recluse and have ‘head’ problems – you need to understand that he has to recharge and gain positive energy before embarking on ‘normal’ things. You will know whether or not you are willing to afford him your energy to help him through.

 

Not to mention, you may be suffering deficiencies on your new gluten free diet which may be making you a bit blue?


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#45 notme!

 
notme!

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 08:05 AM

thank you so much for posting this, chrisz - it sure helps to see the other side of the picture :)  and some great advice that is unique to the situation - you have the perspective that we do not, awesomely helpful -  glad you are feeling better!   


  • 1

arlene

misdiagnosed for 25 years!
just as i was getting my affairs in order to die of malnutrition...
gluten free 7/2010
blood test negative
celiac confirmed by endoscopy 9/2010

 

only YOU can prevent forest fires - smokey t. bear

 

have a nice day :)

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