Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

Unable To Cry


  • Please log in to reply

31 replies to this topic

#1 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,220 posts
 

Posted 12 August 2013 - 06:39 PM

Having gone through decades of celiac, realizing the problem and than trying to adjust to gluten free life, I have had plenty of reasons to cry.  BUT I CAN'T.


  • 0

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 mommy2krj

 
mommy2krj

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 241 posts
 

Posted 12 August 2013 - 07:46 PM

You can't because you're physically unable to? Or because it just won't happen?

 

If it's the former....there is at least one medical condition that I've heard of but can't tell you off the top of my head so I would put a call (yes, I know, ANOTHER call to the doctor) in to your regular doc and explain that to them.

 

If it's the latter....well.....I'm not sure what to tell you. Maybe you're simply not ready for that yet? Or, maybe some part of your brain is just relieved and doesn't feel the need to cry any longer? The brain is a funny, funny thing. :)

Hugs. I think I've cried enough for a couple people and I am new to this journey and am not even the one fully making it. Of course, that is probably why I've cried so much. I find it easier to cry for or about or whatever for my kids, than I do for things for myself.


  • 0

#3 AlwaysLearning

 
AlwaysLearning

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 192 posts
 

Posted 12 August 2013 - 08:56 PM

I know I will sometimes put off "dealing" with emotions soon after the event that triggers them, but am hit by them later, when I've gotten a little distance and they aren't so overwhelming. It is a defense mechanism  and personally, I think an extremely effective one. Much better than what I've seen others do when faced with adversity such as not eating, becoming alcoholics, or turning to drugs. The old adage about time healing all wounds (though they may still leave a scar) seems to hold true, at least in my experience.

Or it could be that you're just in a neutral zone right now, having some difficulties switching things around as you give up some things that you had taken for granted, but also knowing that your diagnosis is a REALLY good thing. Balanced.

But I do hope that you never need to cry because you start to  feel more optimistic. I can't tell you how excited I was to finally figure out my mystery. And having all sorts of odd maladies suddenly disappear or start to improve is a huge success. 

 


  • 0

#4 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,220 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 03:28 AM

I recall standing in the parking lot of a hospital years ago.  I was pregnant and dehydrated.  I was 1000 miles from family and friends.  Except my young husband  that was undergoing intensive training for his new job.  I cried out and made noise, but that time, no tears would come.  I walked into the hospital sullen and quiet.  I found out since that no tears will come when one is dehydrated.  Anyway, I get a similar feeling now when I feel like crying.  Like my eyes fill, but that is all.  Perhaps there is no energy to cry.
 

 

Once I had a friend crying on my shoulder as she was leaving.  I patted her on the back, felt like crying, but no.    Sometimes it would get my points across much better than a million words. Imagine breaking into noisy tears when someone told you are obsessed with diet.   They actually might realize how much it hurt!

 

I think it is physical.  The reason being that the doctor told me that I am having trouble to get the nutrients I need for lack of cortisol from the adrenal glands.  Without cortisol, one can't handle stress. Anyway, so I think we are already working on it.

 

Do I need drugs?  I think not.  Firstly drugs give me terrible side effects.  Second off I actually have real struggles, real reasons to be sad.  Drugs are not for going through a hard time.  This simply needs more time to be overcome.  If I could just let people think what they will without my feeling bad about it.  If I didn't forget that this is only momentary and light compared to what is ahead for me.  If only, but it is tough.

 

I only wanted to know if anyone has ever felt this way and if it resolved or didn't.  You can PM me if you don't care to present publicly   In fact, I tried to submit this anonymously, but failed.  I tried to erase it, but the title still stayed, so I went with it anyway. 

 

I wish I could hang around today and see if anything interesting comes out, but I am off for the day to meet with my health advisor 3 hours away.


  • 0

#5 GFinDC

 
GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,160 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 04:39 AM

I always thot it was good when the women folk weren't crying.  Might just be my male perspective tho...  Maybe you could give other women classes in not crying?  Probably some men out there would pay to send their wives to your classes.  Where's the little devil face mote?   :ph34r:  :)


  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#6 kareng

 
kareng

    HO! HO! HO!

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,312 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 06:10 AM

Honestly, D, I don't think it is physical.  You have a lot of kids and have spent so much time being strong for them (including when you were pregnant) that you have learned how not to cry.  You are taking care of everyone else.  Doing that isn't bad.  It may be more of a typical "man" response to a situation but I don't think its odd.

 

I find myself doing the same thing my whole life.  It always seems like someone needs me to be the strong one.  Even as a kid, if there was a death in the family - someone needs to remind the boys to comb their hair after their shower, set out a serving fork for the ham, walk the dog, make the coffee, etc.  While others are crying or sitting like a lump or reminiscing  - no time to cry.

 

Also, like you said - too much to do today to try to cry.  Nice day for a 3 hour drive and a picnic.  Got to the bank and straighten out some stuff with my mom's name on it and the death certificate. 

 

 

You may find some stupid TV commercial or your first grandchild will make you cry sometime in the future.

 

I don't talk about stuff like this here or in person much.  But I think this is a safe place to sometimes spill stuff.  Our  families won't see it and feel bad.


  • 0

santa-dance.gif

 

Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice. - Dave Barry
 
“The main reason Santa is so jolly is because he knows where all the bad girls live.”  - George Carlin
 
“One can never have enough socks," said Dumbledore. "Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn't get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.”  - J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone
 
 
 
 
 

 


#7 kareng

 
kareng

    HO! HO! HO!

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,312 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 06:11 AM

I always thot it was good when the women folk weren't crying.  Might just be my male perspective tho...  Maybe you could give other women classes in not crying?  Probably some men out there would pay to send their wives to your classes.  Where's the little devil face mote?   :ph34r:  :)

 

 

I can see you are one of those guys that wants to fix it for the crying ladies.  :wub:

Sometimes there is nothing to fix and that drives you guys nuts!  But women find it very sweet. 


  • 0

santa-dance.gif

 

Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice. - Dave Barry
 
“The main reason Santa is so jolly is because he knows where all the bad girls live.”  - George Carlin
 
“One can never have enough socks," said Dumbledore. "Another Christmas has come and gone and I didn't get a single pair. People will insist on giving me books.”  - J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and The Sorcerer's Stone
 
 
 
 
 

 


#8 AlwaysLearning

 
AlwaysLearning

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 192 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 03:41 PM

I've read that having celiac and sjogren's syndrome isn't uncommon. Have you ever looked into that?


  • 0

#9 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,220 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 06:58 PM

I always thot it was good when the women folk weren't crying.  Might just be my male perspective tho...  Maybe you could give other women classes in not crying?  Probably some men out there would pay to send their wives to your classes.  Where's the little devil face mote?   :ph34r:  :)

D's steps to avoid crying:

 

1. Have untreated celiac for decades.

2.  Have the saddest thing happen  to you.  In my case a miscarriage in 1987.

3.  Keep going through life

 

Somehow, I don't think this will fit all!


  • 0

#10 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,220 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 06:58 PM

I've read that having celiac and sjogren's syndrome isn't uncommon. Have you ever looked into that?

No, I haven't, but I will check on it.

 

Hmmm this sounds like a possibility:  First click took me to Mayo Clinic's definition.

 

bg_enewsletter.png

close windownewsletterthumb.jpg Mayo Clinic Housecall Stay up to date on the latest health information. What you get
  • Free weekly e-newsletter
  • Mayo Clinic expertise
  • Recipes, tools and other helpful information
  • We do not share your e-mail address
Definition By Mayo Clinic staff

Sjogren's (SHOW-grins) syndrome is a disorder of your immune system identified by its two most common symptoms — dry eyes and a dry mouth.

Sjogren's syndrome often accompanies other immune-system disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. In Sjogren's syndrome, the mucous membranes and moisture-secreting glands of your eyes and mouth are usually affected first — resulting in decreased production of tears and saliva.

Although you can develop Sjogren's syndrome at any age, most people are older than 40 at the time of diagnosis. The condition is much more common in women. Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms, which often subside with time.

 

 

I don't seem to have any shortage of saliva, though.  Then again perhaps it is part of my water craving occasions?


  • 0

#11 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,220 posts
 

Posted 13 August 2013 - 07:00 PM

Honestly, D, I don't think it is physical.  You have a lot of kids and have spent so much time being strong for them (including when you were pregnant) that you have learned how not to cry.  You are taking care of everyone else.  Doing that isn't bad.  It may be more of a typical "man" response to a situation but I don't think its odd.

 

I find myself doing the same thing my whole life.  It always seems like someone needs me to be the strong one.  Even as a kid, if there was a death in the family - someone needs to remind the boys to comb their hair after their shower, set out a serving fork for the ham, walk the dog, make the coffee, etc.  While others are crying or sitting like a lump or reminiscing  - no time to cry.

 

Also, like you said - too much to do today to try to cry.  Nice day for a 3 hour drive and a picnic.  Got to the bank and straighten out some stuff with my mom's name on it and the death certificate. 

 

 

You may find some stupid TV commercial or your first grandchild will make you cry sometime in the future.

 

I don't talk about stuff like this here or in person much.  But I think this is a safe place to sometimes spill stuff.  Our  families won't see it and feel bad.

 

Perhaps the miscarriage needed a strong release of tears and nothing has seemed so sad since.


  • 0

#12 GFinDC

 
GFinDC

    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,160 posts
 

Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:33 PM

D's steps to avoid crying:

 

1. Have untreated celiac for decades.

2.  Have the saddest thing happen  to you.  In my case a miscarriage in 1987.

3.  Keep going through life

 

Somehow, I don't think this will fit all!

 

Hmm, you are right D, we probably won't get many takers on that training!  There are other things to do besides crying tho that might even be more fun.  How about fishing or getting a trophy buck?  Maybe a big tax refund?

 

 

I can see you are one of those guys that wants to fix it for the crying ladies.  :wub:

Sometimes there is nothing to fix and that drives you guys nuts!  But women find it very sweet. 

 

Well, maybe the reverse is what's needed here for D.  Perhaps a list of things to make women cry would help.  I think smashing your thumb with a hammer would do the trick.  Or your favorite football team losing the championship?  Dipping your pigtail in the ink well is out of fashion these days.  Just not PC enough.

 

Well, here's some lists of things that make men cry.

 

10 things that make men cry..

http://news.bbc.co.u...ine/7540659.stm

 

80 more things that make men cry!

http://news.bbc.co.u...ine/7544985.stm

 

They left this one out for some reason.

http://movieclips.co...e-spocks-death/


  • 0
Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."
Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, and hard work. have a good day! :-) Paul

#13 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,220 posts
 

Posted 15 August 2013 - 04:47 AM

Nobody replied that they have this trouble Sometimes tears get a point across that no words can. 


  • 0

#14 answerseeker

 
answerseeker

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 381 posts
 

Posted 15 August 2013 - 08:23 PM

I was going to suggest Sjogren’s syndrome too. Since you said tears won't actually come out
  • 0

Lori age 40

 

GERD diagnosed Feb 2012

acute adult onset asthma diagnosed April 2012

celiac diagnosis July 2013

osteopenia Sept 2013

Dysautonomia: POTS (autonomic nervous system dysfunction)

DQ2 Gene


#15 1desperateladysaved

 
1desperateladysaved

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,220 posts
 

Posted 16 August 2013 - 03:55 AM

I was going to suggest Sjogren’s syndrome too. Since you said tears won't actually come out

I can be awful noisy, but no tears.  It sounds fakey to me!


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: