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Unable To Cry


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#16 answerseeker

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 05:58 AM

Maybe you should get tested I think it's just a blood test?
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Lori age 40

 

GERD diagnosed Feb 2012

acute adult onset asthma diagnosed April 2012

celiac diagnosis July 2013

osteopenia Sept 2013

Dysautonomia: POTS (autonomic nervous system dysfunction)

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#17 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 06:14 AM

Maybe you should get tested I think it's just a blood test?

Any ideas what treatment is available?  I wouldn't test something, unless I can do something about it.  I don't use drugs unless in dire straights.  I just would like to know if it would change my care depending on whether I have it or not.


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#18 kareng

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 08:13 AM

Any ideas what treatment is available?  I wouldn't test something, unless I can do something about it.  I don't use drugs unless in dire straights.  I just would like to know if it would change my care depending on whether I have it or not.


I know the dry eye part can lead to some serious eye issues.


http://www.sjogrens....ogrens-syndrome
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#19 AlwaysLearning

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:00 AM

I don't know much about sjogrens, but anything with the word "syndrome" in the name raises a red flag to me. It normally is used when the medical establishment doesn't understand something well enough to diagnose properly or treat.

If I were in your shoes, I'd probably hold off on testing for sjogren's ... for now. Looking them up just now, I see that the tests are pretty similar to the blood tests that are done for celiac - just look for markers of reactions rather than having something specific to identify. So that doesn't seem worth it to me. Plus, the treatments for sjogren's don't treat a cause, just mask the symptoms

I suppose I'd start by doing a ton of research into ALL of the possible causes of reduced tear production. You are more aware of what is going on with your diet and body than what any doctor can learn in a ten-minute appointment, just lack the knowledge/experience to be able to put clues together or ability to order tests. But being more informed could at least help you know what questions to ask when you do see one. And from what little I have researched, a rheumatologist may be helpful because they basically specialize in autoimmune reactions.

And though plenty of people think that reduced tear production can be just a normal part of aging, I'm not buying that. There is something that is causing it, either some sort of deficiency, imbalance, or damage. I can only hope that going gluten free will help your issues to improve as well because many of the causes appear to be auto-immune reactions. 

If you were to have some sort of testing done now, I'd probably start with vitamin deficiencies if you haven't had those tested already. Hormone-level testing couldn't hurt either. But definitely get your test results in writing and do your own research into the normal ranges. So many of them are just too broad and ignore that many of us have horrible symptoms even if we are in the normal ranges, just on the edges of them.

And I wouldn't overlook the really obvious things such as chronic dehydration. 

 


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#20 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:54 AM

I know the dry eye part can lead to some serious eye issues.


http://www.sjogrens....ogrens-syndrome

Oh, that reminds me that Mom was treated for dry eyes for years.

Thanks, I will check it out.

D


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#21 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:58 AM

I don't know much about sjogrens, but anything with the word "syndrome" in the name raises a red flag to me. It normally is used when the medical establishment doesn't understand something well enough to diagnose properly or treat.

If I were in your shoes, I'd probably hold off on testing for sjogren's ... for now. Looking them up just now, I see that the tests are pretty similar to the blood tests that are done for celiac - just look for markers of reactions rather than having something specific to identify. So that doesn't seem worth it to me. Plus, the treatments for sjogren's don't treat a cause, just mask the symptoms

I suppose I'd start by doing a ton of research into ALL of the possible causes of reduced tear production. You are more aware of what is going on with your diet and body than what any doctor can learn in a ten-minute appointment, just lack the knowledge/experience to be able to put clues together or ability to order tests. But being more informed could at least help you know what questions to ask when you do see one. And from what little I have researched, a rheumatologist may be helpful because they basically specialize in autoimmune reactions.

And though plenty of people think that reduced tear production can be just a normal part of aging, I'm not buying that. There is something that is causing it, either some sort of deficiency, imbalance, or damage. I can only hope that going gluten free will help your issues to improve as well because many of the causes appear to be auto-immune reactions. 

If you were to have some sort of testing done now, I'd probably start with vitamin deficiencies if you haven't had those tested already. Hormone-level testing couldn't hurt either. But definitely get your test results in writing and do your own research into the normal ranges. So many of them are just too broad and ignore that many of us have horrible symptoms even if we are in the normal ranges, just on the edges of them.

And I wouldn't overlook the really obvious things such as chronic dehydration. 

 

Thanks, I do feel like I am getting to the roots.  Thanks for helping confirm that.

 

D


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#22 Gemini

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 10:51 AM

I don't know much about sjogrens, but anything with the word "syndrome" in the name raises a red flag to me. It normally is used when the medical establishment doesn't understand something well enough to diagnose properly or treat.

If I were in your shoes, I'd probably hold off on testing for sjogren's ... for now. Looking them up just now, I see that the tests are pretty similar to the blood tests that are done for celiac - just look for markers of reactions rather than having something specific to identify. So that doesn't seem worth it to me. Plus, the treatments for sjogren's don't treat a cause, just mask the symptoms

I suppose I'd start by doing a ton of research into ALL of the possible causes of reduced tear production. You are more aware of what is going on with your diet and body than what any doctor can learn in a ten-minute appointment, just lack the knowledge/experience to be able to put clues together or ability to order tests. But being more informed could at least help you know what questions to ask when you do see one. And from what little I have researched, a rheumatologist may be helpful because they basically specialize in autoimmune reactions.

And though plenty of people think that reduced tear production can be just a normal part of aging, I'm not buying that. There is something that is causing it, either some sort of deficiency, imbalance, or damage. I can only hope that going gluten free will help your issues to improve as well because many of the causes appear to be auto-immune reactions. 

If you were to have some sort of testing done now, I'd probably start with vitamin deficiencies if you haven't had those tested already. Hormone-level testing couldn't hurt either. But definitely get your test results in writing and do your own research into the normal ranges. So many of them are just too broad and ignore that many of us have horrible symptoms even if we are in the normal ranges, just on the edges of them.

And I wouldn't overlook the really obvious things such as chronic dehydration. 

 

I guess there is some educating to do here......I would agree about the use of the word "syndrome", as in many cases, it can be used to identify a group of symptoms and then symptom treat.  I asked my doctor why the use of "syndrome" vs. disease and this is what she told me.  BTW...this is my functional medicine MD and not the mainstream kind that love to symptom treat.  It is used to describe conditions that exist and are real but have strong overlap of symptoms with other diseases.  Thank you...that was clear as mud.  IBS is one shining example because it's a generic way of saying your bowel is irritated yet is not a specific diagnosis. I have trouble understanding why Sjogren's is listed as a syndrome because it is a real disease.  Your salivery and lachrymal glands are destroyed by your immune system, much the same as your small intestine is by Celiac.  I have Sjogren's and was diagnosed via blood work.  So.......sorry if this is not a good explanation but it's what I learned.  A lot of what the medical world does is confusing.

 

The testing for Sjogren's involves antibody elevation, just like Celiac.  They are looking at SS-A and SS-B antibody levels.  They elevate when the immune system attacks the target glands.  It does not matter one bit that the testing is not for cause and the treatment does not mask the symptoms.  The treatment for the eyes is Restasis eyedrops and they are an extremely useful tool in dealing with the symptoms.  It may not cure anything because nothing will cure Sjogren's but anyone with Sjogren's as bad as I have it would be a fool to not use the eyedrops, if they help.  They can make a night and day difference. You can lose your eyesight from Sjogren's if your eyes get dry enough and I would use crack if it meant not losing my eyesight. Really, I mean that!  ^_^

 

Sjogren's does not cause a person to not be able to produce tears.  I have extremely dry eyes and mouth yet I can cry a flood whan I need to.  I know it says "decreased tear production" but that is in reference to the normal lubrication that occurs from the lachrymal glands.  You produce tears that lubricate your eyes and then there is the extreme release when you are upset and cry. I have dry eyes from day to day because I cannot produce enough tears to lubricate them. Sometimes "plugs" can be inserted into some of the tear ducts to block the loss of this normal lubrication and have it stay within the eye but it didn't do diddly for me and the Restasis did.  It's the only medicine I use for all 4 AI diseases I have and I am grateful we have it or I would have had to retire from my job a while ago as I use my eyes for work that needs good focus.  My eyes become easily irritated and mold bothers them but you learn to adapt and move on as best you can.

 

I would think, Diana, that your inability to shed tears has more to do with psychological issues than physical.  I mean this as a friend and not as a snarky you know what.  :)   You have suffered through the years like many of us and are referencing a miscarriage that happened a long time ago.  Maybe you either have come to accept all that life has thrown at you and have come to peaceful terms with it all as you recover from Celiac OR you have not and, with each new challenge that you face, push it under and don't react now that you feel you need to.  Maybe at some point everything became so overwhelming you just didn't want to deal with it on such a deep level.  That happens a lot to many people....they just seem to get stuck along the way.  Do you feel that this could be the case?  You could be tested for Sjogren's if you have really dry eyes but it usually involves the salivery glands also and you would know if your mouth were as dry as mine.  It isn't pleasant and requires a lot of "symptom' treating with liquids and mouthwashes, etc.  Just be aware that it's like Celiac testing.....you can have Sjogren's and not test positive on the antibody test.  This is pretty much the norm for all autoimmune testing.

 

I wish you luck and let me know if you have other questions about Sjogren's!  :)


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#23 kareng

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 11:28 AM

I don't know much about sjogrens, but anything with the word "syndrome" in the name raises a red flag to me. It normally is used when the medical establishment doesn't understand something well enough to diagnose properly or treat.
If I were in your shoes, I'd probably hold off on testing for sjogren's ... for now. Looking them up just now, I see that the tests are pretty similar to the blood tests that are done for celiac - just look for markers of reactions rather than having something specific to identify. So that doesn't seem worth it to me. Plus, the treatments for sjogren's don't treat a cause, just mask the symptoms
I suppose I'd start by doing a ton of research into ALL of the possible causes of reduced tear production. You are more aware of what is going on with your diet and body than what any doctor can learn in a ten-minute appointment, just lack the knowledge/experience to be able to put clues together or ability to order tests. But being more informed could at least help you know what questions to ask when you do see one. And from what little I have researched, a rheumatologist may be helpful because they basically specialize in autoimmune reactions.
And though plenty of people think that reduced tear production can be just a normal part of aging, I'm not buying that. There is something that is causing it, either some sort of deficiency, imbalance, or damage. I can only hope that going gluten free will help your issues to improve as well because many of the causes appear to be auto-immune reactions. 
If you were to have some sort of testing done now, I'd probably start with vitamin deficiencies if you haven't had those tested already. Hormone-level testing couldn't hurt either. But definitely get your test results in writing and do your own research into the normal ranges. So many of them are just too broad and ignore that many of us have horrible symptoms even if we are in the normal ranges, just on the edges of them.
And I wouldn't overlook the really obvious things such as chronic dehydration.


Many illnesses are treated by just treating the symptoms because we have no " cure" to treat the disease. I would think, for a person with Sjorgrens that treating the dry eye would be better than loosing their eyesight while waiting for a cure. Treating the blood sugar issues of a diabetic with insulin seems better to me than waiting for a a cure to fix the pancreas.

I posted the Sjorgrens link to show you all its a " real" disease. If that was her problem for years, her eye doctor would at least be treating her dry eyes.
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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
dancing-turkey.gif
 
 
 
 

 


#24 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 12:56 PM

Many illnesses are treated by just treating the symptoms because we have no " cure" to treat the disease. I would think, for a person with Sjorgrens that treating the dry eye would be better than loosing their eyesight while waiting for a cure. Treating the blood sugar issues of a diabetic with insulin seems better to me than waiting for a a cure to fix the pancreas.

I posted the Sjorgrens link to show you all its a " real" disease. If that was her problem for years, her eye doctor would at least be treating her dry eyes.

I am just thinking about my Mom.  I got at least 2 genes from Mom's side.  She is going down hill.  I think she has celiac, and did all I could to get her diagnosed, but It didn't work out.  Dad said they couldn't follow the diet anyway.  Dry eyes could be a similarity to my struggles, but I wouldn't say my eyes are dry yet.  They just don't abound when they should.

 

D


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#25 AlwaysLearning

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 12:57 PM

Gemini, I was thinking that jumping to a conclusion that sjogren's is a likely problem here may be a little hasty, especially considering that the original poster hasn't mentioned any complaints with dry eyes or dry mouth. By no means am I saying that sjogrens isn't serious or that using drops if you do have it isn't needed, just that there are many causes for not producing tears and doing one's research before going to a doctor can help.

But I still wish that science would get to the root of the problem. Western medicine is way too happy to treat symptoms without finding causes.

And I'd still say to start with the easy stuff that we know are common in those with celiac first like vitamin deficiencies and hormone imbalances that are linked to lack of tear production. But an additional note, eye doctors should also know more about tear production ... if you can find a good one.


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#26 kareng

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 12:58 PM

I am just thinking about my Mom.  I got at least 2 genes from Mom's side.  She is going down hill.  I think she has celiac, and did all I could to get her diagnosed, but It didn't work out.  Dad said they couldn't follow the diet anyway.  Dry eyes could be a similarity to my struggles, but I wouldn't say my eyes are dry yet.  They just don't abound when they should.
 
D


Do your eyes water when you cut an onion? Or when there is smoke from the BBQ or pollen in the air?
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Thanksgiving dinners take 18 hours to prepare.  They are consumed in 12 minutes.  Half-times take 12 minutes.  This is not a coincidence.  - Emma Bombeck
 
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#27 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 01:00 PM

Do your eyes water when you cut an onion? Or when there is smoke from the BBQ or pollen in the air?

They do a little.  They mostly burn.


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#28 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 01:05 PM

Nobody mentioned severe depression as a possibility.  I recently read if you are severely depressed you are sad, but do not cry.  However, I am functioning fairly normally even though I am passing through some tough times. 


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#29 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 01:18 PM

Oh, that reminds me that Mom was treated for dry eyes for years.

Thanks, I will check it out.

D

Quoted from above link:  "Sjögren’s is a chronic autoimmune disease in which people’s white blood cells attack their moisture-producing glands. Today, as many as four million Americans are living with this disease"

 

Hmm on the one hand I might have some more symptoms.  Yet, my dentist comments on my saliva pools.  It looked like the only treatment is for symptoms.  Mine are not severe.  I will ask for testing if I get curious.  Meanwhile, my vital organs have already been checked.  I am continuing a good recovery.  I am feeling quite energetic.  I am increasing my nutrient levels which has been proved by testing.  I am doing what I need to for now, but I will use some eyebright drops if my eyes get dry.

 

Okay?


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#30 Gemini

 
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Posted 16 August 2013 - 05:29 PM

Gemini, I was thinking that jumping to a conclusion that sjogren's is a likely problem here may be a little hasty, especially considering that the original poster hasn't mentioned any complaints with dry eyes or dry mouth. By no means am I saying that sjogrens isn't serious or that using drops if you do have it isn't needed, just that there are many causes for not producing tears and doing one's research before going to a doctor can help.

But I still wish that science would get to the root of the problem. Western medicine is way too happy to treat symptoms without finding causes.

And I'd still say to start with the easy stuff that we know are common in those with celiac first like vitamin deficiencies and hormone imbalances that are linked to lack of tear production. But an additional note, eye doctors should also know more about tear production ... if you can find a good one.

I don't recall saying that Diana had Sjogren's but gave her the information she needed to decide what she should do.  If you don't have dry mouth, then it's highly unlikely that it's Sjogren's.  There is a known reason for the disease.....it's autoimmune and if you go long enough with undiagnosed Celiac, your autoimmune system never calms down and you start to develop other AI problems.  The root of all disease is inflammation and that's how the AI system runs out of control, along with certain genetic factors.

 

I don't know of any imbalances that cause reduced tear production.  Some medications cause dry eye but when you are being assessed for Sjogen's, they do not test for other issues as you mentioned. In all the research I have done for it, I never came across any issues that would cause it, other than autoimmune in nature. Sjogren's dry eye is much more severe than run of the mill dryness. You also will have dry mouth, which is just as severe.  I knew I had it before I was tested.  I just let the doctor do the blood work to humor her.  They like to have it on paper.   ^_^   With Sjogren's, you will also have dental problems...major dental problems.


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