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20Ppm - Serving Size?
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6 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

 

I hope this isn't a stupid question - but can I ask, if a packet of biscuits is labelled as gluten free (less than 20ppm) does that refer to the entire packet or an individual serving size?

 

Math's has never been my strong point, but I'm beginning to wonder if I'm eating too much gluten free foods on any given day and gradually noticing a cumulative effect?

 

Sorry again, if this is a daft question - I have used the 'search' facility but couldn't find an answer.

 

Many thanks...........

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It doesn't mean there is any gluten.  Its just a test that is run on a little bit of a batch of  food.  Less than 20 ppm could mean it has 19 ppm or 2 ppm or 0.

 

A lot of processed gluten free junk is still processed junk.  gluten-free baked goods have some ingredients that aren't in gluten baked goods or not very often. 

 

Maybe cut back on the processed stuff and eat a little more of the naturally gluten-free stuff -  fruits, rice, meat, veggies, etc?

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It is the whole package, each biscuit in the package, and each bite (or crumb) of the biscuit.

Parts per million is a ratio, not a quantitative measure. If something contains 20 ppm of something else, that is 0.002 percent of the mentioned item. Eat 10 grams--you get 0.0002 grams. Eat 100 grams--you get 0.002 grams. Eat a kilogram--you get 0.02 grams.

Remember, too, that the test threshold is not the amount present. Zero is less than 20, and less than ten, and less than five--those being common test thresholds.

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It is the whole package, each biscuit in the package, and each bite (or crumb) of the biscuit.

Parts per million is a ratio, not a quantitative measure. If something contains 20 ppm of something else, that is 0.002 percent of the mentioned item. Eat 10 grams--you get 0.0002 grams. Eat 100 grams--you get 0.002 grams. Eat a kilogram--you get 0.02 grams.

Remember, too, that the test threshold is not the amount present. Zero is less than 20, and less than ten, and less than five--those being common test thresholds.

 

As Peter explained, it's a density, not an amount.  And this is why I find this "threshold" SO ridiculously annoying.  What is the actual DOSAGE (quantity) that causes most people to show damage?  I'm not sure that I've ever convincingly figured that out from the studies that were done for the "20ppm" standard.

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It's concentration.  It's under a certain level.  If there is any tiny amount in there, it will be cumulative.  Eating more would give you a larger dose.  For example, if there is one speck of contamination, for every teaspoon of food, when you eat 2 teaspoons of food, you will get 2 specks.  When you eat 100 teaspoons, you will get 100 speaks.  If you have a sensitivity level such that 100 specks per day will make you sick, but 2 specks per day will not make you sick, you will be O.K. with 2 teaspoons per day, but 100 teaspoons per day will make you sick.

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As Peter explained, it's a density, not an amount.  And this is why I find this "threshold" SO ridiculously annoying.  What is the actual DOSAGE (quantity) that causes most people to show damage?  I'm not sure that I've ever convincingly figured that out from the studies that were done for the "20ppm" standard.

 

I've read most Celiacs don't react until 20 ppm so a less than 20 ppm is supposed to be ok for us hence the threshold for amount allowed and still be called gluten free. I've also read that Celiacs don't react until 10 ppm so really no one but the Celiac knows for sure in my opinion.

It would have been great if they required ppm to be listed on labels but manufactures didn't like that provision and it was eliminated as a possible requirement.

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