Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

Can Soy Intolerance Cause Villous Atrophy?
0

7 posts in this topic

Intolerances suck. But I always assumed that even though they sometimes cause similar reactions as gluten, that they do not cause the same kind of damage to the vili as does gluten for people with Celiac disease.

 

However, I'm doing a little research, and turns out there's some evidence that intolerances to dairy/soy/corn/etc might cause villous atrophy. Anyone else know about this? (There have probably been similar discussions before, but new info/research is always good

 

Here's some stuff I found regarding soy intolerance:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/987760

not the full article, but here's a study of infants with dairy intolerance who also showed vilous atrophy when they ate soy. Hmmm

 

This info was based on the study, about soy intolerance:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/932026-overview

"Small-bowel atrophy has been documented in different studies. The degree of villous atrophy may be similar to that found in celiac disease"

 

I didn't have a biopsy before I went gluten-free, and my bloodtests (done about a year before and just before going gluten-free) came back negative, but Celiac runs in both sides of my family. I'm self-diagnosed, but have always considered myself Celiac. However, I also have dairy and soy intolerances. I had a biopsy last fall to check of any problems, and they did see some mild gastritis but, not surprisingly, no villi damage. I hadn't eaten gluten for 4 years, and cut out dairy and soy the year before.

 

The big question from all of this is, if other foods can cause the same damage as gluten, then a: is this why a lot of people don't get better on the gluten-free diet alone, and b: could negative blood work but a positive biopsy when testing for celiac actually show damage from something other than gluten, or as well as gluten?
So, theoretically, if someone was still having problems a couple years after going gluten free, doing another biopsy might not be a bad idea to check for villous atrophy that could be caused by other proteins. Has anyone ever done this? Of course, seeing more damage still wouldn't tell you what's causing it, but could be proof that another intolerance is wreaking havoc on your gut.

 

Anyway, any other research, thoughts, etc would be helpful. All very interesting stuff.

 

Cheers

Peg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

I am a type 1 diabetic and have a first cousin who is also type 1diabetic and has celiac disease.  My HLA typing is DQ2, which also puts me at increased risk for celiac disease.  Over the last 12 years, I had unexplained iron deficiency; and over the last several years, I lost quite a bit of weight.  Several years ago, I switched from whole grains to just brown rice suspecting I might have celiac disease or gluten intolerance.  One year ago, I had antibody tests and a biopsy which turned out to be negative for celiac disease.  The biopsy did show a few lymphocytes, but nothing diagnostic.  That being said, if I ate any food containing gluten, I would develop GI distress--so I continued with the gluten free diet, but the weight loss continued.  Several months ago, I found a publication indicating that apple juice of all things could worsen inflammatory bowel disease.  Interestingly, for the last 33 years, I've used apple juice to treat low blood sugar.  After finding out about apple juice, I switched to blueberry juice.  And having made this change, my weight now appears to be slowly moving into an uptrend.  So the bottom line is that other foods can cause inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract--especially if you have a genetic predisposition for a particular gastrointestinal disease, be it celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease.  As for whether or not you should have another biopsy, I kind of wonder if you take a closer look at what you are presently eating whether you might find some other food or foods that may be continuing to cause gastrointestinal problems for you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I'm definitely not running off to have another biopsy. I know that gluten/soy/dairy is bad for me, and having to eat them again would be, well, not good.

I was just curious whether anyone else had seen further research/evidence, etc.

 

Apple juice is extremely high in fructose, so much that it's really not that good for you. Glad the blueberry is helping.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I'm definitely not running off to have another biopsy. I know that gluten/soy/dairy is bad for me, and having to eat them again would be, well, not good.

I was just curious whether anyone else had seen further research/evidence, etc.

 

Apple juice is extremely high in fructose, so much that it's really not that good for you. Glad the blueberry is helping.

The publications on soy appear to stem from (ie: caused by) soy protein isolate--not soy beans per se.  That being said, if you have an allergy to soy protein, you should definitely avoid soy beans.  As for the problems with dairy, they extend way beyond dairy.  In the United States, cows and chickens are fed grains rather than grass, resulting in the production of fats which are rich in omega-6 fatty acids, which in excess can cause significant inflammation.  Whereas 100% grass fed chickens lay eggs with a balanced omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio of about 1:1, grain fed chickens lay eggs with an omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio of about 20-30:1.  Similar results are found with grain-fed cows (beef), cow milk, chickens, and grain-fed ("farm-raised") fish such as tilapia.  An excellent book with literature references for these findings was written by a physician with brain cancer who used his knowledge of nutrition to keep his cancer at bay for many years:  "Anti-Cancer:  A New Way of LIfe" by David Servan-Schreiber, MD, PhD.  Just Google the title and you'll find the book available through Amazon.com.  I highly recommend it.  You will more than likely get a lot of information about the foods and food derivatives you are consuming which may be adding to any problems that you may still be having. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NutritionGuy, I heard this doctor on a radio program quite a while back. Can't remember now if it was People's Pharmacy or some other NPR show. It was so interesting. It sure seemed that his nutritional choices kept him alive much longer than if he had just kept eating the way he used to.

 

Also, I've got to ask you based on your name and the knowledge you seem to have - are you a nutritionist or a dietition, or maybe even a doctor? Whichever or none of the above, welcome to the forum and thanks for your input!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Bartful:  I have a very strong strong scientific background.  That being said, most of what I am posting is based on personal experience as well as my knowledge of the scientific literature.  As for David Servan-Schreiber, I only came across his book by accident, and I was very profoundly influenced by what he wrote.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am off soy in any and all forms.

I've heard about some people reacting to eggs/meat from grain-fed animals, but never noticed any difference myself.

 

In any case, still no more info on whether or soy or other proteins (casein, corn...) could cause villous atrophy in the same way that gluten does?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,341
    • Total Posts
      920,478
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • As a GI specialty nurse who also has celiac I can tell you that it can not be diagnosed by CT and rarely unless you have severe disease can it be diagnosed by colonoscopy.  Those that have had it diagnosed by colonoscopy have such because their MDs were above to get into the small bowel from the bottom and take biopsys.  Celiac damage is not seen in the large intestine.  Also many people do not have diarrhea, many have constipation or a 50/50 mix between the two.  Celiac has 300 connected symptoms and sometimes no symptoms at all.  It's called the " great pretender" because of this.
    • Okay, thanks! I am 24 but my husband and I don't plan on having kids. However, the more I thought about it, the more I think I should get one for my brother's sake. Especially after my doctor's office called this evening to say my bloodwork tested positive for Celiac. Guess I will be on this forum longer than I thought!
    • You just got diagnosed Celiac and are wondering how serious this really is. What if there is just a little gluten in your food? What if you use the same toaster for your gluten-free bread as your wife's/husband's regular bread? What if those french fries are gluten-free but they fry them in the same fryer as those nice gluten coated onion rings? View the full article
    • Hi, I've never been on a forum before but thought I might find some answers here.  I have never been tested for celiac but a nurse practitioner I saw a few years ago told me she thought I would benefit from a gluten free diet.  At first, I thought I could never do this but after some encouragement I did try.  I did feel much better after going gluten free.  She never tested me for celiac. I turned 50 years old last year and I had a colonoscopy for the first time and had three polyps removed.  The surgeon said that my colon looked like I was a chronic laxative user.  I haven't used a laxative for a very long time.  I was at the time drinking a natural tea to help me to have bowel movements.  Before starting the tea I had always had difficulty with bowel movements and never had them once a day but with the tea I was able to go once a day. At the end of last month I developed severe pain after I would eat (I had my gallbladder removed at the age of 19).  One night the pain got so bad my husband had to drive me to the ER.  My liver functions were high as well as a few other things.  They did a CT scan of my abdomen and pelvis that showed wall thickening of my transverse colon and minimal irregularity involving the transverse colon.  My descending and sigmoid colon were collapsed.  There were a few tiny mesenteric lymph nodes present on the right.  They diagnosed me officially with colitis but said that most likely I had a gallstone (even though I don't have a gallbladder) that had come from the liver and had gotten stuck in the common bile duct (it did not show up on the CT scan).  I usually have a high ferritin level too.  I've been home from the hospital stay for about a month now and still have tenderness in the epigastric area. Some of this may not have anything to do with celiac but was wondering if anyone has been diagnosed with celiac by CT scan or colonoscopy or if anyone has had the same problems that I have had and found out what has caused it.  I cannot see the gastroenterologist who saw me in the hospital for a couple of months.  Can you have celiac and not have diarrhea as I am just the opposite? Any help would be appreciated!  Thanks!  
    • I had an acne flair up after going gluten free but it ended up improving and some long-term back acne I had been dealing with actually went away.  I think going gluten free was a shock to my system and at first I actually felt worse but after about a month things got better. 
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,411
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Aly46
    Joined