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One Study Said 60% Of Celiacs Are Not Healing Just With Diet.


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#1 1desperateladysaved

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 12:01 PM

This was posted by the administer recently.  http://scoopsandiego...039af5dd4a.html

 

I guess there may be a lot of reasons for not healing .  This is a thread to see what your ideas are.  Also, do other studies find that 60% are not healing?

 

 


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#2 Adalaide

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 12:30 PM

There is no reference to back up that number so for all we know they pulled that 60% out of their you-know-whats. On top of that, it looks like nothing more than a sponsored story by a company that has been pushing the media very hard lately in an attempt to get more guinea pigs for their study so they can sell drugs to celiacs so they can get money. "News" about celiac doesn't come from drug pushers.


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#3 IrishHeart

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 02:27 PM

Diana

Read the entire article. No references. That number came from where exactly?

scroll to the bottom of the "article"

It's an ad for people to be part of a drug research study.

It's not a fact that 60% of celiacs do not heal.

 

.


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#4 nvsmom

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 03:35 PM

I agree with Adalaide and Irish, not much there to back that up.  That being said, I wouldn't be surprised if about half of celiacs continue to have some problems after going gluten-free. If you've been damaging yourself with gluten for years, not everything will be repairable. I personally have made HUGE gains in my health since going gluten-free over a year ago but I still have lingering health issues... I just can't be sure if it is still from celiac or if it is some other autoimmune health problem (possibly kicked off by celiac disease) that is causing it all.  KWIM?

 

If I regain my full health, I'll be pleasantly surprised. I am pretty pleased with the improvements so far.  :)


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#5 IrishHeart

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 03:55 PM

Furthermore, I find this type of article "alarmist" and inappropriate.

 

The articles come through the website --anything that is related to "gluten" and "celiac"

floating around out there is on a constant media loop. so to speak.

 

They run the gamut from blog articles to fluff pieces to book reviews to recipes to actual published medical literature.

 

Just because it was posted by admin, does not mean anyone endorses it or that someone has proofread it for accuracy..


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#6 Pegleg84

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 08:57 AM

The article also says that as long as you wash the gluteny stuff off the cutting board, you shouldn't get glutened... and I think we all know that unless it's one of those glass ones, then a shared cutting board (for example) could be causing low-level cc no matter how well you wash it

So their idea isn't that even if you take every precaution possible (completely gluten-free household, no eating out, etc) you might still have symptoms from long term consequences of damage, rather than damaging yourself more through CC.

As much as something that prevents mild cc symptoms would be nice, it's probably going to have a huge $$ on the bottle.

 

Yeah, the 60% seems to have come straight out of the air.


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#7 kareng

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:28 AM

There are some studies that say that about 60% do not entirely heal.  But we should read the actual studies before panicking &  to see things like:

 

- compliance to the diet

- were they actually biopsied or just going on anecdotal  reports of stomach aches. gas, etc which may be caused by other things

- what was actually considered continued damage

- probably some other things I haven't thought of.


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#8 kareng

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:40 AM

Should have added that the article didn't give a time frame, did it?  It may be referring to this study.  After 5 years 85% were healed. 

 

http://celiacdisease...pubmed/12219789

 

"Of patients with Marsh IIIA, IIIB, or IIIC lesions, histologic remission was seen in 65.0% within 2 years, 85.3% within 5 years, and 89.9% in long-term follow-up"


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#9 GFinDC

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 07:25 AM

This was posted by the administer recently.  http://scoopsandiego...039af5dd4a.html

 

I guess there may be a lot of reasons for not healing .  This is a thread to see what your ideas are.  Also, do other studies find that 60% are not healing?

 

Hi Diana,

 

To answer your question, I think sometimes people don't heal quickly because they are experiencing damage from other food intolerances, or they are not really as gluten-free as they think they are.  Especially for beginners, it seems to take a while to get used to avoiding gluten.


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Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.
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#10 NoGlutenCooties

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 04:34 AM

Just one point to add... it also depends on how healthy the person ate before and after going gluten free.  Simply being gluten free does not equate to healthy.  If the person ate like crap before the diagnosis then their body is likely to be weaker and more depleted and therefore take longer to heal.  And if the person continues to eat like crap after going gluten free then it will take them a long time to heal - if they ever really do.  Unfortunately, many people do not know how to eat healthy, nor do they understand the importance of it.


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#11 T.H.

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 08:17 AM

I wonder if they were referencing the same study as the Celiac Disease Center is for their 60% number:

http://www.curecelia...guide/treatment

 

Unfortunately, the celiac center doesn't reference the research specifically, either. But the research center makes more mention of the fact that diet compliance can affect the results.

 

The study results seem to vary, otherwise. I wonder if they are more consistent when you look at them by area, perhaps? Some differences in brands or gluten free food laws that might affect the patients' food? Or maybe better patient education and support?

 

I know the study Kareng mentions is from the Netherlands, but a study in Italy and in the USA had different results. It seems weird that the results would be so different without something else going on that is maybe not being taken into account by the researchers, you know? :-/

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/20145607

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/19302264


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