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1St Holiday Season After Dx - How Did You Feel/do/cope?


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#16 momIM12

 
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Posted 22 November 2013 - 09:18 PM

This is also my 1st Holiday Gluten free, and I totally get how you are feeling. We go to my in-laws for Thanksgiving. So I had to call my Father in law twice to make sure he was getting a turkey that was Gluten free and then to find out if he was going to stuff it or not. It causes so much anxiety. I hate feeling like a burden. I am just bringing my own sides.

It sorta sucks 1st holiday, I am sure it gets easier as you adjust to the new lifestyle. But i understand about the depression. I wish I could hibernate for the next 5-6 weeks.

Hope you have good holiday and all goes smoothly.


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#17 glutenfreeliac

 
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Posted 22 November 2013 - 09:33 PM

Just returned from my grandson's baptism.  There wasn't a thing at the party I could eat.  :-(    This will be my first Holidays post-diagnosed with Celiac Disease.  My husband and I will do the cooking.  I told our adult children it will be a gluten-free Thanksgiving and it will be delicious.  I HOPE so.  It took being diagnosed with Celiac to realize how every single event whether daily or family Holidays revolve around eating.  This is life changing. 

 

I promise you it will be delicious. When you think about it, most of the Thanksgiving meal is easily gluten-free. Yes, there is stuffing/dressing and rolls, but just about everything else (including gravy) can be gluten-free without making any sacrifice in flavor. Though I'd advise avoiding pre-brined/basted turkeys. One of my book club friends made a great gluten-free stuffing for a pumpkin dish she made for our November meeting (she's vegetarian and was experimenting...oddly, everyone at that meeting did a gluten-free thing, which was incredibly cool). Last year, I made non-gluten-free stuffing for the rest of the family, and may do that this year because my brother loves my sourdough stuffing. I can do that for him without compromising anything, and I'm at the point in my gluten-free life where I can appreciate someone else's enjoyment of something I can no longer eat.

 

I don't crave it at all.

 

I was a bit disheartened by this thread because, yes, there are challenges when it comes to eating out/at the homes of others, but when it comes to certain meals there are also opportunities. It's hard adjusting to this lifestyle, and we all make mistakes. But approaching these situations with a negative perspective makes it hard to see how we can make this work for us in the long run.


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#18 bartfull

 
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Posted 23 November 2013 - 09:03 AM

http://www.celiac.co...01/#entry896943

OK, ALL of you who are considering eating someone else's cookin, read this. Click on and read all the links too. And if you think you STILL want to eat something a relative who doesn't have any experience with celiac made, remember, post-glutening you need to take extra probiotics, drink lits of water, and get lots of rest. You WILL need it.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#19 1desperateladysaved

 
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Posted 23 November 2013 - 09:44 AM

Super-Sensitive- and otherwise very strange view, but it is MINE.  Nobody else I know is like this.  My point is family time is more important then food: Not that you should do what I do. (okay?)

 

Last year I warned the hostess and my siblings that I would need to bring my own food.   I carefully covered my own Thanksgiving Dinner  and had it heated it in the oven.  I ate my food at the table.  Everyone (But one) knew in advance, so I didn't surprise most and I tried to hide it from the one.  I almost did, but when the subject came up, I looked toward what the kids were doing, and didn't respond.  It worked!    However, The next day I had signs of a gluten reaction.  After that and a couple of other experiences, the doctor told me I needed to eat at home.  So this year I can't eat with  the family, but I can't stay away.

 

I am planning to eat my meal in the car either on the way or on the way home.  I still plan to go and to keep company with the family all the while my immediate family can enjoy the gluteney things they commonly don't get.  I am planning to ask to be seated at the small table around a corner so as not to be an offense to a particular person.  I am pretty sure I can enlist the cooperation of my sister, the host, and other family members to do this.

 

I think if you must be different it is proper to warn at least the hostess and possibly others in advance.  I presented to my siblings that I desired to eat with them (last year) but because I had celiac disease, I would only be able to eat what I cooked.  I offered to make any and all with celiac disease (diagnosed by then or who wanted it) a gluten free dinner like mine!  It was a joke, since nobody had any inclination to get tested.  This year I already talked to my sister the hostess, and am bringing sweet potatoes, and plan to tell my brother and spouse also that I will not be able to eat there.  My parents already know about the situation.  My sister thought I would not be coming because of the situation, but I explained that if I didn't come, I quite possibly would never be able to do anything with the extended family again. 

 

For next year, I have to come up with how to be hostess.  We generally share in the cooking and bringing.  I may be having them to cook here with my ingredients, or doing it all myself.  Hmm the prospect of having them cook here sounds intriguing.  In the meanwhile, I am going to have to work on having food that tastes good.  My theory the first 18 months of gluten free has been EAT IT, it will fill your tummy!  I didn't always have the energy to search out new recipes or experiment.  Hopefully, I can be really good at it by next year.

 

 

Oh,  by the way, my sisters table is full, so someone has to sit around the corner!

 

D.


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#20 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 23 November 2013 - 10:53 AM

All right, everyone.....I may have written that Newbie 101 thread and I stand by all the info in it, but I never wrote a single sentence proclaiming: you can't eat at someone's house.

Because I do not believe that.

 

This is how you survive Thanksgiving at someone's house:

 

(1)My friend is making an unstuffed turkey in a silver foil pan I gave her ($2.50)with a new baster. ($1.29)

I insist on new basters because I was "glutened by baster" my first THX (long story about two turkeys--1 stuffed, 1 not and a sister who thought it was ok to baste them both with 1 baster)

and I have "issues" with those damn things. :D

Anyway, no gluten involved in turkey. I still have NEVER seen a turkey with gluten in it, despite what some people have posted here in the past.

(2) She makes the roasted root veggies, but we slice and dice together while we chatter away drinking champagne.

We cut them on flexible cutting boards I bring her . they can be found in a variety of places, and they look like this:

 

http://www.williams-...=26-224069460-2

 

(3) I make the gravy with some G F flour I bring using the pan drippings that have never been near any gluten..

(4) I bring G F stuffing made in a crockpot that everyone loves.  No gluten.

 

recipe here: http://crockpot365.b...g-crockpot.html

 

(5) We make a cheese, pate and veggie platter with Crunchmaster crackers for appetizers. No gluten.

(6) we have a shrimp cocktail platter. No gluten.

(7) she makes her family recipe of cranberry-orange relish. No gluten involved. I have watched her make it a dozen times.

(8) She makes a green bean casserole the day before Thanksgiving. I can't eat it and I do not care anyway. Never liked it. Even if it is passed around the table,

it's not going to miraculously gluten me.

(9) I bring the desserts because I am the one who makes them the best  :lol:

 

Flourless chocolate cake with ganache

 

recipe here:

http://www.kingarthu...ate-cake-recipe

 

and 

Pumpkin cheesecake with pecan/gingersnap crust

 

recipe here

http://www.finecooki...ecan-crust.aspx

 

(10) select a nice wine for dinner and one for dessert.

 

This does not have to be the end of the world. It just takes common sense, planning and it requires some assistance and understanding from the hostess,. But unless you are going to be cooking (which I normally do), you need to do a bit of advanced prep, but you can dine at someone's home and be perfectly fine. I have done it many times.

 

I am very sensitive to trace gluten, but I can assure you, I will not be dining outside or in another room. I eat at the table with everyone else. There's no reason celiacs can't enjoy dinner with friends and family. It just takes a few steps of precaution and an understanding hostess. 

 

If you do not feel up to this task just yet, and that is understandable when you are newly diagnosed, then just bring your own dinner and go and enjoy your relatives. If they keep pestering you about why, just say this:

 

MY DOCTOR SAID I HAVE TO EAT THIS WAY RIGHT NOW SO I CAN GET WELL.

leave it at that. All older relatives will get "MY DOCTOR SAID" ;)

 

Don't spend your time defending, explaining or being upset. Later, you can mail them all an explanation of celiac and what it takes

to be truly gluten-free and they can read it and learn about it and maybe talk with you about it..

 

Don't avoid seeing family members --they love you and you love them!-- and you can use their loving support right now.

 

Cheers, IH

 

PS>>and now, I am going to make this post its own thread so I do not have to write this mother of a post all over again.  :D


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#21 tonalynn

 
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Posted 03 December 2013 - 03:08 PM

I just thought I'd give an update about how my 1st gluten free Thanksgiving at my family's went. Remember I was so stressed out? Turns out they had a better handle on things than I thought. They did an absolutely FANTASTIC job. Everything was gluten free. They were very careful about making sure they had gluten free stuffing (really good) made a batch of gluten free gravy before their own gravy, even bought Udi's frozen French baguettes for the rolls (really dry and hard. Come on Udi's you can do better than that!). My sister always makes the pies from scratch, and with fruit from her own garden. She said she experimented with the gluten free flour, and had to add lard to the crusts to make them hold together. They turned out delicious! They even made pecan sandies (cookies) and an entire gluten free batch, just for me. I brought my deviled eggs they ask for every year, and a large veggie tray for the appetizers.

 

I'm so glad I had nothing to worry about. I had no idea they had researched celiac and put in so much work, I'm very thankful. And told them so!!

 

It just further illustrated that my anti-depressants aren't working (they haven't been since before I went gluten-free) and I need to have them adjusted. I'm just not coping well with anything, not just the celiac. So that's the next order of business.

 

Just wanted to update so everything from me is not doom and gloom! :-)


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#22 WestCoastGirl

 
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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:11 PM

To the "big family Christmas," I'm bringing my own two dishes. I did the same on Thanksgiving.

 

For the "little family Christmas" (us, the in-laws and BIL and family), I am hosting it. :) I will be making gluten-free stuffing without telling anybody (have done this a bajillion times with my own family and they still have no clue), turkey, gravy which I'll be making in a non-dedicated pan, cauliflower, sweet potatoes and white mashed potatoes and probably green beans with bacon. I will be making candy cane fudge (naturally gluten-free, no problems there, and obviously in a dedicated pan) for dessert. If I have the energy to add pumpkin pie with a gluten-free crust (this crust is amazing), I'll make that too. Again, my family has eaten this with zero clue...trust me, they'd ask, they're not shy about that sort of thing! I'll be handing out little goody bags of candy at the end of the festivities.


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- Determined gluten and dairy sensitivities via elimination diet
- DXd Hypothyroid December 2008 (Levothyroxine)
- Ongoing Vitamin D deficiency (rassessed every 3 months), DXd January 2010 (supplements)
- Gluten symptoms: mainly neurological, but some gastrointestinal (brain fog, depression, clumsiness, fatigue, D, bloating, DH)

~Getting my life back!~


#23 BelleVie

 
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Posted 04 December 2013 - 02:44 AM

I think that if you take your own food and someone expresses to you that they are disappointed or insulted, you look them in the eyes and very firmly, but kindly say, "I'm very sorry, but my body is very sick right now. I NEED to eat only foods that I've prepared." Don't make a scene, don't be angry or cruel about it…just be firm. I know it sucks, and I get you--I'm a "people pleaser" too. But it is your physical health. You have to be your own advocate. Like the other ladies have said, you will get sick if you eat their food. It stinks, but it's true. Hell, I cooked my own food for Thanksgiving this year and I STILL managed to gluten myself with contaminated rice. If they absolutely want to make food for you, why not give them some good gluten-free brands for desserts? They could buy a couple of pre-made cakes or cupcakes (I'm thinking Glutino or Kinnikinnick, not something made in a bakery of course) to accommodate you. 

 

Good luck with this. I'm really sorry you have to deal with this right now, at this time of year, but it's really, really important for you to keep yourself healthy and safe.

 

(Now that I've written this, I have seen that your Thanksgiving went well. I'm glad!) 


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#24 cap6

 
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Posted 04 December 2013 - 11:50 AM

Ok, need to add my assorted two cents in here.... :)

 

Udi's baguettes are dry (!!! and their dinner rolls were really bad) but try it with butter and topped with fresh parmesan  cheese under the broiler.....yum!!!  

 

To onedesperateladysaved, I am not trying to be rude just to understand, why are you unable to eat at the same table?  If you have your own spot at the end of the table, own food, etc. would you not be safe?   

 

I made stuffing that was the best we have ever had!  I buttered and toasted under the broiler two loaves of Udi white bread, added fresh herbs from my garden, eggs, chicken stock, onions, celery..... omgosh it was sooo good.  :P

 

And for pumpkin pie.... followed the recipe on the Libby's can using half 7 half instead of the condenced milk & used the new g.f. pie crust by Pillsbury.  Another yummer. 

 

And here's to hoping that we all have a safe and yummy Christmas!


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#25 ItchyAbby

 
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Posted 04 December 2013 - 12:55 PM

Hooray for lard pie crusts! They are the best, IMO.

 

So glad that it went well for you, tonalynn. Isn't it wonderful when your family steps up and supports you? This was my first Thanksgiving, post-dx and it went swimmingly (to be fair, parts of my family have been gluten-free for a few years, so we've had some practice). I come from a food-centric family too. We are not New York Jewish nor Italian, but we might as well be the way we deal with food :lol:

 

As far as how you are coping - shoot, it's hard! This is no small thing you are doing - a complete food overhaul! Of course it's going to cause you some angst! It's freaking hard to redesign your relationship with food, most especially when you are not feeling that well. I'm just saying, absolutely get your meds checked out, but also just recognize that you are going through a major life transition. One of the wise, long time posters here told me "You're just going to be unbalanced for a while" and for some reason that helped. Try to be gentle with yourself, ok?

 

Oh and these rolls: I know, I know - you don't like to cook, but give them a try, maybe for Christmas dinner. They are really quite simple, though you do need to plan ahead to let the dough rise. And do make sure you let them cool before eating them. The texture is not so great when they are hot from the oven but gets nice a buttery-chewy when they cool off.


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Self Diagnosed with DH in June 2013

MD and ND confirmed shortly thereafter

Gluten free June 1, 2013

Low Iodine July 15, 2013 - (waiting for the rash to clear...)

Other symptoms: IBS-D gone, skin on face much clearer, anxiety gone, periods regulating and less painful, and oh! this one is new: I have not had a UTI since going gluten-free (used to get them several times a year)

Currently training to become a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner. I want to heal as many guts as I can!

 

Love Heals.


#26 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 04 December 2013 - 01:03 PM

A few thoughts:

 

(1) I always use lard for pie crust. I'm old school.  :D before DX and still. Nothing like it. IMHO

 

(2) The UDIs baguettes will never be the baguettes I used to make, but they are not THAT bad. Just don't cook them too long, that's all.

I had one today and it was still squishy inside.

 

(3) the pumpkin cheesecake pie recipe was really good. Not one person at my friend's house for dinner knew it was "G F", they just scarfed it down, had a piece of the chocolate cake too and asked us when we are opening our restaurant.

Oh,  I added 1/4 cup  crushed pecans to the crust recipe. Total yumsters!

 

(4) the crock pot stuffing---was a huge hit. Again, no one even knew it was G F until after dinner when the convo rolled around to "hey, why do people go G F anyway?" and my pal said "Well, she has celiac, I'll let her tell you............"

I was brief. Honest! :lol: really. I was. 


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#27 Adalaide

 
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Posted 04 December 2013 - 01:09 PM


(4) the crock pot stuffing---was a huge hit. Again, no one even knew it was G F until after dinner when the convo rolled around to "hey, why do people go G F anyway?" and my pal said "Well, she has celiac, I'll let her tell you............"

I was brief. Honest! :lol: really. I was. 

 

I'm quite sure the comas were all food comas. :P


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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#28 IrishHeart

 
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Posted 04 December 2013 - 01:27 PM

I'm quite sure the comas were all food comas. :P

 

well, yeah.....tryptophan and sparkling wine....I had a lulled audience already :lol: .


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#29 WestCoastGirl

 
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Posted 05 December 2013 - 10:15 AM

When I bring my own food to gatherings, I always think of it as a kindness to the hosts, not as a slap in the face. I mean, asking them to buy a new dedicated pan and utensils and then buy separate gluten-free items, to be cut and prepared on a new dedicated cutting board with dishwasher-scoured (or new) cutting and stirring implements, plus - if it's a baked item - probably very expensive gluten-free ingredients, is a little over-the-top. This person is already busy, and already probably spending a pretty penny on this party.

 

I would be WAY more embarrassed to ask them to do all that, than I would be presenting a nice dish at the party: "I brought this! I'm gluten-free so can you put it over here away from the other food for now and let me have the first slice? But after that it's all yours, I hope you love it, my kids tested it and loved it!"


  • 0

- Determined gluten and dairy sensitivities via elimination diet
- DXd Hypothyroid December 2008 (Levothyroxine)
- Ongoing Vitamin D deficiency (rassessed every 3 months), DXd January 2010 (supplements)
- Gluten symptoms: mainly neurological, but some gastrointestinal (brain fog, depression, clumsiness, fatigue, D, bloating, DH)

~Getting my life back!~


#30 cap6

 
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Posted 05 December 2013 - 01:15 PM

I like your way of looking at it!  A kind way of turning the table so to speak


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