Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Sleepaway Camp
0

10 posts in this topic

Have you all sent your kids to any gluten-free sleepaway camps? 

 

My oldest has gone to Girl Scout camp the past two summers, but there is NO way I trust their standards in helping her with her diet and providing suitable alternatives.  I did try to contact them with questions (left a message and an email - both with no response) because I told her I would, but still doubt I would send her there.

 

So I've been looking online and trying to find her a place to go.  For the record, we are a midwestern family that has been grooming our kids for New England camp since in utero!  Anyway, I found Camp Eagle Hill and it looks awesome.  Seriously - it's a lot of what we were looking for before the DX and now it looks even better with a dedicated gluten-free kitchen and a dedicated chef.  Plus the director's daughter has celiac (I read that on another site).  I also ran across Camp Weekaneatit - through the Georgia ROCK chapter.  My worry about that is that it's not a "real" camp experience.

 

Anyway, feedback?  Or other camp options?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Have you all sent your kids to any gluten-free sleepaway camps? 

 

My oldest has gone to Girl Scout camp the past two summers, but there is NO way I trust their standards in helping her with her diet and providing suitable alternatives.  I did try to contact them with questions (left a message and an email - both with no response) because I told her I would, but still doubt I would send her there.

 

So I've been looking online and trying to find her a place to go.  For the record, we are a midwestern family that has been grooming our kids for New England camp since in utero!  Anyway, I found Camp Eagle Hill and it looks awesome.  Seriously - it's a lot of what we were looking for before the DX and now it looks even better with a dedicated gluten-free kitchen and a dedicated chef.  Plus the director's daughter has celiac (I read that on another site).  I also ran across Camp Weekaneatit - through the Georgia ROCK chapter.  My worry about that is that it's not a "real" camp experience.

 

Anyway, feedback?  Or other camp options?

 

I can't help you with New England camps, but we sent my son to one of the Concordia Language Village camps in Minnesota last summer.  They did a great job with his food, even though the camps are set up around family-style eating.  They let him know which dishes he could and could not eat, and the chef prepared gluten-free alternatives for him for the ones he couldn't eat off the shared plates.  He went to the Japanese camp and had a great time. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter went to a camp with school.  They said they could accomodate her diet.  And while she didn't get sick there, she certainly did come home very hungy!  And she ate far more apples than she cared to remember.  The problems?  The other kids got snacks.  She didn't.  And they wouldn't even allow me to send food for her.  The other kids made S'Mores around the campfire and while I could have sent her suitable food, it was not allowed.  They were also given candy bars on hikes.  Nothing for her.  Note that her issues at the time were not just gluten but eggs, dairy, nuts and other things.  Mostly she had plain chicken breast and rice pasta, salad, bread and apples to eat.  She was given the choice one day of a sunseed butter or tuna sandwich.

 

At this particular camp, some parents could attend but...  They were required to help out.  And me being disabled and also a diabetic who was newly on insulin and using a CPAP machine, I decided this just wouldn't work on so many levels.  I also have food issues myself that were different than hers so...  Husband went instead.  Had I gone, I would for sure have sneaked food for her. 

 

If the camp is truly totally gluten free, then I would feel much more comfortable about sending my kid there than I would a place like she went to. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I can give you some good perspective on this! My 11 year old was diagnosed in mid-April - about 2 weeks after we signed her up to go to the same church camp she had been to the two previous years, and this time her best friend was going with her. All of her tears when she was first diagnosed were about camp and whether she could still go. I called the camp and they said that I could send food for her. Then I started searching for a gluten-free camp because we were trying really hard to get her over the initial hump of diagnosis. We found Camp Weekaneatit, and registered her for that as well.

 

Her church camp was less than successful. She basically starved all week, and what she did eat that was supposedly gluten-free gave her some stomach issues (and she has always been GI-issue free). We took a lot of food for her, but she didn't want to appear different and basically subsisted on salad. Needless to say, until she can advocate better for herself she is not going back there. BUT....she is okay with that because she LOVED Camp Weekaneatit! Yes, it's a little bit of a different camp experience and not as rustic and "woodsy" as her other camp, and my vision of camp. But it's got a lot going for it and she constantly talks about things they did there. She did everything from climbing walls to paddle boards to bowling. And it was a great experience for her as a newly diagnosed Celiac. She will be going again next summer, and the 10 hour drive from Virginia is definitely worth it!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What activities did she do at Weekaneatit?  I'm willing to drive the 10 hours - just want to make sure it's worth it. 

 

How many kids attend?  Are they mostly older?

 

Thanks!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




I can't remember how many kids attended - maybe 75? I know they have room for more than they had. My daughter says that they were spread from ages 6 and 7 up to high school. There were multiple groups in the 10-11-12 age group but the rest were pretty evenly dispersed.

 

They did lots of different activities. Off the top of my head, there was a climbing wall, paddle boarding, paddle boating, and bowling. They also have a one day "color war" where the camp is divided into two colors and they do activities/contests all day. She really had fun that day. The closing ceremony/presentation including a lot of singing and chanting.  She came home exhausted, and after an hour sleeping in the car woke up sobbing because she didn't want camp to be over. When I say it's not a real camp experience, I think it's because they aren't living in cabins in the woods.....they are more in dorm like settings with 6 or 8 kids and a counselor in each room.

 

We definitely feel it was worth our 10 hour drive. As a new Celiac at age 11, my daughter tends to really worry when she's eating away from home. I think to not worry at all for a week was the biggest blessing she could have. And she can't wait to go back next year!

 

I could e-mail you the slide show that they did at the closing ceremony and then e-mailed all of us if you are interested. If so, please send me a private message with your e-mail address and I'll send it to you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We haven't yet (my oldest just isn't quite ready yet), but we plan to send him to Camp Celiac in Rhode Island when he is.  I've heard great things about it and it's an entirely gluten-free camp for a week that lists every single food they serve on their website.  I think it will be great for him, when the time comes.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We interviewed two camps last week - one in NY and one in NH.  Both are 4-7 weeks.  The oldest would *love* them.  So we're still debating.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter went to camp celiac for a week in Rhode Island. I think registration starts in Feb. She really liked meeting other kids with celiac and it made her more sure of herself. It's pretty much a regular camp other than everyone has celiac.

 

http://campceliac.org/

 

Sarah

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son's camp has 6 celiac kids and a dedicated food prep area for them. They prepared a great meal for me on visiting day! That said, my son said a friend got glutened badly on a field trip (asked carefully at snack bar but got hit anyway - I'm sure camp will send snacks next year)

Just saying many camps are aware now. Ask.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      103,394
    • Total Posts
      917,605
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Can treatment for Giardia reverse active Celiac
      I haven’t found any large scale studies on this, but only a handful of individual case reports suggesting that in rare cases giardia can temporarily mimic celiac (both the serology & villous atrophy) until it is treated.   I think this is a  complex matter as giardia effects patients differently (most are asymptomatic whilst others suffer from chronic symptoms including malabsorption) for reasons that may not be well understood. In my case - My GI agrees that Giardia can directly cause villous atrophy that cannot be distinguished from Celiac.  As the healing of the villi can be a slow process, I will schedule a repeat endoscopy 6-12 months after my giardia was treated.   Ttg antibodies can also take 6-12+months to completely normalise, especially if the starting levels are high. 6 months would have elapsed at the end of this month, so will schedule a repeat test, hoping for a normal Ttg result to prove the theory.   I have decided to remain on a normal gluten diet until it can be proven that I’m a celiac and not just suffering from a giardia infection.  I have reason to be optimistic as my Gliadin IgA levels are negative (not iga deficient) and also given the sharp decrease in ttg levels 4 weeks after giardia was treated.
    • celiac disease is psychosomatic
      It took all of 3 years before ALL of my symptoms resolved and it was the neuro ones that were the last to go.  If you have been careful about your diet, then you may not be getting glutened as much as you think.  It sounds like you have been careful because you are questioning things you should question to get clarification on.  I am sure if you were doubtful, you would refrain from eating something until you know for sure. Neuro symptoms can last for much longer than other symptoms.  Please be patient because my last neuro symptom was the one that took 3 years.  Have you been tested for vitamin deficiencies?  The B vitamins are important for neuro health, especially B12.
    • Week late aftershock!?
      I had a similar problem, I was glutened after a meal out at the beginning of April and am still experiencing problems, obviously not as bad now, but bad enough.  I have also become intolerant to  xanthan gum since, which cuts down the foods I can eat even more. I'm already intolerant to dairy, soya, and a whole lot of other stuff.  Cyclinglady is right about the auto-immune disorders, and I've noticed I have similar problems to her.  I too, eat easy to digest foods until the glutening symptoms pass. The sinus infection might also be a reaction to the glutening, it effects people in different ways.
    • celiac disease is psychosomatic
      Thanks, I'll check out the information in the link. Do you remember how long you were on a gluten-free diet before your vertigo disappeared? I have been on the diet for 2 years, but I might be glutened from time to time since I am not an expert food label reader. My dizziness still persists.
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

    • Larry Gessner  »  cyclinglady

      Hi There, I don't know if there is a place for videos in the forum. I just watched "The Truth About Gluten" I think it is a good video. I would like to share it somewhere but don't know where it should go. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      Here is the link if you have never watched it.
      https://youtu.be/IU6jVEwpjnE Thank You,
      Larry
      · 2 replies
    • ChiaChick  »  Peaceflower

      Hi Peaceflower, Just wanted to say thank you for the chat.
      · 0 replies
    • ukuleleerika

      Hello! I am new to this Celiac website... Is there anyone out there with Celiac AND extensive food allergies? My allergies include shellfish, dairy, eggs, cantaloupe, kiwi, mango, nuts, oranges, red dye, and more I can't think of. I went to the allergist about a year ago to see why I wasn't feeling well, and once everything was eliminated, I still didn't feel well. We did more testing to find out I had celiac as well as allergies to cattle as well as rye grass (I live on a farm basically). This was back in January 2016. I recently had my endoscopy with the gastroenterologist a week ago. I have no idea what to do or what to eat... So fish and potatoes for me!
      · 2 replies
  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      60,527
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    MBrooks985
    Joined