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Elk Roast
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Ok, so the same guy who gave me all that bison a few weeks ago just brought me an elk roast. How do I cook it? I know it's very lean and should be cooked in a crock pot. All the recipes I saw on line include things I can't have. Should I just use carrots seeing I am off nightshades? And they say to sear it in vegetable oil first. Well, olive oil doesn't seem to work for me. Can I use butter? I haven't even tested coconut oil yet but it seems I'm intolerant to so many things, I'd hate to try it and find out I ruined the whole roast for myself. Do I really have to sear it at all?

 

They say to cut slits in the roast and put a bunch of butter in it. I guess I can do that. They also say I'll end up with a bunch of juices to make gravy. I can thicken it with rice flour, right? Because I can't do corn starch.

 

How about spices? I've never had elk before, but I've heard it is the best of all wild game meats. What spices would go good with it? Or should I just cook it plain?

 

He brought me a bunch of ground elk too. THAT I know how to cook - the same way I cook my ground bison. :)

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I love elk. What kind (cut) of roast is it?

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I don't know. I forgot to ask him. It's in a vacuum-sealed package and it's kind of oblong but sort of flat. Maybe five inches wide, seven or eight inches long, and three inches thick.

 

(And by the way, I was hoping it's be you who answered. I KNOW anything you suggest will come out delicious. Just go easy on me - remember I have NO experience cooking a roast of ANY kind and I'm pretty helpless in the kitchen. :) )

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I don't know. I forgot to ask him. It's in a vacuum-sealed package and it's kind of oblong but sort of flat. Maybe five inches wide, seven or eight inches long, and three inches thick.

 

(And by the way, I was hoping it's be you who answered. I KNOW anything you suggest will come out delicious. Just go easy on me - remember I have NO experience cooking a roast of ANY kind and I'm pretty helpless in the kitchen. :) )

You are too sweet. :-) When are you having this roast? The reason I ask is I am wondering whether I can fully respond to you tomorrow. Tweaked my back so even the simplest tasks seem daunting. :-(

Elk truly is amongst the best game and I have pretty much had it all! Yummmm...

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It's frozen. I don't have to cook it until I'm feeling brave. :lol:

 

And I'm so sorry to hear you have hurt your back (again? or should I say "some more"?) I know you are in constant pain, and yet you are always so cheerful. You are an example we should all hold up and try to emulate. (((((HUGS)))))

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It's frozen. I don't have to cook it until I'm feeling brave. :lol:

 

And I'm so sorry to hear you have hurt your back (again? or should I say "some more"?) I know you are in constant pain, and yet you are always so cheerful. You are an example we should all hold up and try to emulate. (((((HUGS)))))

Some more AND again! Anyway, what you said made my day. And I mean that sincerely. Thank you!
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I've never cooked elk myself, so I have nothing constructive to add. I just wanted to say that I've eaten it and it is absolutely amazing. My dad will shoot anything he can get a license for, so I've had quite a lot of wild game and buffalo and elk are definitely at the top of my list.

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You really do not have to sear big roasts before they go in the crock pot.  I feel like it is too much of a pain in the rear. I do not know how to cook elk but I have thickened gravy with rice flour before.  Just make a roux with equal parts rice flour and fat.  

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I would probably sear it in some animal fat - tallow or lard or duckfat. Butter will likely brown too quickly. Ghee might work, though.

 

Something like this recipe:http://www.rmef.org/TheHunt/After/CarnivoresKitchen/Recipes/Slow-CookedGarlicandHerb-StuddedElkRoast.aspx

 

If you cannot so the wine, just up the broth amount (or I have used a little Pom juice before with yummy results)

 

If the meat is good, you don't need too add too much. Simple and tasty!

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yummmm - wrap that sucker in bacon and pop it in the oven :)  sounds like tenderloin?  backstrap?  doesn't matter, elk is dee-licious!  i've only had it a few times - once was an elk burger.

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I looked up pictures and it looks like "sirloin tip center", which they suggest roasting. (Which I was going to do anyway. Do you call it roasting when you do it in a slow cooker?)

 

My problem is the fat. Can't get lard around here that isn't adulterated with _______  CORN! :angry:

Can't get bacon around here that isn't contaminated with _______ CORN! :angry:

All I can think of to do would be to cook some chicken and save the fat from that.

 

I was thinking ginger might be a good thing to spice it with. A friend of mine used to make the best sauerbratten. He used wine (which I can't have), and ginger snaps!. It was delicious, and so tender. I wonder if I can find some gluten-free ginger snaps that aren't poisoned with ______CORN! :angry: Or soy. :angry:

 

And broth? I'll have to make my own from the chicken because I can't get BROTH around here that isn't totally ruined with _______CORN!!!! :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:

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Homemade broth is way better anyway! I save all my chicken bones, back n carcasses and pick up a bunch of chicken feet (makes it really gelatine-y)

 

Have you heard of US Wellness Meats? You can buy all grass fed, grain free meats and fats there. They have tallow and lard:http://www.grasslandbeef.com/Detail.bok?no=878 It ain't cheap, but it's corn free!

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I looked up pictures and it looks like "sirloin tip center", which they suggest roasting. (Which I was going to do anyway. Do you call it roasting when you do it in a slow cooker?)

 

My problem is the fat. Can't get lard around here that isn't adulterated with _______  CORN! :angry:

Can't get bacon around here that isn't contaminated with _______ CORN! :angry:

All I can think of to do would be to cook some chicken and save the fat from that.

 

I was thinking ginger might be a good thing to spice it with. A friend of mine used to make the best sauerbratten. He used wine (which I can't have), and ginger snaps!. It was delicious, and so tender. I wonder if I can find some gluten-free ginger snaps that aren't poisoned with ______CORN! :angry: Or soy. :angry:

 

And broth? I'll have to make my own from the chicken because I can't get BROTH around here that isn't totally ruined with _______CORN!!!! :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:  :angry:

Have you tried a local butcher to see if you can get a corn free bacon?

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There IS no local butcher. I guess I can live without bacon (unless I think about it too much).

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Sorry not to respond sooner. Pain worse. Will get back to you when I can! Elk does need additional fat as mentioned above. Is it possible to request caul fat from the meat section at your store? It is a very thin layer that resembles lace.

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I'll try but I doubt it. These stores here are pretty bleak.

 

I'm so sorry the pain has gotten worse! I'll be sending my thoughts and prayers your way.

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I would still try.  All beef has caul fat and I'm guessing it usually gets tossed (or taken home by the butcher!) so you're bound to have some somewhere.  I know what it is like living in the sticks.  We live in a decent-sized town but in a very rural area with the nearest city three hours' drive away.  We used to live up so far north that it was literally where the road ended in Saskatchewan.  Beautiful area, just stunning, but even colder than here and quite dangerous.  People got banished to an isolated island for punishment rather than spend time in prison for certain crimes.  Anywhere further north and you had to fly (like I did on tiny planes for my work at a hospital on a reserve).

 

Anyway, back to elk.  :P   As mentioned, it does need fat, either by barding (you likely don't have a barding needle) or by using caul fat or even bacon or even roasting and coating with melted butter every now and then.  Is your slow cooker your only option?  I would definitely soak the meat in buttermilk overnight (in case it is gamey) and remove all moisture and then rub with a dry rub for several hours (i.e. a chili blend with some coffee grains or cacao - I recall you liked chocolate with beef - same idea here) is very nice.  I'm a searer.  You do not absolutely need to sear but it sure helps develop flavour.  It elevates a good roast to a great roast.  You can do this simply in a cast iron skillet.  Doesn't take long.  Or do you just want to skip all the good stuff and toss it into the slow cooker?

 

What flavour profile are you looking for? 

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I don't have to use the slow cooker. It would warm the house up if I used the oven. :)

 

I seem to have a problem with chocolate (even gluten-free, soy-free, corn-free chocolate), so I was thinking ginger might be nice.

 

If I can't get any of the caul fat, would chicken fat do?

 

Buttermilk is something I can probably get here. Could I do the dry rub with powdered ginger? I am off nightshades so the chili is out. I also don't have a cast iron pan. As a matter of fact, the only frying pan of a decent size I own is pyrex, and I'm not supposed to get that really hot. Maybe I can fit it in the small stainless pan. How long do I have to sear each side?

 

Sorry to sound so clueless, but I AM clueless. :unsure:

 

And are you feeling better?

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OK.  Searing is out of the question as you need a piping hot pan.  BTW, I would really, really, REALLY recommend getting a cast iron skillet as it is so multi-purpose.  I use mine for everything from cornbread to roasting a chicken (which is far better than using a roaster as those basically steam as opposed to roast) to roasting veg to cooking on the stovetop.  They are very inexpensive and keep for years and years.  To me they are crucial if you want to do any kind of cooking.  I could go on and on about it but won't bore you with the details.  :rolleyes:

 

So, you can do buttermilk.  If you cannot buy it, it is easy to make.  Just throw in 1 Tbsp of white vinegar or lemon juice into your measuring cup and pour in enough milk to get to 1 cup.  It really helps to soak in buttermilk overnight but this is not absolutely necessary.

 

I have books on just rubs so I'll find a few great choices for you.  And yes, you can use powdered ginger in a dry rub.  :)

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I found one online that sounds pretty good.

 

1 Tbsp. brown sugar

2 Tsp. ground ginger

1 Tsp. ground cloves

1/2 Tsp. cinnamon

1/2 Tsp black pepper.

 

I like the idea of a kind of sweet flavor. A friend of mine makes the best sauerbraten I ever tasted, and he uses gingersnaps(!) and wine, and he lets it marinate for DAYS. I'd love to get that flavor, although I can't use wine.

 

I know I will be using the cloves, along with some allspice and black pepper to cook up some of the ground elk (and bison). I may not be able to have my holiday pork pie, but I can mix it with some rice and pretend.

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Have been unable to access this site for the past few days but now that I am here your elk roast was the first thought on my mind!  So, I have a few rub ideas:

 

Basic Rub (makes scant 1/2 cup)

 

2 T hot paprika

1T cayenne

1 t dried thyme

1 t dried oregano

1 t freshly-ground black pepper

1 T coarse salt

1 T garlic powder

1 T onion powder

 

 

Rosemary Seasoning Rub (makes 1/2 cup)

 

1/4 c fresh ch rosemary

2 t coarse salt

1 T freshly-ground black pepper

1/4 t cayenne

1 t dry mustard powder

1 t dried oregano

1 t garlic powder

 

Grind to a fine powder.

 

 

Basic Southern Barbecue Rub (makes 1 cup)

 

1/4 c dark brown sgar

2 T coarse salt

1/4 c whole black peppercorns

1/4 c hot paprika

1 T dry mustard

1 T onion powder

2 T garlic powder

1 t cayenne

 

Combine all and grind to fine powder.  OR just use coarse pepper instead of peppercorns.

 

 

Please let me know if you are interested in marinades or glazes or wet rubs.  One of my favourite glazes is Maple Bourbon.  Oh, and Plum-Cassis Glaze.  Fruity things go extremely well with game.  As you mentioned ginger...

 

 

Honey Ginger Glaze (makes 1 cup)

 

grated zest and juice of 2 lemons (about 1/3 cup)

1/3 cup honey

2 T ch fresh mint

3 T freshly-grated ginger

2 cloves garlic, ch

 

 

Raspberry-Beaujolais Marinade (makes 3 3/4 cups)

 

1 12-oz. bag frozen unsweetened raspberries, defrosted

1 c Beaujolais or other light red wine

grated zest and juice 1 orange (about 1/3 cup)

2 T soy sauce

2 or 3 cloves garlic, ch

1/4 c ch green onions

1 bay leaf, crumbled

2 or 3 whole cloves, crumbled

1 t coarsely ground pepper

1 t coarse salt

1/2 t ground coriander

1/2 t ground nutmeg

1/4 c light olive oil

 

Seems complex but not.  Do you have a food processor or blender?  If so, process the berries.  Strain the seeds if you want then return to food pro or blender.  Add the rest except oil.  Then add oil gradually and process.  Marinate the elk in this for 8-12 hours.

 

 

Apple Cider Marinade

 

4 c apple cider

1/4 c cider vinegar

1 T dijon

1 T apple butter or honey

1 t coarsely ground black pepper

1 t coarsely ground mustard seeds

2 shallots, diced (or onion - 1 1/2 T)

1 t coarse salt

1/4 c light olive or grapeseed oil

 

Bring cider to a boil and reduce to 1 1/2 cups.  Remove from heat and cool to room temp.

 

Combine it with the rest except oil and whisk in oil gradually.  (I shake in glass jars.)

 

 

Balsamic Ginger Marinade

 

5 or 6 cloves garlic, ch

1/4 peeled and ch fresh ginger

2-3 T ch shallot or onion

2 T dark soy

1 c balsamic (the cheap stuff)

1 T Dijon

1 t coarse salt

1 T pepper

1/4 cup any light oil

 

Combine all in blender but oil.  Add in gradually.  Marinate overnight.

 

 

I have so many hundreds of recipes I literally do not know where to begin! 

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Oh, that last one sounds like what I'm looking for! Thanks!! I'll have to leave out the soy and dijon, but I bet it'll still be good. I probably won't get to it until after Christmas. Things have gotten very busy all of a sudden - had to play guitar at a Christmas event last night and have more coming up. (I hate it when my Sundays off are taken up with stuff like that instead of naps. :lol: )

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