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Elk Roast

help?

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21 replies to this topic

#16 bartfull

 
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Posted 06 December 2013 - 01:09 PM

I'll try but I doubt it. These stores here are pretty bleak.

 

I'm so sorry the pain has gotten worse! I'll be sending my thoughts and prayers your way.


  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


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#17 love2travel

 
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Posted 08 December 2013 - 12:11 PM

I would still try.  All beef has caul fat and I'm guessing it usually gets tossed (or taken home by the butcher!) so you're bound to have some somewhere.  I know what it is like living in the sticks.  We live in a decent-sized town but in a very rural area with the nearest city three hours' drive away.  We used to live up so far north that it was literally where the road ended in Saskatchewan.  Beautiful area, just stunning, but even colder than here and quite dangerous.  People got banished to an isolated island for punishment rather than spend time in prison for certain crimes.  Anywhere further north and you had to fly (like I did on tiny planes for my work at a hospital on a reserve).

 

Anyway, back to elk.  :P   As mentioned, it does need fat, either by barding (you likely don't have a barding needle) or by using caul fat or even bacon or even roasting and coating with melted butter every now and then.  Is your slow cooker your only option?  I would definitely soak the meat in buttermilk overnight (in case it is gamey) and remove all moisture and then rub with a dry rub for several hours (i.e. a chili blend with some coffee grains or cacao - I recall you liked chocolate with beef - same idea here) is very nice.  I'm a searer.  You do not absolutely need to sear but it sure helps develop flavour.  It elevates a good roast to a great roast.  You can do this simply in a cast iron skillet.  Doesn't take long.  Or do you just want to skip all the good stuff and toss it into the slow cooker?

 

What flavour profile are you looking for? 


  • 0
<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#18 bartfull

 
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Posted 09 December 2013 - 10:14 AM

I don't have to use the slow cooker. It would warm the house up if I used the oven. :)

 

I seem to have a problem with chocolate (even gluten-free, soy-free, corn-free chocolate), so I was thinking ginger might be nice.

 

If I can't get any of the caul fat, would chicken fat do?

 

Buttermilk is something I can probably get here. Could I do the dry rub with powdered ginger? I am off nightshades so the chili is out. I also don't have a cast iron pan. As a matter of fact, the only frying pan of a decent size I own is pyrex, and I'm not supposed to get that really hot. Maybe I can fit it in the small stainless pan. How long do I have to sear each side?

 

Sorry to sound so clueless, but I AM clueless. :unsure:

 

And are you feeling better?


  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#19 love2travel

 
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Posted 09 December 2013 - 12:30 PM

OK.  Searing is out of the question as you need a piping hot pan.  BTW, I would really, really, REALLY recommend getting a cast iron skillet as it is so multi-purpose.  I use mine for everything from cornbread to roasting a chicken (which is far better than using a roaster as those basically steam as opposed to roast) to roasting veg to cooking on the stovetop.  They are very inexpensive and keep for years and years.  To me they are crucial if you want to do any kind of cooking.  I could go on and on about it but won't bore you with the details.  :rolleyes:

 

So, you can do buttermilk.  If you cannot buy it, it is easy to make.  Just throw in 1 Tbsp of white vinegar or lemon juice into your measuring cup and pour in enough milk to get to 1 cup.  It really helps to soak in buttermilk overnight but this is not absolutely necessary.

 

I have books on just rubs so I'll find a few great choices for you.  And yes, you can use powdered ginger in a dry rub.  :)


  • 1
<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#20 bartfull

 
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Posted 09 December 2013 - 12:46 PM

I found one online that sounds pretty good.

 

1 Tbsp. brown sugar

2 Tsp. ground ginger

1 Tsp. ground cloves

1/2 Tsp. cinnamon

1/2 Tsp black pepper.

 

I like the idea of a kind of sweet flavor. A friend of mine makes the best sauerbraten I ever tasted, and he uses gingersnaps(!) and wine, and he lets it marinate for DAYS. I'd love to get that flavor, although I can't use wine.

 

I know I will be using the cloves, along with some allspice and black pepper to cook up some of the ground elk (and bison). I may not be able to have my holiday pork pie, but I can mix it with some rice and pretend.


  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 


#21 love2travel

 
love2travel

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 10:38 AM

Have been unable to access this site for the past few days but now that I am here your elk roast was the first thought on my mind!  So, I have a few rub ideas:

 

Basic Rub (makes scant 1/2 cup)

 

2 T hot paprika

1T cayenne

1 t dried thyme

1 t dried oregano

1 t freshly-ground black pepper

1 T coarse salt

1 T garlic powder

1 T onion powder

 

 

Rosemary Seasoning Rub (makes 1/2 cup)

 

1/4 c fresh ch rosemary

2 t coarse salt

1 T freshly-ground black pepper

1/4 t cayenne

1 t dry mustard powder

1 t dried oregano

1 t garlic powder

 

Grind to a fine powder.

 

 

Basic Southern Barbecue Rub (makes 1 cup)

 

1/4 c dark brown sgar

2 T coarse salt

1/4 c whole black peppercorns

1/4 c hot paprika

1 T dry mustard

1 T onion powder

2 T garlic powder

1 t cayenne

 

Combine all and grind to fine powder.  OR just use coarse pepper instead of peppercorns.

 

 

Please let me know if you are interested in marinades or glazes or wet rubs.  One of my favourite glazes is Maple Bourbon.  Oh, and Plum-Cassis Glaze.  Fruity things go extremely well with game.  As you mentioned ginger...

 

 

Honey Ginger Glaze (makes 1 cup)

 

grated zest and juice of 2 lemons (about 1/3 cup)

1/3 cup honey

2 T ch fresh mint

3 T freshly-grated ginger

2 cloves garlic, ch

 

 

Raspberry-Beaujolais Marinade (makes 3 3/4 cups)

 

1 12-oz. bag frozen unsweetened raspberries, defrosted

1 c Beaujolais or other light red wine

grated zest and juice 1 orange (about 1/3 cup)

2 T soy sauce

2 or 3 cloves garlic, ch

1/4 c ch green onions

1 bay leaf, crumbled

2 or 3 whole cloves, crumbled

1 t coarsely ground pepper

1 t coarse salt

1/2 t ground coriander

1/2 t ground nutmeg

1/4 c light olive oil

 

Seems complex but not.  Do you have a food processor or blender?  If so, process the berries.  Strain the seeds if you want then return to food pro or blender.  Add the rest except oil.  Then add oil gradually and process.  Marinate the elk in this for 8-12 hours.

 

 

Apple Cider Marinade

 

4 c apple cider

1/4 c cider vinegar

1 T dijon

1 T apple butter or honey

1 t coarsely ground black pepper

1 t coarsely ground mustard seeds

2 shallots, diced (or onion - 1 1/2 T)

1 t coarse salt

1/4 c light olive or grapeseed oil

 

Bring cider to a boil and reduce to 1 1/2 cups.  Remove from heat and cool to room temp.

 

Combine it with the rest except oil and whisk in oil gradually.  (I shake in glass jars.)

 

 

Balsamic Ginger Marinade

 

5 or 6 cloves garlic, ch

1/4 peeled and ch fresh ginger

2-3 T ch shallot or onion

2 T dark soy

1 c balsamic (the cheap stuff)

1 T Dijon

1 t coarse salt

1 T pepper

1/4 cup any light oil

 

Combine all in blender but oil.  Add in gradually.  Marinate overnight.

 

 

I have so many hundreds of recipes I literally do not know where to begin! 


  • 0
<p>Confirmed celiac disease February 2011 from biopsies. Strictly gluten free March 18 2011.Diagnosed with fibromyalgia April 13 2011.3 herniated discs, myofascial pain syndrome, IT band syndrome, 2 rotator cuff injuries - from an accident Dec. 07 - resulting in chronic pain ever since. Degenerative disc disease.Osteoarthritis in back and hips.Chronic insomnia mostly due to chronic pain.Aspartame free May 2011.

When our lives are squeezed by pressure and pain, what comes out is what is inside.

#22 bartfull

 
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Posted 16 December 2013 - 01:04 PM

Oh, that last one sounds like what I'm looking for! Thanks!! I'll have to leave out the soy and dijon, but I bet it'll still be good. I probably won't get to it until after Christmas. Things have gotten very busy all of a sudden - had to play guitar at a Christmas event last night and have more coming up. (I hate it when my Sundays off are taken up with stuff like that instead of naps. :lol: )


  • 0

gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

BUT I CAN STILL PLAY MY GUITAR AND THAT"S ALL THAT MATTERS!

 






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