Get email alerts Get Celiac.com E-mail Alerts  




Celiac.com Sponsor:
Celiac.com Sponsor:




Ads by Google:






   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

My Son Needs Help.....
0

14 posts in this topic

Hi Folks:

 

I am new to the celiac disease world.  My son was colic when he was a baby and no w at 15just found out he has celiac disease.  The day we found out, it was like a big relief to him.  He was happy, for once.

He was feeling like crap for this many years.  Poor kid!  On to a new chapter and hopefully a better one.  It seems as though he gets more depressed every day.  He doesn't want to go to school.  He knows we cannot fathom the idea of going out to eat.  We order gluten free pizza and on the box it reads "made in a gluten infested facility" so he doesn't want to eat that.  His attitude sucks.  Crabby and sometimes even mean to others.  He has missed so much school because he never feels good.  What can I do to make him feel better?  I need help.  I want my son to live life to the fullest and it seems it is just going down the tubes.  He is on an anti-depressant (Setraline which is like Zoloff).  This is the only one the psycologist will give him due to his age.

He refuses to eat any fruits or vegetables because of the texture.  I buy gluten free crackers and cookies.  He will not even try them.  I will make a gluten free meal for all of us and sometimes he won't even eat it telling me he does not like it.  I am angry and frustrated.  I want to have him talk to someone professionally but don't even know where to start looking.  Help?????

 

Brenda in Wisconsin

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:

Poor kid!

 

First of all, depression is one of the many symptoms of celiac. And on top of that, because he isn't absorbing things, he's not getting the full benefit of his meds. As he starts to heal not only will the meds work better, but he may find that he doesn't need them at all. Seratonin is made in the small intestine, and his is damaged. As it heals he'll start making it and his mood will improve.

 

Now, for the diet. It is a VERY hard adjustment for adults to make, but for a depressed teenager it has got to be worse. I think every one of us here had meltdowns at first. So let him have his period of mourning/anger/distress.

 

But he HAS to eat! Find him some good gluten-free bread. Udi's is good, and Canyon Bakehouse is even better. There are also good gluten-free pizzas on the market. I like Against The Grain. It'll be different from what he's used to, but after a while he'll start to like it. If he doesn't like fruits and veggies (neither do I), maybe you can chop them really finely and mix them into other foods. For instance, you can buy gluten-free pasta and put some finely chopped broccoli into the sauce.

 

You can get gluten-free pie crust and make him a sweet potato pie - tastes like pumpkin pie but with lots more nutrition. Some gluten-free cookies are pretty bad, but if he likes chocolate, get him some Udi's Double Chocolate muffins. They are beyond good! I mean, they are more delicious than any gluten chocolate cake type thing I've ever had. And if you could get him to try some of those crackers I know he'd be pleasantly surprised. Crackers are easy to make gluten-free and delicious at the same time.

 

Also, if you go to the breakfast/lunch/dinner threads here you will find recipes posted for just about anything you can imagine.

 

AND! He can still eat ice cream and potato chips. A healthier snack would be nuts. I buy the giant economy size can of Planter's (a brand that is safe) cashews because I eat a LOT of them.

 

Have you been to the Newbie 101 page yet? It's in the coping section here, and it will give you lots of tips on keeping him safe from cross-contamination.

 

So yeah, give him time, give him some of his favorite snacks that are already gluten-free, sneak some veggies in when you can, and watch his depression lift.

 

And give him a (((((HUG))))) from me.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gluten withdrawl is another reason.

 

What were some of his favorite gluten containing foods? Most can be made gluten free.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi BKBoerst,

 

It is probably going to take a while for his gut to heal.  Months to a year or more.  I suggest you take it easy on the processed gluten-free foods at first.  A simple diet of whole or minimally processed foods is much easier to digest and less likely to be irritating to the gut.  It is also simpler to avoid gluten if you use whole foods instead of processed foods.  When people start the gluten-free diet, they often have bad reactions to many foods.  The gut is damaged and irritated, and not much makes that feel good when thrown at it.  Spicy foods are a bad idea.   It might help to get him to tell you what foods he likes to eat.  Eating lots of protein can help with healing, as the body needs protein to rebuild tissues.

 

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.
Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.
Don't eat in restaurants
Eat only whole foods not processed foods.
Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.
Take probiotics.
Take gluten-free vitamins.
Take digestive enzymes.
Avoid dairy.
Avoid sugars and starchy foods.
Avoid alcohol.
Watch out for cross contamination.

Helpful threads:

FAQ Celiac com
http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101
http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Hi Brenda,

 

Welcome - there are so many stories shared on this forum that shed light on our own circumstances and help guide us. Your son is very lucky to have a concerned mom looking out for his best interests.

 

I thought I might add to the great advice given above. I wondered if perhaps your son is feeling as if things are beyond his control and overwhelming at the same time. As a teenager, I wonder if he might be interested in investigating the Paleo "diet". It might place control, ownership and confidence back into his own hands.

 

All the best

 

D

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep on, keeping on.  He is recovering from a serious disease which- Thankfully you have defined and can be managed with diet.  He is being careful in his food choices.  He probably feels really sick if he misses.  Also,  I know my appetite was slack at first.  Keep trying different vegetables as he needs them.   There is bound to be some he will like. I agree with stay away from factory processed for now.  Nuts are crunchy like crackers.  I make pancakes, muffins and pie crusts with nut flour.

 

Health to you and your family.

 

D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

His attitude is okay. You need to be more mindful of cross contamination (its a steep learning curve). Gluten free pizza made in a gluten facility is NOT safe for celiac. Flour dust is suspended in air for 24-48 hours contaminating everything. There is a lot to learn (for everyone involved) and it is overwhelming and he can't be too careful - or he will end up sick. He may be afraid to eat and rightfully so! Some people start with gluten-free nutritional supplement shakes.

He may need a 504 plan at school to protect him.

Your kitchen and pots and pans, cutting boards, utensils could be making him sick. He needs new dedicated wood and plastic, as gluten ones are contaminated because they are porous. Stainless steel and glass are okay.

You need to stop using any gluten flour or dry flour product mixes in your kitchen. He needs his own new gluten-free toaster.

Let him browse amazon for a paleo cookbook to pick out. The are some for kids. Paleo is the way to go, especially in the beginning while healing because most grains have a little bit of cc.

He is going to have to start learning how to prepare gluten-free foods for himself. So he should be encouraged and supported to try to make some recipes from a paleo cookbook.

As he heals his depression should lift.

I was able to get off all antidepressants after going gluten-free. Never felt so emotionally stable in my whole life.

Give him time and ask him what he wants.

Best wishes!

Greta

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where do you live?  Maybe you can offer him a long weekend trip to NYC to kick start his gluten free lifestyle - we have some really good restaurants here that he can eat at (Risotteria?  Bistango?), a small store dedicated to gluten-free only, where he can browse for safe foods, and I've recently learned (but haven't tried) an entirely gluten-free Crumbs cupcake bakery, among other options.  The trip can be a bribe, but he will also see the options out there and maybe you can hook up with some locals who know of Celiac teens here.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To echo what Nikki said....

My son (11), who is not celiac (but may be one day) and may be ncgi, went with me to a gluten-free restaurant.

He was totally psyched that he could eat anything in there and it was gluten-free and safe. What he REALLY liked, that I had no clue was an issue is that he could SHARE with me - that he wouldn't contaminate me or my food.

Tonight, we went to another restaurant that serves excellent gluten-free pizza as well as gluten pizza...and he ordered gluten-free so he could, in his words, "touch you without glutening you - I don't have to wash my hands".

So, it or may not be the diet. It may be the lifestyle or some other factor he can't express. Anyway, talking to other gluten-free teens may help. Being somewhere "safe" may help.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter was just dxd also and she wants to be part of everything, including taking everything out of the cupboards and marking it gluten-free or knowing that it wasn't. She also has been making her own lunches, simple things like a sandwich with Udi bread, yogurt, and fritos, or a salad. She is also meeting with a dietitian. I can only guess from how we feel as parents that every thing is a huge roller coaster that kids are even worse. They are used to a world that is fairly ordered and all of a sudden everything is upside down, add in hormones and you start looking for the nearest cliff... I hope things start getting better soon!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor kid!

 

First of all, depression is one of the many symptoms of celiac. And on top of that, because he isn't absorbing things, he's not getting the full benefit of his meds. As he starts to heal not only will the meds work better, but he may find that he doesn't need them at all. Seratonin is made in the small intestine, and his is damaged. As it heals he'll start making it and his mood will improve.

 

Now, for the diet. It is a VERY hard adjustment for adults to make, but for a depressed teenager it has got to be worse. I think every one of us here had meltdowns at first. So let him have his period of mourning/anger/distress.

 

But he HAS to eat! Find him some good gluten-free bread. Udi's is good, and Canyon Bakehouse is even better. There are also good gluten-free pizzas on the market. I like Against The Grain. It'll be different from what he's used to, but after a while he'll start to like it. If he doesn't like fruits and veggies (neither do I), maybe you can chop them really finely and mix them into other foods. For instance, you can buy gluten-free pasta and put some finely chopped broccoli into the sauce.

 

You can get gluten-free pie crust and make him a sweet potato pie - tastes like pumpkin pie but with lots more nutrition. Some gluten-free cookies are pretty bad, but if he likes chocolate, get him some Udi's Double Chocolate muffins. They are beyond good! I mean, they are more delicious than any gluten chocolate cake type thing I've ever had. And if you could get him to try some of those crackers I know he'd be pleasantly surprised. Crackers are easy to make gluten-free and delicious at the same time.

 

Also, if you go to the breakfast/lunch/dinner threads here you will find recipes posted for just about anything you can imagine.

 

AND! He can still eat ice cream and potato chips. A healthier snack would be nuts. I buy the giant economy size can of Planter's (a brand that is safe) cashews because I eat a LOT of them.

 

Have you been to the Newbie 101 page yet? It's in the coping section here, and it will give you lots of tips on keeping him safe from cross-contamination.

 

So yeah, give him time, give him some of his favorite snacks that are already gluten-free, sneak some veggies in when you can, and watch his depression lift.

 

And give him a (((((HUG))))) from me.

Thank you so much for the info.  I definitely will give him a hug.  I am so looking forward to the day he is actually healed and happy.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for listening to my story.  Your information will help me and my son learn more about this disease.  I am going to check into this Paleo cookbook.  I did not know that I even have to dedicate utensils to my cooking.  Will do.  I wish we could take a vacation but.... just started a new business and the finances are not there right now.  I think I will take him to a movie today and spend some quality time with him after we go shopping for new utensils
~Is it safe to buy gluten free pizzas from a local grocers deli?  I am going to get on the mall and check out some of the gluten free products they have to offer.

Thanks again.

Brenda from Wisconsin

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for listening to my story.  Your information will help me and my son learn more about this disease.  I am going to check into this Paleo cookbook.  I did not know that I even have to dedicate utensils to my cooking.  Will do.  I wish we could take a vacation but.... just started a new business and the finances are not there right now.  I think I will take him to a movie today and spend some quality time with him after we go shopping for new utensils

~Is it safe to buy gluten free pizzas from a local grocers deli?  I am going to get on the mall and check out some of the gluten free products they have to offer.

Thanks again.

Brenda from Wisconsin

It is not safe unless they specifically say they are made in a dedicated facility. That kind of product generally caters to fad dieters rather than celiacs. To give you an example of how bad it is, if I touched a surface that I ate cookies on over 9 months ago (before I was diagnosed) and touch my mouth then I will get sick. This actually recently happened.

 

You need to check everything. Even his shampoos, soaps and anything that would somehow find its way into his mouth. You need to scrub down your kitchen and replace everything with a porous surface and any small appliances that have plastic that comes directly in contact with food. You need to all train yourselves to wash your hands before you touch any food that he will eat. If you touch a surface that could have been contaminated, rewash them.

 

Never assume something is gluten free, dig around on the internet until you find something on the company site that says it is. You wouldn't believe the things that have gluten in them. I've found an orange soda I used to drink that had a type of flour in it. I'd really love to find out who puts this stuff in these products.

 

I'd also suggest giving his sheets a wash or at least switching out his pillow case. New kitchen towels are a good idea as well.

 

Give him time, the combination of losing a food that is a big staple of our diets, being a teen and having to deal with a chronic illness and the gluten and probably carb/refined sugar withdrawal is really hard. It really helps to know that there are a lot of people out there going through the exact same thing. You may need to help him figure school (like GretaJane said, except I have no clue what a 504 is, maybe not a thing in Canada?), because it took so long to diagnose my Celiac Disease I missed a number of years of high school and its a real pain finishing it now (I'm 20 and really just want to move onto secondary education).

 

Best of luck :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      104,091
    • Total Posts
      920,311
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Thanks for posting this Adrien, it's a great list and I and others will appreciate the effort and the thought behind it. I loved my time in Malaysia and I'm glad I sampled all the food I could whilst I was still on an unrestricted diet. The good thing is that, like you say, some of the nice Malay foods are still ok. As a backpacker I survived on a lot of nasi goreng and laksa, nice to think if I return there I could still do the same Terima kasih!
    • I have posted on here before. DQ2, brother with celiac, DGP iGA was the only mildly elevated test. Was gluten-free so did 6 week challenge last winter. Negative biopsy. I am gluten-free now but do go out to eat. Prior to the challenge my health was good. Since then I have: Chest pain, pain between shoulder blades, periods of shortness of breath, heart palpitations, one instance of a heart arrythmia episode, neck is tender to touch on one side (they kept saying sinuses or TMJ which my dentist vetoed) ear ache, bowels never sink. Numbness and tingling. Blood pressure variations. Could be doing chores and feel dizzy and it might be 84/52.  not super low, but not typical for me if I'm running around the house.While other days I am mildly hypertensive. Recently lost 5 lbs in 8 days without trying. Recently electrolytes were low, alkaline phosphatese was low. Ferritin started dropping so started liquid iron 2-3 times per day 4 months ago. Primary watching that, I am not anemic but we are nowhere near iron overload either.  GI doc was a dick. Did not even know DGP replaced older tests and he was very condescending When I begged him for help recently and told me to get a second opinion which is exactly what I plan on doing.  I now have pain in my upper GI area. It is tender to touch. I had my gallbladder out in 97 along with a stone and infection in my bile duct. It hurts in this area. Pancreatic enzymes look fine, liver enzymes fine. Pancreatic ultrasound fine. I will now be doing a EUS Soon to look at bile duct, pancreas and liver.   so a typical day for me is that I might feel fine for a while and then suddenly feel like I'm going to pass out. really dizzy, numbness in odd places, like my body has been hijacked. I will typically eat a bunch of food something high protein and in about an hour or so I start to feel better. However, then my upper stomach starts to hurt in place of the passing out feeling. blood sugars are also normal. After getting the " it must be panic attacks" and condescending looks a million times my primary finally ordered an ultrasound of my sore neck and there is an abnormality in my thyroid which she says looks like possibly Hashti's. Except for one time, all my serum TSH tests were normal. We have more blood work on Monday. As I have not put on any weight and there are other symptoms that are closer to Graves.  Has anyone else had any thyroid issues that followed doing a gluten challenge?  where is your stomach pain? Do you have it above or below your belly button? Mine feels like it's in the pancreas area, like 2-3 inches above the belly button and when I push on it it's tender, but not all the time. sometimes i feel it in my back. 
    • Thanks for sharing with me.  I really appreciate it.  Honestly, after a glutening last summer (still do not know what glutened me), I did not eat out for a year!  The risk was too great as my healing time took 3 months (for symptoms to subside) and six months to regain lost weight.  Our recent vacation to Europe was worth the risk  as we traveled with our entire extended family, but we were extra cautious and ate only at celiac-approved places.  Otherwise, we "dined" at markets or ate the food we brought from home.  Thankfully, we did not get glutened (at least we don't think so!)  
    • I do not struggle with this and I was brought up the same way as you. I don't struggle because for many years off & on we didn't have a bathtub, only showers as well as this being therapy or medicinal for the skin - heck even for the muscles as I age. I figure I've earned my right to luxuriate or medicate with baths any time I've a mind to. My husband saw just how bad my dh got & NEVER begrudges me a nice long soak in the big soaking tub we now have.
    • Hi, No, I do not have celiac  disease. I have an ankylosing spondylitis which is an auto-immune disease provoking an inflammation of the joints. Under the advice and supervision of my doctor and the professor at the hospital I follow a gluten free & casein free diet, which is extremely successful in preventing inflammatory events. And I've been doing so, strictly, for more than 6 years. So I'm not Celiac, but I can tell you that I react strongly every time I take gluten even in small amounts. Even soya sauce, which according to this website has an almost zero dose of gluten, is a lot too much for me. Nevertheless I allow myself to eat food which has been processed in a factory which processes gluten. To conclude, I would say that when you are travelling, especially in a country where celiac disease is scarcely known, you should be twice as careful as when you're going out at home. In the end you can never guarantee that the cook has cleaned his pan after using soya sauce and so on... You can only bet
  • Upcoming Events

  • Blog Entries

  • Recent Status Updates

  • Who's Online (See full list)

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      61,121
    • Most Online
      1,763

    Newest Member
    Sambud
    Joined