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Enterolab Results


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#1 NanaV

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:29 PM

If you happened to have the following lab results for yourself, what conclusions would you draw and what actions might you take? 

 

 

B-1) Gluten Sensitivity Stool Panel

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA      30 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA      7 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score      Less than 300 Units   (Normal Range is less than 300 Units)

Gluten Sensitivity Gene Test

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1      0302   

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2      0301   

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ   3,3  (Subtype 8,7)


 

TEST INTERPRETATION(S):


Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA:  The level of intestinal anti-gliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicative of active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health; resolution or improvement of gluten-induced syndromes (mainly falling into six categories abbreviated as NAAAGS – neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, asthma, abdominal, glandular deficiencies/hyperactivity or skin diseases); resolution of symptoms known to be associated with gluten sensitivity (such as abdominal symptoms - pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation, chronic headaches, chronic sinus congestion, depression, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue); and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

For additional information on result interpretation, as well as educational information on the subject of gluten sensitivity, please see the "FAQ Result Interpretation," "FAQ Gluten/Food Sensitivity," and "Research & Education" links on our EnteroLab.com website.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA:  The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal. Hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction to this enzyme.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score:  Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no excessive malabsorbed dietary fat in stool, indicating that digestion and absorption of fat and other nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of HLA-DQ Testing:  HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac disease, in your case HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity, in your case HLA-DQB1*0301. Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene, and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe. This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by the American Red Cross - Northeast Division. It has not been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 


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#2 kareng

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:37 PM

I would go to my doctor and get tested for Celiac.


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#3 IrishHeart

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:45 PM

I would interpret nothing solid from those results, sorry :( I would have my doctor run a celiac panel.

 

There are no valid tests for "gluten sensitivity" at this time..

 

There are genes that are associated with  developing Celiac Disease  (HLA-DQ2 and DQ8)

but there are no "non-celiac genes".

 

From the Univ. of Chicago Celiac Disease Research Center:

 

Why don’t you recognize tests (stool tests or otherwise) for non-celiac gluten sensitivity that are currently available through companies like Enterolab or Cyrex?

We only embrace tests that have endured rigorous scientific evaluations. So far, these tests have received no evidence-based support.

Enterolab has never successfully published anything on the accuracy of stool tests (nor have any other stool test manufacturers, to our knowledge) making it difficult to confirm the research results. Because of this, we must make our decisions based on what has been published; Harvard, UCSD, and the American College of Gastroenterology all agree that stool tests are simply not sensitive or specific enough methods in screening for celiac disease.

We can say therefore with confidence that the test currently being used by these labs is not good enough. In fact, while it is true that about 40% of people with proven gluten sensitivity have elevated AGA-IgG, it is also true that about 15-25% of the healthy individuals who have absolutely nothing wrong also have elevated AGA-IgG. Hence, about 60% of gluten sensitive people do not have elevated AGA-IgG (making the test not sensitive enough); and about 20% of normal, non-gluten sensitive people have elevated AGA-IgG for no apparent reason (making the test not specific enough).

Further reading: “Detection of secretory IgA antibodies against gliadin and human tissue transglutaminase in stool to screen for coeliac disease in children: validation study” at BMJ.com.


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
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#4 IrishHeart

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:51 PM

Also, please read:

 

http://www.celiaccen...-and-diagnosis/

 

Currently, there are no recommended methods to test for non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Some doctors offer saliva, blood or stool testing. However, these tests have not been validated and are therefore not accepted.  

In NFCA’s webcast, Dr. Guandalini states:

“As a matter of fact, right now, they are to say that there is absolutely no biological readout that is no way can this diagnosis can be supported by any laboratory investigation. No antibodies in the blood are specific enough, or sensitive enough, for this condition. No antibodies in the stools can be utilized to diagnose or screen for this condition.”

Dr. Fasano also touched on this topic and stated that his team is currently conducting research to identify biomarkers that may help to test for and diagnose non-celiac gluten sensitivity:

 

“…as Dr. Guandalini explained when the only way to make a diagnosis of gluten sensitivity is by exclusionary criteria since we do not have tests that will point in that direction. And that’s where our current efforts are all about. Now that we understand that it is a different entity we want to make sure that we can eventually identify the biomarkers for this condition, and we’re doing a double blind study to identify the biomarkers that will eventually fill the gap that Dr. Guandalini was alluding to.” 


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif


#5 NanaV

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 05:44 PM

I would go to my doctor and get tested for Celiac.

Ok. Did that. Negative.


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#6 kareng

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 06:07 PM

Maybe try gluten free for a month or two and see if it helps? There is no other way, currently, to test for non-Celiac Gluten sensitivity. I know a couple of people who tested negative that found being gluten-free helpful.
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"You have problems.  There are not enough paper clips, and then you've got world hunger.  Your problems are somewhere in between." -DPR,III

 

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#7 NanaV

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 06:12 PM

I've been gluten-free for almost 2 years now, and I react strongly when I get accidentally glutened. I simply cannot cause harm to my body in order to get a certain test to run positive. This is why I chose Enterolab.


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#8 kareng

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 06:15 PM

I've been gluten-free for almost 2 years now, and I react strongly when I get accidentally glutened. I simply cannot cause harm to my body in order to get a certain test to run positive. This is why I chose Enterolab.


So, you tested negative after being gluten-free for a long time? If being gluten-free works for you...just continue.
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"You have problems.  There are not enough paper clips, and then you've got world hunger.  Your problems are somewhere in between." -DPR,III

 

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LTES

 

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#9 IrishHeart

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 04:21 AM

I've been gluten-free for almost 2 years now, and I react strongly when I get accidentally glutened. I simply cannot cause harm to my body in order to get a certain test to run positive. This is why I chose Enterolab.

 

I did not realize you've been G F and tested negative previously for C D or I would not have posted all that stuff for you.

I thought you just had the tests run because you were seeking a diagnosis of some sort.(and still on gluten)  Sorry about that!

 

Well, it sounds as if you have an answer, then. Gluten makes you feel sick so you really should avoid it..

 

But honestly, testing for anything 2 years

after being G F should not give you any results of any kind (even if the testing were valid)  No gluten = no gluten antibodies.

 

Best wishes!


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"Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way we cope with it makes the difference." Virginia Satir

"The strongest of all warriors are these two - time and patience." Leo Tolstoy

"If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else" Booker T. Washington

“If idiots could fly, the sky would be like an airport.”― Laura Davenport 

"Do or do not. There is no try. "-  Yoda.

"LTES"  Gem 2014

 

Misdiagnosed for 25+ years; Finally Diagnosed with Celiac  11/01/10.  Double DQ2 genes. This thing tried to kill me. I view Celiac as a fire breathing dragon --and I have run my sword right through his throat.
I. Win. bliss-smiley-emoticon.gif



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