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Gluten Free Kitchen
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I was diagnosed with Celiac's about 2 years ago. It has been a bumpy ride to feeling better. I am finally in a place where I can make my kitchen Gluten Free. The only problem I am really having is how do I really make my counter tops gluten free? I live in a rental and know for a fact that there has been gluten products used in the house and on the counters. To what I understand once you wipe down a counter with flour on it with a sponge that sponge is no longer safe to use no matter how well you have rinsed it out. To me it seems like a vicious cycle. Wipe the counter down, have a gluteny sponge and can't wipe down the cupboards.... 

 

If I use a sanitizer such as the one to sanitize the inside of beer bottles before bottling would that do the trick? It's totally food safe and doesn't require rinsing thus no sponge. However, I know that there are materials that can never be truly gluten free once they've been exposed. Is paint one of those? What about the veneer used on the counters? Or, do I simply grab my sponge wipe the whole kitchen down hoping that did the trick? 

 

At this point the task seems so overwhelming I really don't even know where to start. 

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I was diagnosed with Celiac's about 2 years ago. It has been a bumpy ride to feeling better. I am finally in a place where I can make my kitchen Gluten Free. The only problem I am really having is how do I really make my counter tops gluten free? I live in a rental and know for a fact that there has been gluten products used in the house and on the counters. To what I understand once you wipe down a counter with flour on it with a sponge that sponge is no longer safe to use no matter how well you have rinsed it out. To me it seems like a vicious cycle. Wipe the counter down, have a gluteny sponge and can't wipe down the cupboards.... 

 

If I use a sanitizer such as the one to sanitize the inside of beer bottles before bottling would that do the trick? It's totally food safe and doesn't require rinsing thus no sponge. However, I know that there are materials that can never be truly gluten free once they've been exposed. Is paint one of those? What about the veneer used on the counters? Or, do I simply grab my sponge wipe the whole kitchen down hoping that did the trick? 

 

At this point the task seems so overwhelming I really don't even know where to start. 

 

Hi Justaglimmer, and Welcome to the Forum.

 

I would suggest that you use soap, water and paper towels to wash the surfaces, including paint.  This will remove any remaining foods that are on the surface.  If your concern is that the veneer on the surfaces is scratched, then use a large cutting mat, they can be found just about anywhere and travel well too, when you prepare food.  Sanitizers do not breakdown gluten, it must be removed.  I also suggest you don't use a sponge at all.  Use paper towels for all clean up.  If you do with to use a sponge you would have to wash it between each wipe, not so fun.  Make sure you also vacuum out the insides of the cupboards and drawers then wipe down.  The idea is to remove the gluten, not clean it or sanitize it.  In the coping section there is a thread called Newbie 101.  Give it a good read and check all the links provided.  It will give you more detailed information such as replacing toasters, wooden items etc.  

 

Good luck on your cleaning and ask any questions you need.

 

Colleen

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I found, when I was a gluten eater and gluten baker, that white vinegar helped dissolve the flour stuck on my mixer or cabinet ( OK.....I know....I can't cook with out making a big mess :) ). Maybe paper towels? The flour should come off a smooth surface. I don't put food directly on the counter very often. I think if you scrub a few times, you should be fine - unless you live in a bakery? Then I might suggest a match and some gasoline? Just kidding.

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If I clean a new toaster every time it has toasted glutinous products, is that toaster ok to toast gluten free bread? Could be where lingering cross-contamination is coming from. But my cross-contamination could be coming from buying nuts in bulk at the grocery store. Or both. So confused. I have a shared kitchen and have tried to not let my gluten sensitivity interfere with everyone else in my family. But they gladly ate gluten free pasta with me last night. I cannot cook regular glutinous pasta or I will get sick.

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If I clean a new toaster every time it has toasted glutinous products, is that toaster ok to toast gluten free bread? Could be where lingering cross-contamination is coming from. But my cross-contamination could be coming from buying nuts in bulk at the grocery store. Or both. So confused. I have a shared kitchen and have tried to not let my gluten sensitivity interfere with everyone else in my family. But they gladly ate gluten free pasta with me last night. I cannot cook regular glutinous pasta or I will get sick.

I got a separate toaster in red ( the color of gluten-free at my house) and keep it in the cabinet. If you only occasionally use a toaster, you could get or make toaster bags. I'll get a link and be back.

I'm back!

These are the kind I have. You can find them in some stores. I like this brand because its big enough to enclose the whole piece of bread. Some are shorter. They are great for traveling and using the hotel breakfast toaster. Also, you could make something with parchment paper if you are into origami. :).

http://www.laprimashops.com/Set-NoStick-Toast-Toaster-Bags/dp/B0012XGM92?traffic_src=froogle&utm_medium=organic&utm_source=froogle&gclid=CMWl7sbalLwCFczm7AodXnkA0A

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Very cool! Thanks so much for that info on toaster bags. I believe I will also get a new dedicated gluten free toaster.

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Check out the newbie thread for other tips on avoiding cross contamination. Other items like a colander

or wooden spoons can gluten you in a shared kitchen. No bulk nuts either!

Good luck!

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where is the newbie thread? i hafe seen it refered to a couple times while browsing this forum but i can't find it. i'm new here.

 

Check out the newbie thread for other tips on avoiding cross contamination. Other items like a colander
or wooden spoons can gluten you in a shared kitchen. No bulk nuts either!

Good luck!

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i missed this thing about bulk nuts. i just ate some toasted almonds that i soaked for around 36 hours before toasting. i'm now feeling so tired i'm getting really depressed like i can't get out of this mess.

 

so why the bulk nuts? i'l stop eating them but how does it happen?

 

Check out the newbie thread for other tips on avoiding cross contamination. Other items like a colander
or wooden spoons can gluten you in a shared kitchen. No bulk nuts either!

Good luck!

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i missed this thing about bulk nuts. i just ate some toasted almonds that i soaked for around 36 hours before toasting. i'm now feeling so tired i'm getting really depressed like i can't get out of this mess.

so why the bulk nuts? i'l stop eating them but how does it happen?

Usually, we don't use bulk nuts, flours etc because it is so easy for them to be cc'd. - a scooper from something gluteny used in the gluten-free stuff, for example.

In your case, it sounds like you washed those nuts pretty well. Maybe your problem was the nuts themselves? Or something else you ate?

Anyway....... Back to the discussion about de- glutening your kitchen.

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Additional suggestions for avoiding cross contamination in your home.

 

 

 

• Don’t use wooden spoons or cutting boards that also are used to prepare gluten-containing foods because the spoons and boards can harbor residual gluten and bacteria. Metal or plastic are better options.

• Cover shared grilling surfaces when barbequing because unless the grill reaches 500˚F or higher for 30 minutes or longer, grilling won’t eliminate any residual gluten.

• Buy a separate waffle maker or bread maker if the one the family uses doesn’t have parts that can be disassembled and placed in the dishwasher.

• If using a separate toaster isn’t possible, use toaster-safe toaster bags such as Celinal Toast-It or Vat19 ToastIt, available online.

 

Pam Cureton, RD, LDN, a dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland, adds these tips:

• When planning parties at home, prepare a buffet of foods that are 100% gluten free to prevent accidental cross-contamination among family members and guests.

• Buy squeezable condiment containers for ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise to prevent double dipping. If you don’t purchase squeezable containers, mark condiment jars as safe depending on whether they’ve been exposed to gluten-containing foods.

• Store gluten-free products on the top shelf of the pantry or refrigerator so other foods don’t accidentally cross-contaminate them.

 

Shelley Case, BSc, RD, president of Case Nutrition Consulting and author of Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide, offers the following ideas:

 

• In supermarkets, don’t buy unpackaged foods stored in bins. The scoops used to place the foods in bags or containers may have been previously used on nearby gluten-containing foods and may not have been sufficiently cleaned.

• Use different colored stickers to distinguish between gluten-containing and gluten-free products in the pantry and fridge.

• Purchase a colander in a different color for gluten-free foods so it doesn’t get mixed up with the colander used for gluten-containing foods.

• Buy gluten-free grains that are certified gluten free to ensure cross-contamination didn’t take place during processing.

• Buy gluten-free flours marked as gluten free from reputable companies that are more likely to test for gluten.

• Avoid purchasing imported foods. Other countries may not abide by the same gluten-free standards as the United States.

 

 

 

 

Found here:

 

http://www.todaysdie...100713p16.shtml

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