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Just Wanted To Share... Race Training Before And After Diagnosis
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For those who don't know, I was diagnosed whilst training for my first marathon and experiencing extended runner's tummy, as well as worsening training times. I was diagnosed with severe anaemia at the same time and one of my big questions was, how will this affect my training? Should I stop, cut down, how long for? So I just wanted to share my story so far for anyone who may have the same questions.

 

I was diagnosed mid-September, ran my first marathon at the end of the month and went gluten free in early October. After that I had a few crappy months adjusting to the new diet and getting the anaemia under control - I would say I had about three months of only running twice a week and doing my pole fitness and aerial acrobatics once a week each. There doesn't seem to be hard and fast rules re. coeliac and training so this was made up as felt right.

 

Enter January 2014, three months gluten free, two months on iron tablets and a new training plan for a 10 mile race at the end of March. I'm in my second full week of the training plan and it feels so amazing to train (running) five times a week AND SEE AN IMPROVEMENT! And to not feel exhausted during every run and to be able to get oxygen to my muscles properly (and not plan my routes around public toilets)! Whereas before I would run with a feeling of trying not to do my worst, now I run wondering how good I can make it. 

 

I just wanted to share this as a lift for anyone in my situation and a reminder to be patient with yourself (as everyone here reminded me to be). You are getting a second chance to be your actual best - the results will be worth it :) 

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Congrats!

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Thanks! I am driving everyone nuts here going on about how much I'm enjoying training now (because after all, I've been doing it for ages, right?) It's just so much better.

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So happy for you!!! I love this update so much! :D  :P  :lol:

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Aha thank you! So nice to have the support of this board on this :) 

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    • Hello, I see you posted this a long while ago, and perhaps--I hope-- it's no longer a matter of concern, but I thought I'd mention that shortly before I was diagnosed for celiac's, I had distinct yellow blotches on the corners of my eyelids toward my nose. Some months after I had stopped eating gluten, the yellow gradually went away, and--as it just reappeared now several years later, I googled the issue again.  I am only speculating here, but I do believe it is related to liver problems, which, in turn, are related to celiac's. I don't think liver function tests cover all aspects of liver health. I say this because when I was pregnant I developed a temporary liver condition called interhepatic colestasis of pregnancy (ICP), but my liver function tests had been fine. (The condition is diagnosed based on bile levels in the blood, not on liver function). I discovered upon some research that (of course!) ICP  can be associated with celiac's disease.  My hunch is this-- that celiac's presents two problems to the liver: 1) the malabsorption of nutrients--esp. Vit. K2-- that are vital liver health; 2) since gluten registers as a toxin to the immune system (I think?), perhaps the liver gets overloaded processing so much toxic material. Or perhaps there's some other reason. At any rate, poor liver health and celiac's do seem to be linked, according to a few articles I've found. Anyway, hope your problems are resolved now.  
    • my daughter did stool test from enterolab but this gluten sensitive blood test is from http://requestatest.com/tests/search    
    • OK, was your daughter tested by a doctor or did you do one of these order online stool tests? And the same question goes for your tests. Can you give a link to the company?
    • NO. Approx. 1/3 of the population carries the genes for celiac but that does NOT mean they will ever present with celiac. Only a small percentage of them will. A gene test is really used more to rule out celiac rather than to diagnose it. What I meant was that since your daughter is diagnosed and IF you carry one or both of the celiac genes then there is a greater chance you are celiac or "early stages" especially in light of your symptoms. All 3 of those factors weighed together was what I was referring to.
    • by the way, I do find the lab who does the gluten sensitive test Gluten Allergy IgE Test This test is used to determine if a person has an allergic reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.  Roughly 1 in 30 adults and 1 in 40 children suffer from a Gluten Allergy.  An IgE test looks for antibodies which develop in a person who has a particular allergy.  Gluten Allergy can display symptoms similar to other conditions such as Celiac Disease.  Unlike an allergy, Celiac Disease can do permanent harm to the body if left untreated.  Allergy testing when a person is experiencing symptoms can help identify or rule out an allergy as the cause.

      Gluten Allergy is typically less severe than other Gluten related conditions like Celiac Disease.  People with Gluten Allergy will often experience abdominal discomfort, bloating, gas, constipation, or diarrhea when they eat products containing gluten.  These symptoms usually stop when a person cuts gluten out of their diet.

      A Gluten Allergy IgE test can be ordered to help determine if someone allergic to gluten.  This test can also be ordered when a person is testing for Celiac Disease and has had negative results on Celiac specific antibody tests.  An allergy test can also be ordered prior to Celiac testing to rule out Gluten Allergy as a likely cause for a person’s symptoms.
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